lomfise Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:15pm
post #1 of

First, thank you to all those who are willing to share their recipes with the rest of us. I do appreciate this.

However, since this site is worldwide, I would very much like if you could write the proper measurements in the recipes instead of just 1 can of... or 1 package of...
The packages and cans have different sizes all over the world.

At the moment, I would like to try this recipe, http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6851/thick-caramel-sauce-or-filling but I don't know how much is in a can of condensed milk, so if anyone knows, please tell.

Thanks again. icon_biggrin.gif

93 replies
Mensch Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:20pm
post #2 of

I think the standard is 14 ounces.

all4cake Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:38pm
post #3 of

I ain't trying to be a smart butt, but I've only ever seen one size can of that stuff.

lomfise Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:15pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

I ain't trying to be a smart butt, but I've only ever seen one size can of that stuff.




I realise that in America there is probably only a standard size icon_biggrin.gif but I live in Denmark where condensed milk is practically impossible to find, so I have to make it myself. icon_lol.gif

Most cans, packages, containers, bags etc have the weight written on somewhere, and its that I'm looking for, it would be such a great help.

all4cake Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:18pm
post #5 of

"I seeeeeeee." said the blind man.

prterrell Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:20pm
post #6 of

Wow! You can't get sweetened condensed milk in Denmark? That sucks, dude. Seriously. Anyway, yes 14 ounces is the standard for that one. I guess we Americans really are bad about not realizing that things we find to be commonplace are only so here.

Interested to know how you make sweetened condensed milk yourself....

lomfise Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:49pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Wow! You can't get sweetened condensed milk in Denmark? That sucks, dude. Seriously. Anyway, yes 14 ounces is the standard for that one. I guess we Americans really are bad about not realizing that things we find to be commonplace are only so here.

Interested to know how you make sweetened condensed milk yourself....




You'd be surprised how many of the things I see in recipes here on CC that are impossible to find in Denmark; coffee dreamers, instant jello, pudding mixes, strawberry flavored gelatin, strawberry flavoured cream cheese, bettercreme, shortening, pumkin puree, and all those extracts always mentioned. I can get vanilla, almond and rum extracts.

Also pecans, macadamias and cashews are incredibly expensive because they have to be imported. icon_confused.gif

To make sweetned condensed milk you let 1 liter of whole milk and 300g of cane sugar simmer for about an hour over low heat till it is reduced to about 3/4. (Not sure if cane sugar is the right term, but it's what my dictionary says icon_biggrin.gif )

Another thing about measurements is that everything here is weighed, all of my Danish recipes are in kilos and grams, liquids in litres and decilitre. It is quite easy to convert cups to grams, but not cans and packages. Thanks again. thumbs_up.gif

indydebi Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 7:01pm
post #8 of

I am so glad to see this thread because that is on my list of Things That Totally Pi$$ Me Off! People who don't know how to properly write a recipe. icon_mad.gif

I've noticed that things like "one stick of butter" is foreign to non-Americans. And I've noticed that a lot of americans have no idea that 1 stick is 1/2 cup or 1/4 pound. icon_confused.gif

"One Capful" depends on what size bottle or jar you're using. I bought vegetable oil in 30 pound jugs. I guarantee you that my "capful of oil" was WAY bigger than a housewife's "capful of oil". icon_eek.gif

Using brand names instead of what it is. I used the example of "one cup of Jif (or Jiffy)" in a peanut butter cookie recipe and a CC'er came back laughing because in her country, "Jif" was a toilet cleaner! icon_lol.gif In some of my old cookbooks, there are recipes with brands of items that either went out of business 50 years ago or the brand is unique to a certain region of the country. So I can't even try to substitute because I dont' know if it's peanut butter or toilet cleaner! icon_lol.gif

