Taking Pictures Of Your Cake

Decorating By Becky52 Updated 30 Jun 2010 , 12:56am by rkei

Becky52 Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 8:10pm
post #1 of 24

I always have trouble getting a good picture of my cakes - a picture that shows the coloring really well and any luster dust, etc. Have you discovered that certain lighting works better...no flash, etc? It always seems like my cakes look better in person and a picture is all I have after it is eatenicon_sad.gif I'm sure the quality of the camera makes a difference too, but I feel I have a pretty good camera...not the cheapest by any means. Any advice you can provide would be appreciated.

23 replies
sweetideas Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 8:19pm
post #2 of 24

I would be interested in this, as well. I would like to invest in a nice camera specifilcally for taking pictures of cupckakes, cookies and cakes.

sugarandslice Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 8:37pm
post #3 of 24

I struggle with this too. The things I've found that work a bit better are:

lots of natural light (suplemented with as much artificial light you can manage)
a dark background for most cakes (unless they're dark of course)
use the 'macro' setting if your camera has one
take lots of pics with and without flash and see which ones come out best
don't take pics of the cake front-on or top-only, find an angle in-between

As I said, I struggle with this and am in no way a professional photographer. I hope others here have some more advice for you.

HTH

drummer27 Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 8:40pm
post #4 of 24

First you need a plain uncluttered background...you don't want anything distracting attention from your cake. I saw on here before that someone uses one of those tri-fold presentation boards that you can get at a craft store. Try taking several pictures some with a flash and some without. If you are still having problems with the color you can do editing. I use photoshop but you can use one of the free sites online and go in and saturate the color and fix any exposure problems. Good luck!

Texas_Rose Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 8:48pm
post #5 of 24

Editing can make a big difference. I use Paint Shop Pro but there are free sites you can use too.

Here's some examples for you, I edited the right half of the pictures, so you could see the difference right on your cakes icon_biggrin.gif
Image
Image
Image

Spuddysmom Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 9:07pm
post #6 of 24

Texas Rose - wow those are excellent examples; thanks for posting. I bought a new camera when I couldn't fix all my blurred cake photos, unfortunately now realize that it wasn't the camera! I have a tremor and didn't know that was my problem. My new camera does have an anti-shake feature, and I will start using a tripod. A soon as I get a decent photo I will refer back to this thread to improve it.

ZoesMum Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 9:47pm
post #7 of 24

Just a quick comment on capturing luster...I found that this was one of the few times that I actually did end up using a flash picture rather than natural light...it captured the shimmer much better!

bobwonderbuns Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 9:53pm
post #8 of 24

Light it from the top if possible. That helps eliminate shadowing.

cownsj Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 10:15pm
post #9 of 24

I know this will sound odd, but..... my camera will take great pictures in the dark. So, I make the room as dark as possible, getting my best pictures at night, with all the lights off. My camera will capture the color best this way and I don't have to worry about shadows, plus the flash highlights any sparkle. I don't always get that chance, like when a cake is being assembled onsite for the first time, but anything that can be completed before delivery, I turn out the lights and take my pictures. Also, I do use those tri-fold stands and have fabric in different colors that I drape over it and onto the table top so I have a color background that best suits the cake colors. And, I take a ton of photos and download them right away to be sure I have the best shots, that the camera didn't shake, etc.

Kitagrl Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 10:28pm
post #10 of 24

They just had Paint Shop Pro Photox2 on Amazon for really cheap so I got it..haven't played with it yet.

I have problems taking photos too...and my brother is a freelance photographer! Unfortunately he lives in alaska and I'm in PA. icon_smile.gif

Lcubed82 Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 11:15pm
post #11 of 24

Gotta love Adobe Photoshop! and a photog hubby sometimes helps too- if I can pin him down! I am just trying to learn as much as I can on my own!

Becky52 Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 4:01pm
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Editing can make a big difference. I use Paint Shop Pro but there are free sites you can use too.

