using cake mixes from boxes

Decorating By SallyBratt Updated 24 Jan 2010 , 2:03am by JanH

Mike1394 Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 3:29pm
post #121 of 282

Vanilla cake
321g sugar
113g unsalted butter, softened
2 lg eggs
1 lg egg white
336g all purpose flour
7.5g baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
312 ml homo milk
2 teaspoons real vanilla extract

OK my turn LOLOLOL I hope some of this is a typo. Get rid of the egg white, add a touch of sugar, and a lil more butter. NOW you'll have a moist cake. I truly don't understand the extra egg white. Alls it will do is confuse the other ingredients.

Mike

Ginni Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 3:45pm
post #122 of 282

[quote="Mike1394"] Also consider yourself lucky that they have palates made of cement. icon_biggrin.gif LOLOLOL J/K LOLOL



I'm glad you made yourself laugh. I didn't find that funny actually. There is no reason to insult the taste of cake mixes just because you don't like the taste of them. You also insulted all my customers which I'm not happy about. I could say that people around here are more about taste then anything because we are all cajun. People all over have said that our cooking is better than most places so I don't think their palates are made of cement.

Ginni Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:00pm
post #123 of 282

that joke was in bad taste and that's all I was saying. This discussion was going well until you made that comment. you need to think before you post a "joke" about a very controversial topic. Please next time just think, "is this gunna make someone upset?" That joke was a low blow to anyone who uses cake mixes. I'm glad you bake from scratch. Go ahead and keep baking like that. but there was no reason to get ugly.

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:14pm
post #124 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Vanilla cake
321g sugar
113g unsalted butter, softened
2 lg eggs
1 lg egg white
336g all purpose flour
7.5g baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
312 ml homo milk
2 teaspoons real vanilla extract

OK my turn LOLOLOL I hope some of this is a typo. Get rid of the egg white, add a touch of sugar, and a lil more butter. NOW you'll have a moist cake. I truly don't understand the extra egg white. Alls it will do is confuse the other ingredients.

Mike




Before you go laughing at what you think is a typo you should try the cake. It is moist and I've made it many times with great success. It's a denser cake...as I said...but it lends itself very well to sculpted and tiered cakes designs.

*moderator edited*

Ginni Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:19pm
post #125 of 282

I am a box mix baker but one thing I haven't found is one that is good for sculpting. Do you think this recipe would be good in a high humidity environment? I would love to try it.

Mike1394 Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:24pm
post #126 of 282

Not beltting at all Sally. Egg whites are protien. Protien are tougheners in a cake. Now that the caveat of it being sturdy enough for carving. That makes it a whole different ballgame.

Mike

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:25pm
post #127 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginni

I am a box mix baker but one thing I haven't found is one that is good for sculpting. Do you think this recipe would be good in a high humidity environment? I would love to try it.




I really don't know...but it's worth a try...right? And I'm sure you'll try it before you come back and tell me how wrong it is.

icon_rolleyes.gif

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:27pm
post #128 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Not beltting at all Sally. Egg whites are protien. Protien are tougheners in a cake. Now that the caveat of it being sturdy enough for carving. That makes it a whole different ballgame.

Mike




Good to know Mike.

I'm actually searching for a lighter vanilla scratch recipe to use when I don't need this dense a cake.

This one and the almond one are good for 3D sculpted cakes. If you look at my photos the cat is made with the vanilla recipe and the fish is made with the almond.

Ginni Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:47pm
post #129 of 282

I will definitely try it before I ever said anything about it.

I love my mixes. I will say that. But they do have down sides. I am very limited in the kinds of cake I can have. I don't like pound cake but I have found that is the only kind that I can use on sculpted cakes without them falling apart. I will absolutely try that recipe.

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 4:54pm
post #130 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginni

I will definitely try it before I ever said anything about it.

I love my mixes. I will say that. But they do have down sides. I am very limited in the kinds of cake I can have. I don't like pound cake but I have found that is the only kind that I can use on sculpted cakes without them falling apart. I will absolutely try that recipe.




I suggest the almond as well then. The flavour is amazing...and I'm sure you already do this so ignore me if it's old info...but sculpt on a frozen cake with a serrated knife. It cuts much nicer.

jojo76 Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:05pm
post #131 of 282

SallyBrat I love the sound of the almond cake! Thanks for posting the recipes. Could I bake it in an 8" round tin, and how long would I bake for? I have lots of marzipan I need to use up left over from christmas.......