In my lifetime, I've edited some cookbooks (company cookbooks with recipes from employees) and you can't believe how many recipes I'd have to correct and sometimes just flat out track the person down to ask "what the hell does this mean?" icon_confused.gif

prterrell Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 7:09pm
post #9 of

oh, yeah, indydebi, most people cannot write a recipe for anything (not that I'm perfect, but I do try to be aware of what and how icon_biggrin.gif ). we have a huge collection of cookbooks that we do not use as a result of friends and family giving us company and church cookbooks as presents (because they know we both like to cook). most of, if not all, the recipes in those books are useless to us, either because they are so poorly written or because we actually want to cook something, not mix a can of condensed soup with two other kinds of pre-packaged food (i'm sorry, but that's not cooking!). my husband's cousin put together a family cookbook the other year. no one will use any of the recipes I submitted because they're all "too hard", meaning that they are actually recipes for cooking from scratch, not mixing pre-packaged stuff together.

kiwigal81 Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 7:15pm

We can't get loads of things here either. I get so excited about a recipe, then it calls for things we don't have.
Here is a link to a quick condensed milk with milk powder. Always worked fine for me. Use fine caster sugar, I had a wee bit undissolved. Better after a couple of days.

http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/sweetenedcondensedmilk.htm

Melvira Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 7:36pm

Actually, where I'm at (In America) there are about 3 sizes of sweetened condensed milk, so I'm with you! CONFUSED!! icon_wink.gif

And Debi, I hear you on the slang and substitutions confusion. You can tell how old a recipe is if it calls for oleo. I am pretty sure that is butter or margarine because my grandma used to say that, but man, talk about something you may NOT be able to guess accurately. And the rest of the recipe may not exactly give it away, depending on what it is, and how familiar you are with that type of cooking! icon_rolleyes.gif

Personally I have trouble with metric measurements. I'm one of those silly American girls who never really learned it. Thank goodness for the internet where you can look that stuff up, and for places that will even 'translate' a recipe for you!

prterrell Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 7:42pm

Oleo was one of, if not the first, brand of margarine, so for a while it was synomous with margarine. Many of the recipes I got handed down from my grandmothers have oleo as an ingredient. I just use butter instead and have never had a problem. Margarine is not allowed in my house. I don't even use vegetable shortening unless there really is no other choice and I try very hard to find a way around it. I use butter and lard in pie crust and biscuits now. It's actually healthier for you!

Melvira Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 7:42pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

oh, yeah, indydebi, most people cannot write a recipe for anything (not that I'm perfect, but I do try to be aware of what and how icon_biggrin.gif ). we have a huge collection of cookbooks that we do not use as a result of friends and family giving us company and church cookbooks as presents (because they know we both like to cook). most of, if not all, the recipes in those books are useless to us, either because they are so poorly written or because we actually want to cook something, not mix a can of condensed soup with two other kinds of pre-packaged food (i'm sorry, but that's not cooking!). my husband's cousin put together a family cookbook the other year. no one will use any of the recipes I submitted because they're all "too hard", meaning that they are actually recipes for cooking from scratch, not mixing pre-packaged stuff together.




Amen sister!! If I wanted semi-homemade I'd be hanging out with Sadnra Lee. I mean, sometimes in a pinch it's great, but for the most part, blech.

Caths_Cakes Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 9:22pm

if i remember rightly, i bought a can of carnation condensed milk the other day, it was a 379g tin, i think it worked to about 12oz, Give or take a few. although i have seen them in larger tins

tonedna Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 9:38pm

I am one of the confused ones...for example..they say one box of pudding mix..Wich size small or family size.. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

greengyrl26 Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 9:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by lomfise

You'd be surprised how many of the things I see in recipes here on CC that are impossible to find in Denmark; coffee dreamers, instant jello, pudding mixes, strawberry flavored gelatin, strawberry flavoured cream cheese, bettercreme, shortening, pumkin puree, and all those extracts always mentioned. I can get vanilla, almond and rum extracts.




Wow. You can't get instant jello? pudding mixes? shortening? My goodness! Can you get lemon extract? Raspberry? That just makes me sad! You want us to send you a big old goody package with all the stuff we have and take for granted? icon_wink.gif

prterrell Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 10:13pm

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think pudding as we know it here in the US is really eaten outside of the the US (maybe is in Canada?).

As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not.

