Some Questions About Chocolate Ganache

Decorating By nadia0411 Updated 6 Mar 2010 , 6:24am by bchumley

nadia0411 Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 7:58am
post #1 of 14

Hi everyone,
I had some questions regarding chocolate and ganache. Irecently discovered a baker/decoraters ingredients supply shop which sells in bulk/wholesale.
I usuaylly use hersheys semi-sweet for ganache but was thinking if i could buy a single large block of couverture chocolate of 5 kg which will be really cheap for me. Now i have two questions:
1. Is buying a large block feasible?, previously i had issues with melting chocolate. when i boiled cream and poured it over chocolate pieces, chocolate didnt melt completely, should i melt before adding cream or should i cook the mixture over double boiler? Should i chop chocolate incase i am buying large block?

2. What is the best combo to use, dark or light? Which one should i buy? Does it depend on taste/preference? i know the chocolate cream ratio needs to be altered when using dark/bittersweet/semi-sweet and milk/light chocolate. May be dark goes better under very sweet fondant. Dark here is 60% and light is 33% what i am talking about.

3. Is there any difference between dark, semit-sweet and bittersweet chocolate?

Thanks in advance.

Regards,
Nadia

13 replies
Thanksharla Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 10:38am
post #2 of 14

I have no advice for you but would also like tp know the answers.

Bunsen Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 10:48am
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by nadia0411


1. Is buying a large block feasible?, previously i had issues with melting chocolate. when i boiled cream and poured it over chocolate pieces, chocolate didnt melt completely, should i melt before adding cream or should i cook the mixture over double boiler? Should i chop chocolate incase i am buying large block?




If you buy the large block you have to chop it really fine to get it to melt just by pouring the boiling cream over - it takes ages and gets very messy as the choc starts melting all over you! I go out of my way to buy Lindt couverture as it comes in buttons rather than the Callebaut blocks I can buy locally as its such a pain to chop it up (you have to do it by hand, it's too hard to chuck in the food processor)

Having said that the taste of a good quality couverture is so much better than cheaper choc and if you are getting it for a decent price maybe it's worth the hassle!

nadia0411 Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 4:47am
post #4 of 14

Thanks Bunsen, anyone else, pleaaasssee???

Cookie4 Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 5:02am
post #5 of 14

Definitely chop it, even use your food processor and pulse until smaller particles.

Lita829 Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 5:08am
post #6 of 14

I agree with Bunsen, the quality may be worth the extra work. Also you might have to consider how much ganache you generally make. I don't want you to spend a considerable amount of money for something that you may not use up before it expires.

My personal preference is dark or white chocolate for ganaches...depending on what type of cake its going to cover. I am not a chocolatier but I think that the differences between dark, bittersweet, and semisweet are the amounts of sugar and cocoa solids in the chocolate. I may be wrong but its an educated guess icon_confused.gif I agree with you....I think that the dark would taste a little better under fondant to balance out sweetness of the fondant.

HTH

nadia0411 Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 12:06pm
post #7 of 14

wow thanks a lot both of u icon_smile.gif i got my answers,
Chop it definitely and dark chocolate is it
icon_biggrin.gif

pattycakesnj Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 12:16pm
post #8 of 14

I cook my cream and chocolate together instead of the pour method. No lumps and I don't have to chop my blocks of chocolate

LateBloomer Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 12:23pm
post #9 of 14

I usually use dark choc chips when making ganache. I have also used the large slabs. I wrap the slab in 2 plastic bags and throw it on the ground. It breaks into managable blocks.

SandiOh Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 12:32pm
post #10 of 14

I have recently started melting my chocolate over hot water then adding the heated cream...It works much better for me, and my ganache turns out much smoother and glossier.....SO, you wouldn't have to cut the chunks up as finely as the other method.

Personally, I like to mix chocolate for ganache. I add equal amounts of dark, semisweet and milk. I avoid chips, but use them when I have nothing else.

nadia0411 Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 1:05pm
post #11 of 14

one more quick question about ganache,
i read lot of threads which say 2:1 for dark and 3:1 for milk or white choc ganache. The cake is refrigerated so it sets up firmly before covering with fondant.
My question is if i want to fill it also with ganache, should i use different ratio or whip it? i dont want the filling to harden up as the covering?
any ideas?

pattycakesnj Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 7:40pm
post #12 of 14

I use 2 to 1 for everything but white. The filling never gets truly hard, nor does the outside when using 2 to 1, it just firms up. If you want a mushier filling, then use BC but I love ganache as a filling

nadia0411 Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 5:16am
post #13 of 14

i got a very useful tip from Rylan, so kind that Rylan answered by PM

when u place ganached covered and filled cake in fridge it does get very firm like a shell thqat provides a good base for the fondant. Once u r done with fondant, u can keep it outside and the filling can get to normal.

for perishble or soft fillings, no need to dam, just let it set and the ganache shell wont let it come out.

bchumley Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 6:24am
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by nadia0411

one more quick question about ganache,
i read lot of threads which say 2:1 for dark and 3:1 for milk or white choc ganache. The cake is refrigerated so it sets up firmly before covering with fondant.
My question is if i want to fill it also with ganache, should i use different ratio or whip it? i dont want the filling to harden up as the covering?
any ideas?




How serendipitous...I JUST finished a wedding cake filled, covered, and piped with ganache. If you're going 2:1 (choc:cream), whipping your well-chilled ganache will make a glorious filling (unless it's white...then I use 3:1). If your ratio is much more, or if it's going to be unusually cold, I'd err on the safe side and make up a batch with slightly more cream. My rule of thumb is that, after whipping, ganache filling should be no firmer than a filling-consistency buttercream. (Secret weapon if it does turn out too firm: corn syrup. Add in small amounts and whip liberally...take care not to let it get too soft, and taste after every addition to make sure you're not oversweetening or altering the flavor too much.)

Good luck with your cake!

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