What Is Your Policy Re "outside" Sheetcakes?

Business By llbesq Updated 4 Aug 2010 , 3:40pm by leah_s

llbesq Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 9:15pm
post #1 of 45

I have been approached about setting up an appointment to discuss a wedding cake for approximately 300. The brief conversation at church yesterday raised several pre-meeting issues for me, one of which is "outside", i.e., Costco, sheetcakes. The MOB mentioned that her daughter knows the design she wants (good icon_smile.gif) and they would like a three tier cake for cutting and then to have some sheetcakes from Costco in the kitchen to supplement the three tier cake to feed all of the guests. My policy is that I do not provide the wedding cake in this circumstance. My main rationale is that my reputation is on the line, both as to the look and taste of the cake, as well as expertise in advising the customer on the number of serving necessary to feed the expected guests.

I would appreciate input from others about your policy on outside cakes. Just want to know if I am "in the norm" on this matter. TIA!

44 replies
_Jamie_ Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 9:16pm
post #2 of 45

Won't do it. I won't have my elegant creations served next to a sh*&cake. I specifically prohibit this in my contract. And if anyone thinks that's uppity or snobby...well ok then. icon_biggrin.gif

icon_rolleyes.gif Edited to add the following: The previous reference to sh*&cakes is not a general blanket condemnation of a cake simply for it's shape, or general flat appearance. I have seen seriously awesome sheetcakes that I couldn't pull off if I tried. Just making light of people that think it's ok to have a grand elegant cake for half of the guests, and dumpy ugly sh*&cake for the other half. Like they don't know the difference. How insulting. You may now return to your regular programming. icon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif

llbesq Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 9:18pm
post #3 of 45

I forgot to mention that I also have a clause in my contract as Jamie mentioned in her reply.

jammjenks Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 9:25pm
post #4 of 45

I won't allow it either.

LaBellaFlor Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 9:40pm
post #5 of 45

Quality control issue, so NO! Think about it. What if someone gets sick from the sheetcake and they blame you. And do you want someone tasting a Costco cake and think you made that cake? And it is also in my contract, No sheetcakes.

Renaejrk Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 9:47pm
post #6 of 45

no way! There is no way I would want anyone to think a Wal-mart cake was mine! They may not realize that they probably don't need the cake to serve as many as they think - the 60% rule or whatever you call it.

artscallion Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 9:52pm
post #7 of 45

Same here. Don't allow it.

CakeForte Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:00pm
post #8 of 45

Personally...I would drop the liability bomb on this one. Someone could get sick from the other cake and blame it on you.

brincess_b Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:01pm
post #9 of 45

if you get the chance, explain to the woman the difference between a sheet cake (either costos or your own) and a kitchen cake - which is what she should really be having as extra cutting cake.
xx

FromScratch Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:01pm
post #10 of 45

Not allowed here either. My rep is on the line... no way I'm having people think that costoc cake is my cake. I have it written in my conract tht if I get there and there are other cakes there that I will leave with their cake and they forfeit all monies paid.

tarheelgirl Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:06pm
post #11 of 45

I don't do this either! And besides have you ever TASTED that nasty icing? ughh

BlakesCakes Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:08pm
post #12 of 45

No way.

Costco cakes are very good, but also easily recognized. My cakes are also very good, but very different from Costco's. I don't want the confusion. The last thing I need is for someone from that type of wedding to come to me later on and ask for a cake "exactly like the one's they served at the reception"..................

If they're that committed to Costco sheet cakes for 300, then they need to order a dummy cake for display (at least 80% the cost of a real cake), perhaps with a real slice inserted for the cutting ceremony (or just fake it).

JMHO
Rae

leah_s Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:13pm
post #13 of 45

Not allowed, no way no how.

tarheelgirl Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:18pm
post #14 of 45

The Costco cake I had was with this whipped icing stuff. It was not very appetizing, however, It may just be that I'm used to my yummy icing.

snarkybaker Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:38pm
post #15 of 45

It's a liability issue. What if someone claims they got sick from " the cake" ? That means everybody goes to court until the issue is sorted out, and I don't build enough profit into my cakes to cover lawyer fees for someone elses cake.