Ginni Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:15pm
post #132 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyBratt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginni

I will definitely try it before I ever said anything about it.

I love my mixes. I will say that. But they do have down sides. I am very limited in the kinds of cake I can have. I don't like pound cake but I have found that is the only kind that I can use on sculpted cakes without them falling apart. I will absolutely try that recipe.



I suggest the almond as well then. The flavour is amazing...and I'm sure you already do this so ignore me if it's old info...but sculpt on a frozen cake with a serrated knife. It cuts much nicer.




I do freeze the cakes before hand because I have a lot of trouble getting them to settle before I stack the cakes. I am still very much a beginner even though I've been doing cakes for over 2 years. I use a bread knife lol. Its the best thing I've found. Is there another knife that would be better?

cakesdivine Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:18pm
post #133 of 282

*moderator edited*

Welcome to CC Bratt!

Yes you asked a hot topic question...but eventhough I have answered this on several other threads, I will answer you as well. I'm in a good mood today.

I use both mixes and few (very few) scratch recipes. Most of the mixes are doctored, but there are a couple that are straight. I only use DH, have tried the others and they suck, especially Betty Crocker, Pills is an ok second to DH, but it doesn't yield as much batter so in the long run is more costly to use.

My icings on the otherhand are 100% from scratch. I use a equal salted butter to Hi ratio Shortening with stable pasturized meringue, less p sugar than most buttercreams, and add pure vanilla, cornstarch, and a bit of Cream cheese to make the butter flavor "POP", my BC does not crust, I personally don't like the taste or texture of crusting BC's and obviously neither do my clients because my BC icing is what they always rave about. There isn't a set recipe with the dry ingredients as the amount of sugar & cornstarch depends on how humid or hot it is (I'm in Texas). So basically made to taste & texture. I pretty much have it down to a science though.

My ganache is premium chocolate with heavy cream and butter. Royal is pasturized egg whites (not whipped), with p sugar and lemon juice. My Cream Cheese icing is the same as my BC, but I use 80 oz of whipped cream cheese so never the cream cheese icing that others seem to have. Those are the only icings I ever use.

I do order my fondant from Fondarific, and won't use any other brand now, and I have tried them ALL, even the homemade. The homemade is just too time consuming, and it is another bowl and beater I have to clean...not interested.

As for my clients...I have never had a client ask me if my cakes are from a mix or scratch. But if they did I would be honest about it. The reason they don't ask is because they taste how yummy and moist my cakes are, and how my icings don't overpower the flavor of the cake, and they don't really care how I acheived that level of excellence in the flavor of my cakes, they just love them.

I worked at 2 different custom bakeries in the past, and both bought and used straight from the box with NO doctoring Betty Crocker mixes because it is the cheapest; the used the gross shortening only BC (still wondering how someone can call it buttercream if you don't use any butter in it). Did they ever tell anyone their product was from a box?...nope. And they were still churning out 200+ cakes a week. These were NOT grocery store bakeries. That is a WHOLE other issue...LOL!

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:21pm
post #134 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by jojo76

SallyBrat I love the sound of the almond cake! Thanks for posting the recipes. Could I bake it in an 8" round tin, and how long would I bake for? I have lots of marzipan I need to use up left over from christmas.......




it takes about 30 to 40 min but since everyone's oven is different I always set my timer for 15 min intervals and keep checking it. I also turn the pan around when it's half way done to ensure even baking...jsut in case the front of your oven is hotter than the back. Great tips I learned in school.

I actually forgot a layer in the oven because I forgot to set my timer and even tho it bake for likely 5 min past what it should it was still really moist and came out lovely. The only thing was that the outside was a bit browner but no one will see that once it's covered.

artscallion Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:25pm
post #135 of 282

Hey Sally, remember 10 pages ago when people were saying, "uh-oh"? This is what they meant.

Your cakes are beautiful. Welcome to CC. This is all part of the fun. Don't let it scare you away. Pretty soon you'll be the one saying, "uh-oh. get the popcorn, Earl"
icon_smile.gif

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:27pm
post #136 of 282

Welcome to CC Bratt!

