Can I Crumb Coat My Cake, Then Freeze, Thaw & Apply Fond

Decorating By Cojack Updated 24 Jan 2010 , 5:36am by cakesrock

Cojack Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:53pm
post #1 of 14

Hello.

Would I have a successful cake in the end if I crumb coat, freeze and thaw to finish off with fondant?

Is there "how to" video on crum coating a cake on the website?

Is there a recommended (and it has worked) buttercream recipe to use to crumb coat the cake?

Thank you for everyone's input.

Jacqueline icon_smile.gif

13 replies
DianeLM Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:18pm
post #2 of 14

I'm curious about a couple of things...

First, why are you freezing the cake? So you can work on it at a later date?

Second, why are you considering crumbcoating it before you freeze it? Why not just freeze it naked?

I would not crumbcoat a cake, freeze and thaw. I would be concerned about the crumbcoat sliding off the cake as it thaws.

That said, I almost ALWAYS freeze my cakes before applying fondant. However, I only freeze long enough to firm up the outside of the cake - 20 minutes or more, depending on the size of the cake. Never frozen solid all the way through. If the cake is frozen solid, I will thaw it completely, then put it back in the freezer for the quick pre-fondant freeze.

I prefer to crumbcoat my cakes with a mixture of cake crumbs and buttercream icing, also called 'spackle'. I get it as smooth as possible, then freeze until it's really firm.

Take the cake out of the freezer and apply the fondant. Don't need to moisten cake because as the spackle thaws, the condensation will help the fondant adhere. By the time the cake has completely thawed (usually 30 minutes or so), the fondant has firmed up all the way around.

Cojack Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 5:05pm
post #3 of 14

Thanks Diane for the advice.

I'm freezing the cakes because my only option is to work on it at a later date. Do you think if the bake the cakes, layer and freeze each tier,to complete at a later date would work? I have to bake 8 cakes total to produce a 4 tier cake. I then could crumb coat once the cakes have completely thawed and follow your previous email advice. Yes?

I want my step is to cover with fondant, decorate and then deliver to customer. Assemble tier at customers location.

Is there at all any short steps you would recommend?

Is there a 'Spackle' recipe on the cake central website to crumb coat the cakes?

Thanks again for your help and time.

Jacqueline
icon_confused.gif

cakesrock Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 5:20pm
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cojack

Thanks Diane for the advice.

I'm freezing the cakes because my only option is to work on it at a later date. Do you think if the bake the cakes, layer and freeze each tier,to complete at a later date would work? I have to bake 8 cakes total to produce a 4 tier cake. I then could crumb coat once the cakes have completely thawed and follow your previous email advice. Yes?

I want my step is to cover with fondant, decorate and then deliver to customer. Assemble tier at customers location.

Is there at all any short steps you would recommend?

Is there a 'Spackle' recipe on the cake central website to crumb coat the cakes?

Thanks again for your help and time.

Jacqueline
icon_confused.gif



I agree with Diane - don't crumbcoat before freezing. Though, I freeze, then fill or even freeze, then fill and pop it back in the freezer again.
But I start crumbcoating as soon as I take it out of the freezer, then roll out my fondant and apply. It's thawed enough at that point. I'm very busy working with two little kids too, so this helps me manage my time.
I also wrap it well, then re-freeze the fondant decorated cake. Just make sure you thaw the cake for a few hours in it's wrappings bfore taking off the wrappings, so the condensation comes off on the wrapping. Then let it air dry so it's no longer tacky to the touch. And wrap it well with Glad seal and wrap or saran and put in 2 garbage bags (taking most of the air out) or put in a cake container. I can't tell a difference between the fresh or frozen, but I mostly use WASC and Chef Stef's red velvet. HTH

I don't know what a 'spackle' recipe is, though?

cakesrock Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 5:23pm
post #5 of 14

PS: I like IndyDebi's BC!

DianeLM Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 5:56pm
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cojack

Thanks Diane for the advice.