Now in my state it is easy to argue because we operate under a license from the health department, and home bakers are allowed to bake without regular inspections. Its easy to say that I am just not willing to share liability with a hobbiest. I have too much to lose.

After 100 servings, we will make " kitchen cakes" that are about 2/3 the cost of our decorated cakes, but it's in my contract if I see dessert from a facility I haven't pre-approved of, I take my toys and go home with no refund!

Deb_ Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 10:51pm
post #16 of 45

Of course there's always the chance that the Costco sheeetcakes will be brought in after the fact and we'll never know they even existed. icon_rolleyes.gif

I also wonder how anyone can tell if they became sick from the shrimp cocktail or the wedding cake. I guess they'd need a sample of everything served at the wedding for testing.

Anyway.....It also states in my contract that my cake is the only cake allowed at the reception.

I've often wondered though if this has always been the case.

Some things are out of my control I guess.

llbesq Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 11:02pm
post #17 of 45

dkelly- you are right about some things being out of our control after we deliver the cake. At least I know up front in this situation an estimated head count. If they want to order cake for 100 from me when expecting approximately 300, then I can guess what the plan will be with regard to other cakes.

Thanks for all the comments and input. Although my contract says my cake will be the only cake, I like the added language about removing the cake if, upon delivery, other cakes are at the venue and forfeiting all monies.

prterrell Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:08am
post #18 of 45

So if you're an A list guest you get the good cake and if you're B list you get the costco cake? I feel bad for the guests at her wedding! I imagine they might find some of the checks in the cards they get at the wedding have been canceled when they go to cash them! Rude Bride! Bad Bride! No cake for you!

Kitagrl Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:19am
post #19 of 45

I personally think its too much to require "no other cakes".... to me, if they want to hire ten different bakers to make ten different cakes...my only business is to do the cake they ordered from me, and collect whatever money I charged.

I realize there's the thing about "taste" and "reputation" but really if there are 300 people at a wedding...how many of those people are really gonna ask "who made the cake"?

I guess as it is...around here, I do ALOT of groom's cakes for brides who get their cake in their catering package. If I had that rule (no other cakes) I'd have to turn down almost all my groom's cake orders.

YoCake Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:28am
post #20 of 45

I have it in my contract that if they are cutting and serving sheetcakes to supplement the wedding cake we've brought in, then those sheetcakes have to be purchased from us, for quality control reasons and liability issues. This doesn't mean that they can't buy a grooms cake, pastries, or cookies from another bakery....only if it is representing the wedding cake I am providing. Most people totally understand this, and no, it is not snobby.
When this MOB is asked, "Oh, were did the cake come from?, she is not going to answer, oh, the tiered cake is from so and so, and we cheaped out and got sheetcakes from costco. No, she is going to say the whole cake is from your business. I'd watch out....you have to protect yourself and your reputation.
I was victim to, "Oh, I had your cake at so and so's wedding, and it didn't taste any better than a Sam's Club cake." Well, it WAS a Sam's club cake, because that is where they purchased sheetcakes from, while getting the pretty cake from us. I won't go there again......it is very damaging.

indydebi Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:30am
post #21 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

I also wonder how anyone can tell if they became sick from the shrimp cocktail or the wedding cake.



LIke the story I posted on another thread today .... a friend SWORE she had some bad popcorn the night before because she was just so sick today! It couldn't have ANYTHING to do with the fact that she was chugging down Singapore Slings and 7-7's! No-o-o-o-o-o-o-o! It HAD to be "bad popcorn"! icon_eek.gif

Kitagrl Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:30am
post #22 of 45

I can see that...(the Sam's Club cakes post)

And...