Yes you asked a hot topic question...but eventhough I have answered this on several other threads, I will answer you as well. I'm in a good mood today.
*moderator edited*

I do order my fondant from Fondarific, and won't use any other brand now, and I have tried them ALL, even the homemade. The homemade is just too time consuming, and it is another bowl and beater I have to clean...not interested. [/quote]

My scratch cakes aren't dry!!! icon_cry.gif

icon_lol.gif

thanks for the welcome and for not raking me over the coals. I've got to get off this forum tho and get some work done. I have 6 books due to go to the printers early next week and I'm way behind! Yikes!!

Have fun guys...and whether it's from a box or from scratch...happy baking! icon_biggrin.gif

_Jamie_ Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:28pm
post #137 of 282

What I noticed when I started baking scratch, is the obvious lack of oily moisture in my cakes. The cake mixes I always tried required you add oil to them.

Now, call me crazy, but anything with a cup of oil in it is going to have the illusion of being moist. I say illusion, because technically (in my opinion) it isn't moist, it's just oily.

So, I can understand where someone would think a scratch cake that is moist (if baked and mixed properly) isn't moist, if they are basing what they perceive moist from box mixes and their oil requirements.

_Jamie_ Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:28pm
post #138 of 282

Neither are mine Sally, neither are mine. icon_biggrin.gif

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:29pm
post #139 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Hey Sally, remember 10 pages ago when people were saying, "uh-oh"? This is what they meant.

Your cakes are beautiful. Welcome to CC. This is all part of the fun. Don't let it scare you away. Pretty soon you'll be the one saying, "uh-oh. get the popcorn, Earl"
icon_smile.gif




Thanks. I'm glad I could provide some amusement at least.

icon_wink.gif

And no worries, it takes a whole lot more than this to scare me!

_Jamie_ Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:43pm
post #140 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Her sales pitch is, as is mine......that she uses premium ingredients, madagascar and tahitian vanilla beans combined to make PURE vanilla extract, locally bought butter etc. etc. etc......




icon_lol.gif I just decided last night on something new for my booth at an upcoming bridal show. I'm going to take a pic of a group of ingredients. My fancy bottle of homemade vanilla extract, some vanilla beans, some callets of good chocolate, little spoons with baking soda/powder, pats of butter, coffee beans, fresh fruit, eggs, a scoop of flour, sugar, etc., etc. Put it in a nice frame.

Take a picture of a box of DH or something else while it's on the shelf at Walmart.

Put them next to each other.

Come taste the difference at XXXXX Cakes.

Because I absolutely market that way! thumbs_up.gif

madgeowens Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:50pm
post #141 of 282

Thats a good story Deb. I have people drooling over my "ckaes" and they are cake mix, and sometimes I doctor them but not always. I will challenge anyone to make it better. I see no reason for people to be down right insulting about it though, and I do take offense!

Dolledupcakes Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:56pm
post #142 of 282

Does anyone realize what scratch means? When you bake from scratch? Starting with basic ingredients, not prepared items. If you want to get technical, I am sure most of you don't churn your own butter, or go out to get your own wheat. Yeah, that's what I thought. Unless, you have a farm, then pardon me.
Therefore, this posting is ridiculous to me, considering that I have taken classes at bakeries in Orange County who bake from box mixes. In addition, their cakes taste just as good as my g-ma's "scratch" cake recipes from Cuba.

Ginni Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:17pm
post #143 of 282

Cakesbylissette
I totally agree. I have people reeling over my cakes. Some know they are a mix and some do not.

I think everyone needs to just agree to disagree on this subject. We need to stop arguing. No one is going to change their opinions. I see problems with box mixes and I also see problems with scratch cakes. I personally think a good scratch cake tastes the same as a good box mix. Whether a box mix is oily or not, no customer cares as longs as it is moist. No one has told me that they have ever thought my cakes are oily. I am definitely open to trying scratch recipes.

We are one community of cake decorators. We need to be talking about how we can help each other find new ideas, better techniques, and anything else that we can help each other with. This debate is never going to end. All we are doing is making people upset and hurting feelings. I say we take a stance that everyone should be open to trying new things and be able to see the other side of this debate. That doesn't mean that if you are a scratch baker you need to try box mix or the other way around. I think it would benefit everyone to see both sides.

I am not trying to offend anyone. That is not my purpose here. I hope we can all get along. I am very sorry if my post does offend someone. That is not my point at all. I apologize in advance.

Dolledupcakes Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:22pm
post #144 of 282

Thanks Ginni.