I'm freezing the cakes because my only option is to work on it at a later date. Do you think if the bake the cakes, layer and freeze each tier,to complete at a later date would work? I have to bake 8 cakes total to produce a 4 tier cake. I then could crumb coat once the cakes have completely thawed and follow your previous email advice. Yes?

I want my step is to cover with fondant, decorate and then deliver to customer. Assemble tier at customers location.

Is there at all any short steps you would recommend?

Is there a 'Spackle' recipe on the cake central website to crumb coat the cakes?

Thanks again for your help and time.

Jacqueline
icon_confused.gif




You can absolutely fill and layer each tier, then freeze without crumbcoat. I often do that a week or more in advance if I know I won't have as much time to assemble and decorate as I'd like.

Yes, you are correct that you do not want to crumbcoat the cakes right out of the freezer. The condensation that forms as the cake is thawing may cause the crumbcoat to get slimy and slide right off the cake.

There isn't a spackle recipe that I'm aware of. When I make it, I prefer to cut off the sides, top and bottom of my cake layer first. That way, I'm only using the fluffy, crumbly crumbs in the center of the cake and not the gooey or dry outside. This makes a smooth spackle. Gooey pieces will just ball together and make your spackle lumpy.

I crumble the cake into a bowl, then add icing - about 3:1 icing to crumbs. I want it very smooth and loose. Sometimes I'll pop my spackle in the microwave for a few seconds so it's really smooth and easy to spread - especially if I've decided to chill the cake before applying the spackle, which I will do if the cake is mostly raw edges (sculpted, trimmed, etc.). If the spackle is too thick and you apply it to a chilled cake, it will harden before you have a chance to smooth it.

I see cakesrock's technique is different. (Gender assumed) Her method has you crumbcoating (or spackling) a cake that is frozen all the way through then popping it back into the freezer. This is in direct contradiction with my method. Only you can decide which one works best for you.

Cakesrock - My question to you is, if you need to decorate the fondant covered cake, when exactly do you do that? It seems the cake will be sticky virtually all the time.

Also, why so much wrapping of a fondant covered cake? Fondant naturally keeps the cake moist. And only the very outer part of the fondant gets hard. It's still soft where it touches the cake.

Edited to change Cojack to cakesrock. Sheesh... I really need to learn how to read.

Cojack Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 7:27pm
post #7 of 14

Hi again Diane.

I (Cojack) here...I want to cover the cake tiers with the fondant then attach with fondant shapes. Should I do that the same time when I do the initial fondant cover for each tier?

Sorry for sounding 'challenged' I have never used fondant to cover a cake.

Thank again for all your advice. I hope this works.

Jacqueline icon_confused.gif

DianeLM Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 7:46pm
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cojack

Hi again Diane.

I (Cojack) here...I want to cover the cake tiers with the fondant then attach with fondant shapes. Should I do that the same time when I do the initial fondant cover for each tier?

Sorry for sounding 'challenged' I have never used fondant to cover a cake.

Thank again for all your advice. I hope this works.

Jacqueline icon_confused.gif




Hi Jaqueline,

First, I mistakenly attributed to you what was written by cakesrock. I apologize to both of you!

If you're going to use the chilling method, you can wait for the fondant covered cake to be completely dry, depending on how you plan to decorate. If the decorations are simple and don't need a lot of measuring and trimming, you can take advantage of the condensation and stick your fondant accents right onto the cake without adding anything to make them stick.

On the other hand, if you're doing intricate stripes and things that you want to measure against the cake before attaching, wait for the fondant to dry completely so you can 'play' before permanently attaching your fondant accents.

If you're planning to emboss your fondant, wait until the condensation has evaporated, then IMMEDIATELY do your embossing while the fondant is still soft.

Cojack Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 7:56pm
post #9 of 14

No worries Diane.

I appreciate all the advice and pray this will work and meet my expectations.

Thank again.

Cheers.

Jacqueline (Cojack)
icon_biggrin.gif

cakesrock Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 12:14am
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cojack

Thanks Diane for the advice.

