Dinner Impossible

Baking By maddyscreations Updated 22 Jan 2010 , 3:24am by sugarandslice

maddyscreations Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 2:35am
post #1 of 5

I was watching dinner impossible last weekend and he had to make a 4 tier cake for a teenager when he flipped the cakes out of the pans he poured some kind of liquid on top of each one to add moisture, what I am wondering is does this work and if so what was the liquid he used or you use?

4 replies
Kiddiekakes Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 2:40am
post #2 of 5

I saw that episode..I think he used a simple syrup...I would be too scared that it would cause the cake to go to mush...

antonia74 Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 2:47am
post #3 of 5

It's a 1:1 ratio of water to sugar. Put it in a saucepan and bring it to a roiling boil just until it turns clear....don't leave it boiling or it will reduce and thicken more than you'd like it to.

Remove it from the stove, stir in a little flavouring like vanilla, citrus zests, liqueurs, etc. Let it cool completely before you brush it onto your cakes. (He was the first person I ever saw add it directly to a steaming hot cake. Typically, you're supposed to brush it on cooled cakes.)

LaBellaFlor Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 3:01am
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddiekakes

I saw that episode..I think he used a simple syrup...I would be too scared that it would cause the cake to go to mush...




I've only done it on a cool cake, but you'ld be surprise how much syrup a cake can hold and all it does is keep it moist. No sogginess at all. Especially helpful for a cake that you are decorating 3 days later.

sugarandslice Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 3:24am
post #5 of 5

I prefer a syrup made with 1:1 boiling water:apricot jam. I then add a little Cointreau or Grand Marnier. Keeps just about forever in the fridge. I've only used in on cold cakes too. But I will put it onto warm cupcakes if they're not going to be eaten till the next day (poke a few holes with a skewer first)

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