"bad popcorn"? That's a new one. haha.

There's also something called the "24 hour virus"....

prterrell Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:36am
post #23 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

There's also something called the "24 hour virus"....




That's actually a mis-nomer. The 24 hour (and 48 hour and 72 hour) stomach viruses are actually all cases of mild food poinsoning.

Kitagrl Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:37am
post #24 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

There's also something called the "24 hour virus"....



That's actually a mis-nomer. The 24 hour (and 48 hour and 72 hour) stomach viruses are actually all cases of mild food poinsoning.




You are kidding right? haha.

prterrell Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:40am
post #25 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

There's also something called the "24 hour virus"....



That's actually a mis-nomer. The 24 hour (and 48 hour and 72 hour) stomach viruses are actually all cases of mild food poinsoning.



You are kidding right? haha.




Nope. Sorry. Not a joke.

HarleyDee Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:50am
post #26 of 45

So if you don't mind me asking, how do you all have the "my cake only" clause written out? Like, specifically what does it say in your contract?

I'm thinking hard about doing this after delivering a bridal and groom's cake to an upscale venue recently, and getting attitude from a friend of the MoG. I walk over to the groom's cake table, and there is an empty cake plate in the middle. Like, one of those clear footed ones. I just set it aside and set the groom's cake up on my cake plateau. Then this woman comes over and says, "Oh, is the cake going in the MIDDLE of the table?" and I say, "Yes, that's where it usually goes."

I didn't know what she was going on about until later I saw her bring in a cheesecake and set it up next to the cake. I guess she thought her cheesecake should be front and center, and the groom's cake could be stuck in wherever.

indydebi Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:50am
post #27 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

There's also something called the "24 hour virus"....



That's actually a mis-nomer. The 24 hour (and 48 hour and 72 hour) stomach viruses are actually all cases of mild food poinsoning.



You are kidding right? haha.



Nope. Sorry. Not a joke.


I've heard this also. Definitely not a joke.

Ranks right up there with people who have the sniffles and complain that they "have the flu!" I"ve had the flu. Lost 12 lbs in 7 days because of the flu. I always ask them, "Can you lift your head up off of the FLOOR? Then you DON'T have "the flu"!!!!!!!" icon_mad.gif

Doug Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 1:59am
post #28 of 45

sample clause:

9  Sole Source Requirement
  
9.1  In order to protect its reputation and as a matter of liability insurance requirements, <<insert name of bakery>> will be the sole provider of any/all cakes, edible or display, other pastries and/or confections and expressly prohibits any/all cakes, edible or display, other pastries and/or confections from any other source except <<insert name of bakery>> to be served at the reception.

9.2  Specifically prohibited are any cakes, pastries and/or confections made, supplied and/or donated by any licensed retail baker/bakery including in-store bakery departments of grocery stores or club warehouse stores, any unlicensed, non-retail baker/bakery, hobby baker, or any family member or relative of any bridal party member, guest, or family friend.

9.3  If other source or individual other than <<insert name of bakery>> provides any cake(s), edible or display, pastries, and/or confections, the items ordered from <<insert name of bakery>> will NOT be delivered and ANY MONIES PAID WILL BE FORFEITED. The undelivered items will be disposed of at <<insert name of bakerys>> discretion.

-----
this could easily be modified to apply only to wedding cake and allow for grooms cake to be from another source (granny entwistle?)

cakesbycathy Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:07am
post #29 of 45

I'm with the all or nothing crowd. Either I provide all the cake or none of it. It's in my contract and I tell the bride that if there is other cakes I take my cake and go home.

That being said, I have made an exception to this twice. Both were for sculpted groom's cakes and the wedding cake was part of the bride's catering package.

indydebi Posted 19 Jan 2010 , 2:19am
post #30 of 45

I had a 'no other cakes' clause but would frequently altar contracts to permit a groom's cake ... especially if it was a style of cake that I had no experience in making.

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