Vegetable shortening is called vegetable fat in other places (I know there is at least one brand of it in the UK and in Australia, not sure about other countries), but is still pretty uncommon, I think most of the things we use it for in the US aren't eaten or are traditionally made with other fats (butter or lard I'm guessing).

Are pumpkins and other squashes (other than zucchini/courgettes) eaten outside the Americas? Or are canned veg just not as common outside of the US?

I know a lot of what we find commonplace here in the US isn't in other places (and visa versa), but then things like sweetened condensed milk and various extracts I would think would be available in Europe. Are you able to order from online sources, such as Lorann's and have it shipped, or are the shipping costs prohibitive?

I wonder if it's easier to get things that are more common in Europe here in the US than the other way round? For example, if I want Devon (clotted) cream, there are stores here in the US that import it, but I guess other than at US military commissaries, many US food products aren't shipped overseas?

AverageMom Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 10:32pm

My mother often sends me recipes, which is great, but she is writing them down from her memory. So, I have a recipe for a cornbread which says "Heat oven until hot" and "bake for 20 minutes. Or 40. Check and see, when it's done take it out". Her most famous recipe was for a soup called "Hodge-Podge". I loved it as a child, but I think she must have made it up. Her recipe says: "Cook potatoes and other hard vegs. Add beans, corn, etc. Don't forget the milk."

Melvira Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 11:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by AverageMom

My mother often sends me recipes, which is great, but she is writing them down from her memory. So, I have a recipe for a cornbread which says "Heat oven until hot" and "bake for 20 minutes. Or 40. Check and see, when it's done take it out". Her most famous recipe was for a soup called "Hodge-Podge". I loved it as a child, but I think she must have made it up. Her recipe says: "Cook potatoes and other hard vegs. Add beans, corn, etc. Don't forget the milk."




Yup... that's known as a 'dump cook'. I am GREAT at that. Just pulling *whatever* out of the pantry and fridge and turning it into something really tasty! That's how much mom gives me her 'recipes'. "Take some milk... you know... 'some'." "Mix in some flour until it looks right." That sort of thing. Fortunately I've become a great translator of those types of recipes!! thumbs_up.gif

JodieF Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 11:11pm

Well, that is my recipe.... icon_biggrin.gif I think the people that are saying there are 3 sizes of cans are thinking of evaporated milk, not sweetened condensed milk....and there is a big difference between the two.
I'm sorry I didn't think "internationally". A can of sweetened condensed milk is 14 ounces here in the States. I've never seen another size for as long as I've grocery shopped.
If I Google it, it says that 14 ounces is the equivalent of 397 grams.

My apologies. No frustration intended. That caramel is fabulous. I hope you enjoy it.

Jodie

Melnick Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 11:31pm

In Australia, Condensed milk is around 390 - 400g tins. I've noticed them sneakily reducing the contents when I go to make a recipe (the cookbooks I use always give the weight).

I have to admit that I haven't tried any of the recipes on CC because I can't translate them easily. We also don't have most of the things you have. I was really excited about that gourmet flavours thread until I looked at the recipes and realised that I didn't understand half of what was in them or couldn't get my hands on the products. My cousin's new wife (a gorgeous gal from Kentucky) has also told me that you have different cup sizes for wet and dry ingredients which just further adds to my confusion.

JGMB Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 11:42pm

Another reason to write the size of the can or box, like 14 oz., is that manufacturers often up and change the size of the can on you!! I have lots of recipes that call for a 15 oz. can of something or other, but now they've reduced that product to 14 oz. It may not sound like a big difference, but it can be . . . the finished recipe might be really dry.

erinalicia Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 12:01am

wow..... didn't realize I'd read this and get somewhat offended. Personally, I like "semi-homemade" and I don't care to have someone tell me that it isn't cooking because I happen to use a can of condensed soup in one of my recipes. If I stand over a stove with various ingredients and put together a meal... that's cooking. I don't have time nor do I even care to spend all day cooking something completely from scratch just to have my 2 year old turn his nose up to it.

prterrell Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 12:03am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melnick

My cousin's new wife (a gorgeous gal from Kentucky) has also told me that you have different cup sizes for wet and dry ingredients which just further adds to my confusion.




