Anesthesia Question

Lounge By costumeczar Updated 17 Jan 2010 , 2:10pm by Loucinda

costumeczar Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 6:32pm
post #1 of 21

My 11-yr-old has to have an MRI for scoliosis on Friday, and they're going to give her some kind of anesthesia to keep her from moving around. I don't have any idea what kind they usually give to kids, but if anyone has had their kids go through this, what's the usual "recovery" time that I can expect? They're scheduled a followup appointment to go over the results about 2 hours after the MRI is scheduled to start, and I just have a feeling that I'm going to be hauling a half-asleep kid around.

She's as tall as I am, and weighs about the same, so I'm thinking that they'll be giving her an "adult" dose of whatever it is. Sorry I can't be more specific.

As I'm looking at the hospital map, the parking deck, MRI location and the followup location are all fairly far apart. Would it be worth it to round up a wheelchair to take with me? She's never had any kind of anesthesia before so I have no idea what I'm in for...

20 replies
flourgirlz Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 7:18pm
post #2 of 21

I used to work in a pediatric ER, and I'm guessing they will be doing a conscious sedation. We did these quite frequently for kids needing stitches and ones with broken bones. They pretty much "fall asleep" and don't remember anything. I am assuming she won't be sedated for too long, so she should wake easily, but will probably be a little groggy for a while. It might not be a bad idea to have a wheelchair for her. I'm sure they will provide one since they don't really want patients walking too much after they have had this. Vomiting after is common, so an empty stomach might be best. Now, this is all assuming she is getting the conscious sedation. Hope this helps!

TexasSugar Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 7:21pm
post #3 of 21

I doubt they will let her leave unless she is completely awake. I had some dental work done when I was 17 or 18 and they had to knock me out for part of it. They had a recovery room that they kept you in for a while afterward. I will say, be prepared for her to be emotional. I woke up from my crying and kept crying. They told my mom that that was pretty normal for girls.

Have you tried calling the DR office and seeing if they can answer any of your questions or give you more information about what to expect?

costumeczar Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 8:21pm
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

I doubt they will let her leave unless she is completely awake. I had some dental work done when I was 17 or 18 and they had to knock me out for part of it. They had a recovery room that they kept you in for a while afterward. I will say, be prepared for her to be emotional. I woke up from my crying and kept crying. They told my mom that that was pretty normal for girls.

Have you tried calling the DR office and seeing if they can answer any of your questions or give you more information about what to expect?




Thanks for the responses...I called the doctor and they were very vague, so I figured I'd check out some real-world experience here! Thanks for the warning on the crying, good lord...

flourgirlz, thanks for the info too. They did tell me about the empty stomach. I can get a wheelchair from her grandparents so that I can roll her on out to the parking lot if need be and not have to worry about trying to navigate back to return it at the hospital. I just don't want to take a chance on having to lug her around or convince her to walk "just a little longer" if she suddenly gets hit with a wave of tiredness!

JanH Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 8:34pm
post #5 of 21

Most hospitals have a number of wheelchairs available at the main and emergency room entrances.

For an outpatient MRI, they might not send a transporter with a wheelchair to get your daughter, but patients who've had procedures with anesthesia are always provided a wheelchair and usually a transporter (to take them to the exit where their ride is waiting to pick them up).

Since you're not going to be leaving the hospital, just ask the transporter to wheel your daughter to where the follow-up is or you can wheel her yourself.

She may or may not be groggy... I had outpatient nasal surgery, and was sent home so groggy I don't remember leaving the hospital, or the hour long car ride home..

But do call the hospital, just to confirm what I'v said so you're not worring about scrounging up a wheelchair.. (They're a real pain to fold up and take in/out of the trunk.)

HTH

P.S. And if anyone gives you a hard time, up to and including any of the doctors - just ask to speak to the Administrator on Call, or you could start with the Patient Advocate...

saffronica Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 8:58pm
post #6 of 21

Really, JanH, is there anything you DON'T know?!

My four-year-old daughter was under conscious sedation last summer when she had to have stitches on her face. Honestly, it was a beautiful thing. She was awake but perfectly calm while they stitched her wound. She was groggy for a little while afterward, but not too long -- and it was really funny. We didn't have any crying, but that could be because she's younger -- with an eleven-year-old girl there's probably a risk of an episode even without the anesthetic!

Deb_ Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 9:31pm
post #7 of 21

My son had to have an MRI when he was about 9 because of migraines. They gave him a pill about 15 minutes before the beginning of the test and it relaxed him.

He was never unconscious and by the time the MRI was over he was awake and ready to leave.....he got very "happy" which was funny.

She may feel groggy afterwards and want to lie down when you get her home.

Good luck to her!

Ruth0209 Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 11:19pm
post #8 of 21

I doubt it'll actually be a very strong anesthesia that they give her. My daughter used to have EEGs and they gave her chloral hydrate. It's a pretty mild sedative. They could also give her Versed. Either will make her groggy and Jan's suggestion to arrange for the wheelchair is a good one. And she's right - if anyone resists just be insistent. They don't want her to crack her skull on the floor, either.

Versed is crazy stuff. People are often awake and talking and seem totally normal, but the next day they don't remember a single thing. It can be hilarious. It's like truth serum. This is your big chance to interrogate your daughter!!

Good luck!

JanH Posted 11 Jan 2010 , 11:34pm
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by saffronica

Really, JanH, is there anything you DON'T know?!




For sure, you could fill up volumes with stuff I don't know. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

But I worked in a large hospital (Ingalls Memorial in Harvey, IL) for over two decades. And my twin sister has seen her share of Emergency Rooms (either I took her or had to pick her up) or hospital stays (she had such a poor excuse for a doctor, I had to protect her from "the system".

