Turns Out You Can Freeze A Fondant Covered Cake!!!

Decorating By Lovemesomecake Updated 11 Feb 2010 , 4:27pm by janebrophy

Lovemesomecake Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 9:00pm
post #1 of 17

I don't know if anyone remembers, but last weekend I posted a question about freezing a fondant cake. The little girl I made it for got sick at the last minute and the party was cancelled. Anyway, I ended up freezing the cake (covered in mmf) and they had the party yesterday. I took it out on Friday night and let it thaw. In the morning it looked great, no problems there, but the great mystery was TASTE.

The party was on Saturday at 2. I was so nervous the entire time thinking OH GOSH, what is this going to taste like!!! icon_confused.gif

It was GREAT! It was moist, delicious. Everyone raved about it. So...its good to know that in emergencies you CAN freeze a fondant cake! icon_biggrin.gif

16 replies
my_4_dumplins Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 9:09pm
post #2 of 17

Thanks!

HarleyDee Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 2:51am
post #3 of 17

Always good to know icon_smile.gif

Donnabugg Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 5:59am
post #4 of 17

I've heard "yes" and "no's" so it's good to hear from someone who tried it...Thank you. thumbs_up.gif

dandelion56602 Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 6:30am
post #5 of 17

I've had luck w/ MMF too, but I've heard pre made (Satin Ice, Fondx, Pettinice, etc) are no go on freezing or even fridge, but not tried that yet

catlharper Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 8:04am
post #6 of 17

I had good luck on the outsides of the cake, no waterspotting at all, but the inside of the cake, when it thawed out, was too moist. I would freeze again in an emergency but I wouldn't make it a habit.

catlharper Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 8:04am
post #7 of 17

I had good luck on the outsides of the cake, no waterspotting at all, but the inside of the cake, when it thawed out, was too moist. I would freeze again in an emergency but I wouldn't make it a habit.

j_arney Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 2:19pm
post #8 of 17

How did you wrap it? Did it have a lot of delicate detailing to be careful of? Now I wish I had a bigger freezer!! I'm taking a decorating class tomorrow and I have to take a 6" and 8" cake. I was wondering what I would do with it all, but I guess I'll freeze it!!

tirby Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:05pm
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovemesomecake

I don't know if anyone remembers, but last weekend I posted a question about freezing a fondant cake. The little girl I made it for got sick at the last minute and the party was cancelled. Anyway, I ended up freezing the cake (covered in mmf) and they had the party yesterday. I took it out on Friday night and let it thaw. In the morning it looked great, no problems there, but the great mystery was TASTE.

The party was on Saturday at 2. I was so nervous the entire time thinking OH GOSH, what is this going to taste like!!! icon_confused.gif

It was GREAT! It was moist, delicious. Everyone raved about it. So...its good to know that in emergencies you CAN freeze a fondant cake! icon_biggrin.gif




OK so how did you wrap it for freezing? AND how did you thaw it?

janebrophy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:26pm
post #10 of 17

this is exactly the info I've been looking for icon_smile.gif
I am curious too, how you wrapped it, and also, did you use filling?

tirby Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:34pm
post #11 of 17

I actually got a little hwlp on my cake so RIGHT NOW it is sitting on the counter fondant covered with plastic wrap. (yes the good kind). Not detailed yet but...I need this one answered I used Michele Foster fondant and I know it can be frozen. So here is my delema.
MIL passed away last week. so I figured I best get things done asap.Because her funeral is Saturday and all the things to deal with in between.
Well I baked on Monday. Tuesday it took 1/2 hour to carve and crumbcoat (I geuss stress helped get it done ) I covered it in Fondant today another 1/2 hour. I planned on this taking longer ITS NOT DUE TILL FRIDAY NIGHT!!!!
So what do I do?
If I put it in the fridge when would I take it out to finish the decorations. its a baby dinosaur.. I need to do spots spines and eyes and a little airbrushing ...oh and toes too
. I can not work at night except today but do I want to do anymore now ...What would all of you do?? I don't think the cake could sit out that long? It is a WASC cake made with a mix...

BlakesCakes Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 10:49pm
post #12 of 17

I think that the key to having a good result after freezing is the process you use for wrapping and defrosting.

I find that if you box the room temp cake, wrap the box at least twice with saran wrap and then again with aluminum foil, freeze, then defrost still wrapped in the fridge, and then allow to come to room temp still boxed AND WRAPPED, you can't even tell that the cake was ever in the freezer.

This is NEVER my regular practice, but I've had several people do this because I was going to be out of town when they needed the cake, and every one of them has been happy with the results. I do all of the boxing & wrapping and give them written instructions about how to defrost. I've never had any problems with bleeding colors, oozing, or decorations falling off.

HTH
Rae

janebrophy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 11:36pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

I think that the key to having a good result after freezing is the process you use for wrapping and defrosting.

I find that if you box the room temp cake, wrap the box at least twice with saran wrap and then again with aluminum foil, freeze, then defrost still wrapped in the fridge, and then allow to come to room temp still boxed AND WRAPPED, you can't even tell that the cake was ever in the freezer.

This is NEVER my regular practice, but I've had several people do this because I was going to be out of town when they needed the cake, and every one of them has been happy with the results. I do all of the boxing & wrapping and give them written instructions about how to defrost. I've never had any problems with bleeding colors, oozing, or decorations falling off.

HTH
Rae




This is exactly my situation! I've given my customer the option, still not sure if she'll take it or not, but if she does, I'll definitely use your method. Just to clarify, you don't wrap the cake at all, just the box it's in?

kikibakes Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 11:50pm
post #14 of 17

good to know! thanks for sharing!

BlakesCakes Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 11:50pm
post #15 of 17

No, I don't wrap the cake itself.

I was originally taught to do that with buttercream cakes, but it just seems to be tempting fate. I was told to freeze the cake and to then wrap it in saran, then box, wrap, freeze, defrost in fridge, remove wrapping, but when I did this, the saran around the cake itself marred the surface after defrosting.

I've done it "my way" many times and never had marred icing. The idea is to keep condensation from forming when you defrost. That's the culprit that creates water spots, bleeding, etc. If you've covered the box with saran and foil, the room air can't get at the cake, so the opportunity for condensation to form is near zero.

Rae

JustToEatCake Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 2:14am
post #16 of 17

I had a great result with this also. I wrapped it really well, several times in the press and seal cling wrap, then foil, then double plastic bag. Then thawed on the counter in the wrap. Worked perfectly!

janebrophy Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 4:27pm
post #17 of 17

Great! The customer would rather have me do the cake & freeze it, than go elsewhere. What a compliment! icon_smile.gif
I'll use this method for sure!

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