Crumbly Cake No Matter What I Try. Help!

Baking By cmehappy Updated 19 Jan 2010 , 7:14pm by cmehappy

cmehappy Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 4:47am
post #1 of 14

I have been trying to make cakes that don't crumble when I frost them or crumb coat them and I cannot seem to find a recipe that works. I could really use some help.

13 replies
LaBellaFlor Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 5:19am
post #2 of 14

Can we see the recipe your using. Are you greesing you cake pans real good?And exactly what do you mean by "crumble"? Do they fall apart or just get a lot of crumbs?

cmehappy Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:33pm
post #3 of 14

I've used this recipe

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/1977/cake-mix-extender

regular box mix, and a scratch cake recipe

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups white sugar
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup milk
  
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 eggs
Directions:
1.   Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease and flour one 9x13 inch pan. Mix together the flour, baking powder and salt; set aside.
2.   In a large bowl, cream sugar and shortening until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition. Add flour mixture alternately with milk, beating just to combine. finally, stir in vanilla. Pour batter into the prepared pan.
3.   Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 40 to 45 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the cake comes out clean.


I grease the pans with baking spray that has flour in it. It works really well.
It seems when ever I start frosting my cakes they tear and get lots of crumbs as soon as I touch them with the frosting.

Is there a step I may be missing? Should I freeze them first?

Mike1394 Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:50pm
post #4 of 14

I see why it's dry. It's a crap recipe. First do you like the shortening instead of butter?

You need to increase your liquids. Go a 1/4 C more on the milk, and sugar. That should help a lot. Add your vanilla to your milk. No reason to add extra mixing time. You can even add another egg if you wish.

Mike

cmehappy Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:03pm
post #5 of 14

Thanks Mike. Is that good for carving too? I really like to do the carved cakes, but as you can imagine they are hard to make with a cake that crumbles.

Mike1394 Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:08pm
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmehappy

Thanks Mike. Is that good for carving too? I really like to do the carved cakes, but as you can imagine they are hard to make with a cake that crumbles.




For carving I wouldn't put in an extra egg. Good Luck

Mike

cmehappy Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:09pm
post #7 of 14

Thank you. I have been so frustrated by this.

Mike1394 Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:14pm
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmehappy

Thank you. I have been so frustrated by this.




For the future, keep in mind. Egg yolks are tenderizers, egg whites are tougheners, sugar is a liquid, milk is a tenderizer, flour toughener

Mike

cmehappy Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:23pm
post #9 of 14

Ok. I missed answering one of you questions though. I don't like to use shortening for cakes or frosting. It just seems wrong to me. I usually use butter. I just put the recipe as written.

LaBellaFlor Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:34pm
post #10 of 14

Just saw this again and oh yeah, that is a crap recipe. Good luck with the new one.

Sagebrush Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 4:16pm
post #11 of 14

Re: it being a crap recipe (and I'm not saying it's not... I don't have nearly enough baking experience to analyse it)...

I went to the recipe itself and it's reviews are at 9.0 out of 10 with 139 reviewers.

Granted, that's nothing like WASC, but I wonder how so many are getting good results with it. Maybe it's a humidity or altitude thing?

- Leisel

Mike1394 Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:37pm
post #12 of 14

It might have also been raining when those 9 baked it. icon_biggrin.gif

Mike

LaBellaFlor Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 6:41pm
post #13 of 14

Just to give an idea of scratch baking. You use shortening in pie crust to achieve a flaky crust, not a desired effect in cakes. I can see how suing shortening would make it crumbly where as butter will get that fine crumb. Now butter in pie crust has a good flavor, but does not benefit the texture at all.

cmehappy Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 7:14pm
post #14 of 14

Thanks everyone. I am looking forward to trying this out. I appreciate all the help.

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