If at all possible, you never, ever want to go to the hospital or the ER alone!
(Trust me on this.)

Ruth0209 Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 12:04am
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Quote:
Originally Posted by saffronica

Really, JanH, is there anything you DON'T know?!



If at all possible, you never, ever want to go to the hospital or the ER alone!(Trust me on this.)




This is SO true. My DH is a "frequent flyer" in the ER, and it's been really beneficial for him to have a clear-headed person with him to make sure they're getting all the information they need and to be an advocate for him. It's also true when you're in-patient. Patients who do not have family members there just do not get as good of care as those with people who can make sure they get what they need.

And I'm not bashing on the nursing staff, either. Hospitals have their staff levels stripped down to next to nothing. Those poor nurses are running as fast as they can. When I had a surgery a few years ago, my nurse told me that on the post-surgery unit that she had 13 patients. Yikes.

mbelgard Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 12:23am
post #11 of 21

I wouldn't worry about a wheelchair, they aren't going to toss you out the minute she wakes up.

My youngest had tubes in his ears a little over a year ago and we had a recovery room to sit in until he was awake enough to go. He got over it really quickly, not quite normal but nice for me, and was running around in McDonalds an hour after he woke up.

If your daughter is having trouble you can always request a wheelchair, they'll almost certainly send someone with you to your car to take it back so you aren't leaving a child in a vehicle.

CakeMommyTX Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 2:10am
post #12 of 21

My son has had to have several oral surgeries each time he was sedated and they provided the wheel chair .
They actually required him to sit in it the same way they require you when you leave after having a baby, it was'nt an option to have him walk by himself or to even carry him, I'm sure it was a liability thing.

Same here TexasSugar the 2 times I've been under general anaesthesia I woke up crying and very emotional.

KitchenKat Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 8:47am
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

My son had to have an MRI when he was about 9 because of migraines. They gave him a pill about 15 minutes before the beginning of the test and it relaxed him.

He was never unconscious and by the time the MRI was over he was awake and ready to leave.....he got very "happy" which was funny.




My son too! He was 20 months old, had cut his tongue and was sedated for the stitches. After about half an hour, the sedative wore off. It was hilarious watching him singing, giggling and talking non-stop. He sure made the pediatric er ward cheery. Even the nurses couldn't stop smiling.

just_for_fun Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 1:49pm
post #14 of 21

My dd has had several MRI's under anesthesia. The type they use depends on how long it will take (hers were from 20 minutes to an hour.) Each experience is different. She could wake up all cranky and crying, or laughing hysterically. One time we left about 20-30 minutes later, another time we thought we could leave after 1 1/2 hours, then she vomited all over the place so we had to stay longer.

Remember to bring something quiet for her to do while in recovery (a small dvd with headphones is best).

Also a book for yourself while you're waiting, and eat and drink something. I saw parents fainting twice, both times they were so nervous that they didn't eat or drink all day. Of course, do it when she's out, cause she won't be able to eat from that morning until they decide that the anesthesia is out of her system so you won't want to eat in front of her.

In all 3 hospitals that I've been to, the nursing staff was very helpful. If they don't help you transport her as needed, just ask.

Loucinda Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 2:38pm
post #15 of 21

CC - I can't help much, I do know that I had an infant that was a very tiny preemie, and because he was so active, they would sedate him because he used up all of the calories he was getting. (it was one of the "conscious" ones - never knocked him out)

I know it is a worry anytime your child is having a proceedure done, so I am sending you hugs for that.

One other thing, if you have a bad feeling or question ANYTHING that is being done, tell them to STOP and get your questions answered.

-Tubbs Posted 12 Jan 2010 , 3:40pm
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX


Same here TexasSugar the 2 times I've been under general anaesthesia I woke up crying and very emotional.



Me too. Also it makes me temporarily deaf. A bit scary the first time it happened!

I would be very surprised if they used a general for a procedure like this though. A sedative is much more likely. I had a colonoscopy under sedative last year and the turnaround for that was very quick. I was in at 9am and home by 11am.

I really hope things go well for your daughter...

mrspriss0912 Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 4:18am
post #17 of 21

We give versed at the Asc I work for and my CRNA'S have used a pediatric form that they give p.o. it works quick and dosent hang around in the system for very long afterwards. She may be groggy and may not remember anything the next day that is the good side effect. I suggest you just come right out and ask them what the sedation is going to be. you have to be the pt adivocate for your daughter. Also you should at some point prior to the procedure be given the oppertunity to talk with the CRNA or the nurse " concious sedation" You have the right to ask all the questions you want and have them tell you the drugs they are using , dosage and short/long term effects.

costumeczar Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 11:31pm
post #18 of 21

Thanks for all the advice...Everything went well, and she's okay other than having to get a brace for the scoliosis. Nothing surgical needs to be done, which is good.

They gave her a general anesthesia, which put her out for the whole thing, and took about an hour to get out of her system enough that she could be taken over to the doctor for the MRI review. Her biggest complaint is that her mouth tastes like plastic from the tube they put in her mouth, so if that's the worst of it that's fine!

Deb_ Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 11:59pm
post #19 of 21

That's great, I'm glad she did so well.

Enjoy your weekend!

just_for_fun Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 5:57am
post #20 of 21

Glad it went well, and that the results show that no surgery is needed!

Loucinda Posted 17 Jan 2010 , 2:10pm
post #21 of 21

Thanks for letting us know how it went. I am glad to hear it all went well. It is always so hard when it is your child having to go through something.

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