I'm freezing the cakes because my only option is to work on it at a later date. Do you think if the bake the cakes, layer and freeze each tier,to complete at a later date would work? I have to bake 8 cakes total to produce a 4 tier cake. I then could crumb coat once the cakes have completely thawed and follow your previous email advice. Yes?

I want my step is to cover with fondant, decorate and then deliver to customer. Assemble tier at customers location.

Is there at all any short steps you would recommend?

Is there a 'Spackle' recipe on the cake central website to crumb coat the cakes?

Thanks again for your help and time.

Jacqueline
icon_confused.gif



You can absolutely fill and layer each tier, then freeze without crumbcoat. I often do that a week or more in advance if I know I won't have as much time to assemble and decorate as I'd like.

Yes, you are correct that you do not want to crumbcoat the cakes right out of the freezer. The condensation that forms as the cake is thawing may cause the crumbcoat to get slimy and slide right off the cake.

There isn't a spackle recipe that I'm aware of. When I make it, I prefer to cut off the sides, top and bottom of my cake layer first. That way, I'm only using the fluffy, crumbly crumbs in the center of the cake and not the gooey or dry outside. This makes a smooth spackle. Gooey pieces will just ball together and make your spackle lumpy.

I crumble the cake into a bowl, then add icing - about 3:1 icing to crumbs. I want it very smooth and loose. Sometimes I'll pop my spackle in the microwave for a few seconds so it's really smooth and easy to spread - especially if I've decided to chill the cake before applying the spackle, which I will do if the cake is mostly raw edges (sculpted, trimmed, etc.). If the spackle is too thick and you apply it to a chilled cake, it will harden before you have a chance to smooth it.

I see cakesrock's technique is different. (Gender assumed) Her method has you crumbcoating (or spackling) a cake that is frozen all the way through then popping it back into the freezer. This is in direct contradiction with my method. Only you can decide which one works best for you.

Cakesrock - My question to you is, if you need to decorate the fondant covered cake, when exactly do you do that? It seems the cake will be sticky virtually all the time.

Also, why so much wrapping of a fondant covered cake? Fondant naturally keeps the cake moist. And only the very outer part of the fondant gets hard. It's still soft where it touches the cake.

Edited to change Cojack to cakesrock. Sheesh... I really need to learn how to read.




Hi Diane: I think my explanation was confusing: I DO crumbcoat right from the freezer and have never had issues. Then I immediately cover in fondant and will re-wrap and re-freeze (due to time). IF I have anymore decorations or painting to do (that can't be frozen, like RI), I will do that AFTER the cake is thawed and no longer tacky to the touch. I thaw it at least 3-4 hours in wrapping, then unwrap, air dry for 2 hours or so and then finish my decorating. I live in a very dry climate, so perhaps this is why it works! Hope that explains! icon_smile.gif Yes, everyone has different techniques and you do find what works for you. I have tried different ways and like this one (mostly for my lifestyle!)
Terri- gender assumption was correct.

DianeLM Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 1:37am
post #11 of 14

Terri, thanks for the explanation. It's so interesting how diametrically opposed techniques will work. I suppose there are so many variables, none of us is really working in identical conditions to anyone else.

Sometimes I think I was smarter when I didn't know as much. Ignorance can be bliss! icon_smile.gif

MelissaS12 Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 3:22am
post #12 of 14

This is really great advice. My question is how long can you freeze a cake for?

cakesrock Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 5:34am
post #13 of 14

I don't freeze longer than 6-8 weeks, but I mostly freeze for 2-4 weeks. I don't have a lot of freezer space so it's a revolving door! Make sure you wrap it well. Maybe others freeze longer? And just ensure there aren't any strong odors in your freezer. HTH

cakesrock Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 5:36am
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

Terri, thanks for the explanation. It's so interesting how diametrically opposed techniques will work. I suppose there are so many variables, none of us is really working in identical conditions to anyone else.

Sometimes I think I was smarter when I didn't know as much. Ignorance can be bliss! icon_smile.gif




I totally agree! icon_smile.gif

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