This is true! There are dry cup measures and liquid cup measures. I don't know the history behind it, and until I started really getting into baking, I never questioned it. It just was how it is. Then I learned that we Americans are the only ones doing it this dumb way. icon_rolleyes.gif

KoryAK Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 12:42am

They are the same size measures... it's just that "dry" measuring cups you fill allll the way to the top so you can scrape off and "wet" measuring cups are more like the clear type with incremental lines that are taller than the highest line. I think the theory is that wet ingredients will meniscus (bulge) up over the top while still being contained and throw off your recipe. I use them interchangeably cause I'm a rebel like that icon_smile.gif

ApplegumKitchen Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 12:57am
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think pudding as we know it here in the US is really eaten outside of the the US (maybe is in Canada?).

As for fruit-flavored gelatin (which is what Jello is), I have no idea if that is something that is eaten outside the US/NA or not. We have flavoured gelatine packets here - but they are called JELLY (which gets confusing when YOU have Peanut Butter & Jelly - which we would call JAM)
Vegetable shortening is called vegetable fat in other places (I know there is at least one brand of it in the UK and in Australia, not sure about other countries), but is still pretty uncommon, I think most of the things we use it for in the US aren't eaten or are traditionally made with other fats (butter or lard I'm guessing).

Are pumpkins and other squashes (other than zucchini/courgettes) eaten outside the Americas? Or are canned veg just not as common outside of the US? YEP!! We eat these in Australia but more as a vegetable with say a Roast dinner! AND NEVER canned!! LOL - you can't buy canned pumpkin here!

I know a lot of what we find commonplace here in the US isn't in other places (and visa versa), but then things like sweetened condensed milk and various extracts I would think would be available in Europe. Are you able to order from online sources, such as Lorann's and have it shipped, or are the shipping costs prohibitive?

I wonder if it's easier to get things that are more common in Europe here in the US than the other way round? For example, if I want Devon (clotted) cream, there are stores here in the US that import it, but I guess other than at US military commissaries, many US food products aren't shipped overseas?




Hey we have GOLDEN SYRUP!! woo hoo - makes the best caramel mudcake!

Have noticed that LOTS of US recipes contain purchased "Prepared ingredients" - we are lucky (I think) that we haven't gone down that path here yet (sure it WILL come) - most here still use raw ingredients (butter, sugar, flour eggs, milk etc) Packet mixes are NOT cost effective - they range from $4- $6 a packet and you STILL need to add eggs, butter/oil, milk !)

Melvira Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 1:36am
Quote:
Originally Posted by JodieF

Well, that is my recipe.... icon_biggrin.gif I think the people that are saying there are 3 sizes of cans are thinking of evaporated milk, not sweetened condensed milk....and there is a big difference between the two.




Nope, I have at least 2 sizes of the sweetened condensed! icon_lol.gif But oh yah, BIG difference in those two. Blech, would not be good to use the evap when it calls for sweet-cond!! icon_razz.gif

prterrell Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 1:47am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumKitchen

Have noticed that LOTS of US recipes contain purchased "Prepared ingredients" - we are lucky (I think) that we haven't gone down that path here yet (sure it WILL come) - most here still use raw ingredients (butter, sugar, flour eggs, milk etc) Packet mixes are NOT cost effective - they range from $4- $6 a packet and you STILL need to add eggs, butter/oil, milk !)




Yes, sadly, people think anything that involves mixing a couple packets and cans of stuff together and heating it up = cooking. A friend of mine actually thinks sticking a Stouffer's lasagna in the oven is "cooking". Unfortunatley, real cooking seems to be something most people in this country don't do anymore.

Yes, I AM a food snob and darned proud of it, too!

Melvira Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 1:53am

Hey, there have been plenty of times I WISHED they'd have just used a Stouffer's lasagna!! icon_wink.gif

prterrell Posted 20 Jan 2010 , 1:55am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melvira

Hey, there have been plenty of times I WISHED they'd have just used a Stouffer's lasagna!! icon_wink.gif




icon_lol.gif sad, but true! icon_rolleyes.gif

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