Rich...what Does It Mean?

Baking By sweetlayers Updated 18 Jan 2010 , 7:26pm by artscallion

sweetlayers Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 11:38pm
post #1 of 9

OK, so I know that a rich dessert is something that you can't eat a lot of, but what specifically makes a dessert rich? Is it chocolate? Is it sugar? I am looking for a rich chocolate chip cookie and a smack somebody macadamia nut/white chocolate chip cookie. Any suggestions?

TIA

8 replies
Spuddysmom Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 11:46pm
post #2 of 9

I've always equated "rich" with lots of fat, loads of calories!

AngelaM Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 11:53pm
post #3 of 9

"Rich" indicates a very strong sweet flavor, it's most often associated with chocolate but can be used to describe other sweet desserts as well.

JanH Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 12:09am
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spuddysmom

I've always equated "rich" with lots of fat, loads of calories!




thumbs_up.gificon_cry.gificon_lol.gif

Elise87 Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 12:18am
post #5 of 9

yeh to me "rich" is like an extreme of something like really sweet or really strong flavoured whatever that would be. Then the next extreme up from that is called 'sickly' lol

First cake/dessert i think of as being rich is a choc mud cake with ganache, a few bites and i am like 'eeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr' icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

dandelion56602 Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 5:41am
post #6 of 9

A rich dessert?? One I made that would make me finacially independent & never have another money worry icon_lol.gif

sweetlayers Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 5:27pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by dandelion56602

A rich dessert?? One I made that would make me finacially independent & never have another money worry icon_lol.gif




Wouldn't that be ideal!

Win Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 5:47pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spuddysmom

I've always equated "rich" with lots of fat, loads of calories!




True that. Often desserts made with dark chocolate, real butter, heavy cream, and underlying decadence get classified as "rich." It's the subtle layering of flavors (IMHO) that when striking the palate immediately call to mind "rich."

Chocolate chip cookies that combine real butter, two or three chocolates --and often chunks vs. chips-- and various sugars (dark brown, light brown, and granulated) often fall into that category. Simply experimenting in your kitchen will be the best way to find a unique recipe.

Macademia nuts are already a "rich" nut in that they have a higher fat content. White chocolate that contains cocoa butter is a preferable.

HTH

artscallion Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 7:26pm
post #9 of 9

The dictionary defines it as "highly seasoned, fatty, oily, or sweet."

I tend to think of something that's heavy in texture...thick, creamy and, especially, fatty. A chocolate mousse could have the same sweetness and flavor as a chocolate cheesecake. But I'd be more apt to consider the cheesecake rich.

In fact, plain cheesecake is often not overly sweet or strongly flavored. Yet it's one of the first things I think of when I think of rich desserts, along with trifles and . Not to exclude sweetness and flavor from the equation. But, in my mind, they tend to be things that are naturally present in creamy, fatty desserts anyway.

So for chocolate chip cookies, I would find a recipe that uses lots of butter, almost like a blondie recipe. Cooks Illustrated has a good one. And be sure not to overbake them.

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