How To Get 4" Tiers Consistently?

Decorating By erinalicia Updated 21 Jan 2010 , 4:38pm by Mug-a-Bug

erinalicia Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 5:52pm
post #1 of 6

I am having an issue with getting my cakes to a finished height of at least 4". My cakes usually always come above the height of my 2" pans when baked. I allow them to cool slightly and use the pan as my guide for leveling, for which I just use the small wilton leveler to do.

I don't usually torte since the cakes are just for birthdays and family get-togethers. Could that be why I am not getting a full 4" height? Most of my tiers are 3.5-3.75 inches tall.

The only time this is an issue is when I've used the SPS to stack because I hate to cut the 4" pillars and even when I've cut them to size (or so I thought) I had a large gap between the bottom cake and the separator plate.

I'd appreciate any insight or advice. Thanks!

5 replies
KoryAK Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 6:45pm
post #2 of 6

If you are cutting two cakes off at the top of the 2" pan, how is it not ending up at 4" tall? Especially with whatever buttercream goes in between the two layers and on the top and the cardboards? Perhaps your cake is shrinking down after it is cut? If so, Try cooling it completely then putting it back into the pan for leveling (if you need it).

TexasSugar Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 6:52pm
post #3 of 6

Have you measured your pans?

prterrell Posted 21 Jan 2010 , 2:07am
post #4 of 6

I'm w/ TexasSugar. Are you sure your pans are 2" tall? Some say they are, but are actually much shorter!

erinalicia Posted 21 Jan 2010 , 2:51pm
post #5 of 6

sorry ladies, I thought I had watched the topic so I'd get emails when someone responded....

I just measured my round pans (they are wilton pans) and they are 2".

I guess it could be that the cakes are settling or shrinking after cooling. When I fill the cakes, I take a clean pan and put on top with something heavy in it to get any air bubbles out and prevent any bulging once it's completely iced. I only do that for 30 minutes to an hour if I can't just let the cake sit overnight to settle.

Thanks for the insight... I'll just keep working at it. It isn't really that much of an issue with birthday cakes and stuff, only when I need to use the SPS. But I've been asked to do a wedding cake later this year and I'd like to have my tiers look consistent and I'll probably use the SPS since I'll have to travel a little ways with it.

Thanks again! icon_smile.gif

Mug-a-Bug Posted 21 Jan 2010 , 4:38pm
post #6 of 6

You have to make up the rest of the height in icing. Use your pillar legs to measure and make the top of your icing just a little higher. I don't like SPS for this reason. Good luck. icon_biggrin.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%