Here's some examples for you, I edited the right half of the pictures, so you could see the difference right on your cakes icon_biggrin.gif
Image
Image
Image




Wow, I can't believe the difference that made in my photos! Thanks - can you do that to all of them? icon_smile.gif I'll have to see if I can play around with some software...I think we may have Paint Shop Pro or one of those programs on our PC - my husband is a "Computer Nerd" - he has so many programs on our computer I can't keep them straighticon_smile.gif

YoCake Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 4:24pm
post #13 of 24

We invested in a really good 12 pixel digital camera, and I take literally 20 pictures of each wedding cake I set up, and I use all the different settings. I figure that I can get at least one decent picture. Then I take it to photoshop, crop it, lighten it, add a warming filter if necessary (especially if the picture looks stark), and adjust the saturation and color balance. It works pretty well. ALso, when I take pictures of the wedding cakes, sometimes I'll take it from the opposite side of the cake, where you can see how it fits into the "setting". It really works to photograph a cake along with the rest of the decorations in the hall.
For smaller cakes, I just either use a white or pink wall to photograph, and I make sure that I have tons of light. That makes such a difference.

Happy Snapping!

Renaejrk Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 4:56pm
post #14 of 24

I always have to edit mine to make them smaller! They are huge and show WAY more detail than I want!! lol (all the tiny flaws!) I want them smaller so you get the picture of how they looked! icon_smile.gif

_Jamie_ Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 6:58pm
post #15 of 24

And for pretty good (practically free-if you upgrade-still cheap!!), try www.picnik.com. I use it on all my pics. Bleand, highlight, boost the color, watermark, frame, all sorts of great things!

kaat Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 7:01pm
post #16 of 24

A good backdrop is key! Nothing detracts from a cake faster than piles of icing bags and bowls in the background. A good camera also helps. Lots of lighting. To help with the flash shadow I use a piece of tissue (single ply) over my flash to diffuse it.

_Jamie_ Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 7:02pm
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaat

A good backdrop is key! Nothing detracts from a cake faster than piles of icing bags and bowls in the background. A good camera also helps. Lots of lighting. To help with the flash shadow I use a piece of tissue (single ply) over my flash to diffuse it.




Oh gawd! I know someone who takes pics of their cakes next to bottles of dish soap and open boxes of crackers....and dirty paintbrushes, and posts them on their business website....what a way to detract from your product! thumbsdown.giftapedshut.gif

artscallion Posted 18 Jan 2010 , 8:03pm
post #18 of 24

I also use Paint Shop Pro Photo X2. I've been using this program for about ten years (I think the first one I got was Paint Shop Pro 7) I think it's the best hing out there. It does everything that Photoshop does, only it's 1/10th the price and it's way more user friendly.

Dizzymaiden Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 8:12pm
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Jamie_

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaat

A good backdrop is key! Nothing detracts from a cake faster than piles of icing bags and bowls in the background. A good camera also helps. Lots of lighting. To help with the flash shadow I use a piece of tissue (single ply) over my flash to diffuse it.



Oh gawd! I know someone who takes pics of their cakes next to bottles of dish soap and open boxes of crackers....and dirty paintbrushes, and posts them on their business website....what a way to detract from your product! thumbsdown.giftapedshut.gif




LOL - Yes please take a good look around before snapping that photo! I once saw a beautiful cake next to a dog bowl...lolol

michel30014 Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 8:36pm
post #20 of 24

A good backdrop with no clutter, lots of natural lighting mixed with inside lighting and take several pics of each of your cakes from front, back and different angles to ensure you get something that looks good. Once I transfer to my computer, I edit somewhat and decide which is the best couple of photos and keep those. All others are then deleted.

(Of course, I have a daughter studying photography in college, so when she is done completing that, she will be my artist and photographer!! I feel so lucky!

Good luck!!

thecakeprincess Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 8:43pm
post #21 of 24

Thanks for all the good info!

FlourPots Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 8:48pm
post #22 of 24
Dayti Posted 29 Jun 2010 , 8:49pm
post #23 of 24

I followed this blog post to make a DIY lightbox: http://www.strobist.blogspot.com/2006/07/how-to-diy-10-macro-photo-studio.html
You need to consider what size cardboard box to get to make sure your cakes fit in easily!
If you have a strong enough light (I use a spotlight designed for outdoors that you can pick up really cheap, I think its 500W) you will not need to use flash which can make your colours look funny. Depending on where you place the light, you can have more or less shadow.
I use a tripod and no flash and generally set the camera on macro. I was lucky to have a friend who showed me how to use the different settings on the camera, but for the life of me could not explain them properly to anyone else!
I use Lightroom on my Mac to adjust the photo - changing just 3 or so settings can really make your cake pop.

rkei Posted 30 Jun 2010 , 12:56am
post #24 of 24

Macro setting, and edit the pictures helps a TON too! Picnik is a great photo editor! And a DSLR camera makes a huge differnence too. although they are quite expensive!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%