Doming "science" Questions

Baking By bonniebakes Updated 23 Jan 2010 , 10:06pm by prterrell

bonniebakes Posted 21 Jan 2010 , 10:23pm
post #1 of 7

I've been reading the threads about doming on cupcakes and have found some great information about the temperature the cupcakes are cooked at and the resulting dome/non-domed tops. But, I'm wondering... what ingredients in scratch cupcake recipes will result in doming?

I've been experimenting with different scratch recipes and cooking a thte same temperature, sometimes I get domes, sometimes flat tops, and sometimes "muffin" tops (where the batter rises above the cupcake liner and them spreads out to the sides and sticks to the pan). Since the recipes have all been baked at the same temperature, it must be because of the recipe... either the method or the ingredients, right?

So I'm asking all of you baking scientists out there... what ingredients or methods contribute to the issue, and how do they do that?


thanks in advance!!

Bonnie

6 replies
ApplegumKitchen Posted 21 Jan 2010 , 10:39pm
post #2 of 7

Lots of variables contribute -

Quantity of batter - use a scoop to ensure same amount used each time you bake - you'll have to TEST the amounts used to get the result you want

Combination of ingredients - flour, eggs, sugar, milk, butter (yes these are the ingredients in most base recipes) but the ratios of each to the other will produce different results eg; thickness of batter - as will the BRAND of butter/flour/sugar.
Even something as far removed as WHERE the wheat was grown that goes into the production of the flour WILL have an impact.

The type of oven AND the oven temps will also influence - the optional use of a fan? (after LOTS of testing- in my oven) I have found I need to have the fan OFF for the first 5-10mins of baking for cupcakes to rise evenly


Other things include - the types of pans and liners that you are using

To become a good baker you must cook, cook, and cook some more - taking observations all along - make notes of what you do each time and when you get a success - RECORD it - so that you can duplicate it!
In time you will be able to look at a new recipe and nearly visualise how it will turn out merely by a quick glance at the ingredients.

To help you understand the function of ingredients used in baking check out this article I did on the Cakes & More Blog
http://www.cakesandmore.org/blog/2008/09/baking-the-function-of-ingredients/

bonniebakes Posted 21 Jan 2010 , 10:58pm
post #3 of 7

thanks, Applegumkitchen!

I do understand that all of those things contribute, and I am diligently taking notes on all my experiments!

I guess I'm trying to understand what the ratios are for the ingredients that allow the cupcakes to rise and dome vs. rise and spread. Or, for example, what I might modify in a recipe that has "muffin tops" to make it rise and dome.

I'll check out that link - thanks!

prterrell Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 1:02am
post #4 of 7

Could you post the recipes and their results? That would make it easier to analyze.

bonniebakes Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 1:56pm
post #5 of 7

prterrell - I really appreciate the response!

I'm really looking for general baking science information... what ingredients effect the rise/spread... so that I can play with recipes I like the flavor of, and create one that also has the rise I'm looking for for different occasions.

I'm not sure if my question is making sense... (sorry!)

ApplegumKitchen Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 8:23pm
post #6 of 7

Bonniebakes - sorry to sound like I am still avoiding a direct answer but it really is a case of needing a BASE to start with. I provided you with the link for The Function of Ingredients which really does explain what each ingredient does.

I could say TOO much sugar can cause a 'weak' structure - but you won't know what TOO much is.... Too much in relation to what ? it is in relation to the quantity of eggs and the quantity of flour, the amount of raising agent, the type of raising agent in addition to the size of tins and the amount of batter used.

Just for the purpose of this exercise - why don't you post your most recent recipe and include the data that you have kept in relation to what you did and the outcome you got.

At least that way we have a starting point.

The rise you describe is most often controlled with the quantity of the batter and the oven temps - but perhaps a generic answer would be that a thicker batter domes better than a thin one - but it would depend once again on the ingredients that you are using and their quantities.
The 'muffin' top is normally the sign of TOO much batter for the size tin - it is rising TOO high with no side supports so it overflows

prterrell Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 10:06pm
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonniebakes

prterrell - I really appreciate the response!

I'm really looking for general baking science information... what ingredients effect the rise/spread... so that I can play with recipes I like the flavor of, and create one that also has the rise I'm looking for for different occasions.

I'm not sure if my question is making sense... (sorry!)




Sorry, I can't really answer that, other than the obvious answer about baking soda/baking powder affecting rise.

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