I say do whatever it takes to make your customers happy. And do whatever works for you. THE END! icon_biggrin.gif

newmansmom2004 Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:25pm
post #145 of 282

Welcome to CC, Bratt!

I like scratch baking first and foremost because I'm a control freak and I like knowing every little thing that goes into my cakes and cookies and I want to use the best ingredients available, but there's one box mix I cannot live without...the white cake mix. You can beat me with a big stick all day long and I would still not serve any of the scratch white cakes I've made to anyone. They stink....and yep, that includes the popular WASC cake. I've probably tried 15 different white scratch cake recipes and they all have the texture of cardboard that's been run through a food mill then mushed back together with elementary school paste and the flavors are horrible. The only white cake I find edible is a box mix that's been doctored.

As many have said here, if your clients like your cakes, don't change a thing and be proud that they like what you provide. There's no right or wrong here; it's all just a matter of taste and you'll find those who will never eat anything but scratch cakes and those who will never eat anything but box mixes.

_Jamie_ Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:27pm
post #146 of 282

I love how some boxers get so riled up. Don't take it personally that we have an advantage when it comes to pitching our products.

If you were the only one selling real fur coats in a sea of fake Chinese imports, wouldn't you tout that? Not trying to be insulting, but this is the business side of me talking now.

I don't see how a boxer should take this personally.

Is there some way you can promote the benefit of your box mixes?

It's a fair question.

I mean, if you and I were next to each other at a bridal show, and one bride left my booth with info about my recipes, the names of premium ingredients I use, the methods I use.....what do you say when they ask you about your recipes?

Again, talking business now. Not personalities. This should not turn into a "box/scratch bash" or make me out to be a big meanie. JJust making some observations, that's all.

browniebatterer Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:42pm
post #147 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakesbylissette

Does anyone realize what scratch means? When you bake from scratch? Starting with basic ingredients, not prepared items. If you want to get technical, I am sure most of you don't churn your own butter, or go out to get your own wheat. Yeah, that's what I thought. Unless, you have a farm, then pardon me.
Therefore, this posting is ridiculous to me, considering that I have taken classes at bakeries in Orange County who bake from box mixes. In addition, their cakes taste just as good as my g-ma's "scratch" cake recipes from Cuba.




Are you serious? icon_eek.gif That is ridiculous. No reasonable client would ever think that you needed to make your own flour and butter for a cake to be scratch. That they need to go out and milk their own freakin cow or whatever. It means you used basic ingredients to make a cake. You don't dump it out of a box.

Scratch vs mix doesn't really matter. It depends on how the baker wants to run their business and how happy their clients are. The only thing that matters is that the baker would present their cakes as scratch when they are not.

SallyBratt Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:43pm
post #148 of 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginni

I say we take a stance that everyone should be open to trying new things and be able to see the other side of this debate. That doesn't mean that if you are a scratch baker you need to try box mix or the other way around. I think it would benefit everyone to see both sides.

I am not trying to offend anyone. That is not my purpose here. I hope we can all get along. I am very sorry if my post does offend someone. That is not my point at all. I apologize in advance.




that wasn't offensive at all. and I totally agree with you.

i didn't start this discussion in hopes of causing a fight or hurt feelings or anything else. i started it out of curiosity based on what my thoughts and opinions and expectation are. I'd never heard of anyone using boxed mixes to make cakes for sale and I was curious. Simple as that.

Please, people, don't be so defensive and get angry with each other. There's no need for it.

I do think that everyone knows that 'baking from scratch' doesn't mean you have to milk the cow, churn the butter, process the sugar, mill the flour etc. We're not Amish after all (at least I'm not...and if any of you are, how in the world did you get access to a computer?!). Scratch baking means to take all the individual ingredients for something and put them together to create the final product.

motherofgrace Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:48pm
post #149 of 282

Im jus tsaying I take the time to do induvidual ingrediants as well, and the mix is just 1 small ingrediant.

Everything else I do scratch, icings, cookies, candy......and bread lol (and if you need a tip on not hard bread ill give it to you!(and for the people who missed the whole bread thing... this is a joke))

Im proud of all the baking I do, and the mix is just one more ingrediant in my recipe. icon_smile.gif

motherofgrace Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 6:51pm
post #150 of 282

oh i must add, I make all my fondant from scratch too.......

So its not abotu what people do scratch and dont..... everyone has things that they buy and everyoen has things they insist on making themselves icon_smile.gificon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%