Dipping Fresh Flower Stems In Wax. Yes? No?

Decorating By _Jamie_ Updated 7 May 2014 , 6:03pm by pursuing_perfection

_Jamie_ Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:26pm
post #1 of 18

I just saw this suggested on a site online. Dipping the ends of flowers into wax before laying on or inserting in to cake. Anyone do this? Beeswax....too soft? Paraffin/canning wax....hmmmm. I have wondered this myself at times.

Thoughts?

17 replies
snowboarder Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:36pm
post #2 of 18

I tried this once a long time ago. Once being the key word.

The last thing I needed to be doing right before delivery is trying to keep paraffin wax at the right temperature to get an even coat of paraffin on a bunch of flower stems.

But that's just me.

KHalstead Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:40pm
post #3 of 18

I dip them in candy melts.........they don't melt too easily and obviously it's food safe. then you have no fears about popping the rose stems (or other non toxic flowers) directly into the cake and no worries about having to fish for little straws

_Jamie_ Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:41pm
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowboarder

I tried this once a long time ago. Once being the key word.

The last thing I needed to be doing right before delivery is trying to keep paraffin wax at the right temperature to get an even coat of paraffin on a bunch of flower stems.

But that's just me.




icon_lol.gif Oh hey, I've got patience for some stuff. I nearly went blind handpainting letters on gumpaste last weekend, but it was perfect dammit! I sat still and gritted my teeth and got er done! icon_lol.gif

So, no, I would totally dredge up the patience for it. So the wax stuck, and worked, and didn't come off in the cake when the flowers were removed? I am not shoving posy picks into cake anymore. Crater making plastic crap! And wrapping stems in tape...that is almost as disgusting as leaving them naked, as far as I'm concerned. Gross stuff starts peeling off....ugh.

_Jamie_ Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:43pm
post #5 of 18

K-thanks....I could do that too. I know I've seen people do that as well.

snowboarder Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:44pm
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Jamie_

icon_lol.gif Oh hey, I've got patience for some stuff. I nearly went blind handpainting letters on gumpaste last weekend, but it was perfect dammit! I sat still and gritted my teeth and got er done! icon_lol.gif

So, no, I would totally dredge up the patience for it. So the wax stuck, and worked, and didn't come off in the cake when the flowers were removed?




I have absolutely no idea if it works because I gave up after about a half dozen. I have NO patience whatsoever for that sort of thing. icon_biggrin.gif

_Jamie_ Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:45pm
post #7 of 18

Lol! Yeah....I figured.

Texas_Rose Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:58pm
post #8 of 18

The only thing about heating wax, the candle kind anyhow, is that you have to use a double boiler or it will catch fire. My mom used to make candles when I was a kid and she used to buy the soft wicks sometimes and dip them in wax to stiffen them...it was easy and seems like it would be the same. When you think about it, we stick birthday candles into cakes all the time and no one ever sits there and goes, "Is that food safe?"

_Jamie_ Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:03pm
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

The only thing about heating wax, the candle kind anyhow, is that you have to use a double boiler or it will catch fire. My mom used to make candles when I was a kid and she used to buy the soft wicks sometimes and dip them in wax to stiffen them...it was easy and seems like it would be the same. When you think about it, we stick birthday candles into cakes all the time and no one ever sits there and goes, "Is that food safe?"




OMG. Duh! Candles! Of course it's ok! icon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif

badkitty Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:48pm
post #10 of 18

hmmm....what about soy wax, it melts at a much lower temp and is easy to clean up...just use hot soapy water.

SandiOh Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 10:52pm
post #11 of 18

How do the flowers like it? Has it any effect on how long the roses stay fresh?

KHalstead Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 2:47pm
post #12 of 18

I haven't tried wax, but I dip the flower stems in candy melts the night before usually and the flowers don't ever look any different the next day.........roses will sometimes open a little bit but I think they do that regardless.

pursuing_perfection Posted 7 May 2014 , 1:33am
post #13 of 18

Quote:

Originally Posted by KHalstead 

I haven't tried wax, but I dip the flower stems in candy melts the night before usually and the flowers don't ever look any different the next day.........roses will sometimes open a little bit but I think they do that regardless.


What is the longest that you have kept the flowers after they have been dipped in the candy melts?  I would need the flowers to look good for almost 2 days after inserting them into the cake.  (Long story...and it is complicated.)

Mimimakescakes Posted 7 May 2014 , 3:14am
post #14 of 18

Quote:

Originally Posted by pursuing_perfection 
 


What is the longest that you have kept the flowers after they have been dipped in the candy melts?  I would need the flowers to look good for almost 2 days after inserting them into the cake.  (Long story...and it is complicated.)

Then your best bet is to use sugar flowers. You should NEVER insert flowers or wires directly into a cake. 

pursuing_perfection Posted 7 May 2014 , 4:48am
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimimakescakes 
 

Then your best bet is to use sugar flowers. You should NEVER insert flowers or wires directly into a cake. 

I was asked to use real flowers, so sugar flowers aren't an option.  I DO AGREE that wires and flower stems should never go directly into a cake.  However, properly wrapped and covered wires and flowers CAN go into cakes (just not too many).  I was hoping someone could tell me how long the flowers would look good.  I had planned to put the roses in flower picks with a small amount of water...but was wondering how long organically grown, pesticide free daisies with their stems properly coated in candy melts would last.  Maybe I will PM KHalstead if (s)he does not respond to this thread...

pursuing_perfection Posted 7 May 2014 , 4:49am
post #16 of 18

p.s.  The cake would be in a cooler for most of the 2 days.

Mimimakescakes Posted 7 May 2014 , 6:05am
post #17 of 18

You are the decorator and you have the right to say no . Just because a client asks does not mean they can have it. I would be worried about bacteria growing in the water over that period of time , organic , pesticide free or not the risk of  contamination in a food product over two days is just too great. 

pursuing_perfection Posted 7 May 2014 , 6:03pm
post #18 of 18

I talked to the florist, and she said that roses and daisies should be fine for at least 24 hours out of water, since they are in the cooler for most of that time.  Wrapping the stems and then inserting them in straws should help them to last for up to 2 days.  I will not try the melted chocolate method this time to be safe.  IF I have leftover flowers, I may try one and let it sit on my counter to sit what happens.  (And then I will post the results here.)  Thanks for your input.  

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