Can I Build A 3 Tier Square Cake From Sheet Cakes?

Decorating By egensinnig Updated 7 Feb 2010 , 11:22am by egensinnig

egensinnig Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 11:39am
post #1 of 18

I'm doing a wedding cake for a friend and she wants a 3 tiers square cake.
Unforunately I can´t get hold of square pans unless ordering from another country and it would be too expensive.

I'm planning to bake normal sheet cakes and cut them into the sizes I need - any downsides on doing it this way? Anything I should keep in mind?

The cake will be covered with fondant. And the sizes:
32 cm= 12,8 inches
24 cm= 9,6 inches
16 cm= 6,4 inches


Any suggestions or advise would be greatly appreciated!

17 replies
egensinnig Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 1:20pm
post #2 of 18

Anyone?

leah_s Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 1:20pm
post #3 of 18

It's not the best idea, but I understand your problem. After you cut the cakes, you'll need to freeze them. Oherwise you'll make yourself crazy trying to frost the "raw" edges.

egensinnig Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 1:28pm
post #4 of 18

Ok, you confirmed my concerns about doing it this way....
Thanks for the freezing idea, didn't think about that. And maybe i should crumb coat and let that set and then add a second layer of frosting that I smooth and then put on the fondant?

pinkflower1212 Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 1:33pm
post #5 of 18

yes you can do it this way. Elisa Strauss shows in her book for kids to make all the cakes from sheet cakes and trim away what you don't need.

I would make sure that my cake is well chilled before I cut it for the least amount of crumbs though. Also, as stated by leah_s I'd make sure it was still well chilled when you go to crumb coat and than chill again.

Hope it turns out great!

love2makecakes Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 1:55pm
post #6 of 18

Do not fear it will work just fine. I have done it many many times. Infact I recently made a 4 tier heart shape cake using squares because I didnt want to bother buying heartshaped pans. When making carved cakes you have to ice raw edges too.

Like the other two said you will need to chill it before (if you use a really crumbly cake), my cakes are very sturdy so I personally do not chill them before icing them. One thing I found easier is to pipe on the icing before you try to smooth it instead of just putting the icing on with a spatula.

Hope this helps! icon_smile.gif

kel58 Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 1:59pm
post #7 of 18

I agree with crlovescakes about piping the icing on your raw edges. I find it MUCH easier to do it this way. Fewer crumbs in your icing and less stress.

egensinnig Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:11pm
post #8 of 18

Thanks a lot for all good advice - much appreciated!! Piping on the icing sounds like a great idea. Sorry if it's dumb question but what tip would be good? A large petal tip or just a plain roud tip?

love2makecakes Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:21pm
post #9 of 18

I just use a plain round or just the coupler itself depending on how large the area I am trying to cover.

kel58 Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:24pm
post #10 of 18

I like Wiltons No. 789 Cake Icer Basketweave Decorating Tip. A larger basket weave tip would work too but would just take more time depending on the area you are covering.

egensinnig Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 5:55pm
post #11 of 18

I found a cake frame ( Don't know what to call it...) that was rectangular and adjustable! And to a good price as well
I can make the large size and then I will have to cut the 2 smaller tiers to get the right size. But this way I get a good heigth - it's 3 inches high!

So now I've made a test run and it was ok. Had to even and level it a bit but I think it will work! Unfortunately I had a not so good recipe so I'll rebake tomorrow with another recipe. The test cake is now filled with raspberry mousse and whipped white choclate ganache and I'll crumbcoat it tomorrow using your tip about piping on the icing. Will post a pic of the frame and the cake tomorrow!

mckaren Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 7:05pm
post #12 of 18

I agree with chiling the cakes before you carve or bc them. I pipe the bc on before I smooth it, I just snip a slit in the corner of a sandwich bag (jt's a bit like a large petal tube) and then throw it away when I'm done.

egensinnig Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 7:14pm
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mckaren

I agree with chiling the cakes before you carve or bc them. I pipe the bc on before I smooth it, I just snip a slit in the corner of a sandwich bag (jt's a bit like a large petal tube) and then throw it away when I'm done.




That's a great tip - dumb question from Swede - what is a sandwich bag?
I only have small petal tip so if I can do it your way I would save a lot of time and trouble icon_smile.gif

love2makecakes Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 7:34pm
post #14 of 18

a sandwich bag is a ziplock bag here in the states or a food storage bag.

mckaren Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 7:36pm
post #15 of 18

it's a clear plastic food bag that you use for keeping food fresh in the fridge or your sandwiches fresh. They can have tie handles, zip locks etc

I don't have a large flat tip either, I tried this last week and it worked perfectly.

egensinnig Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 7:40pm
post #16 of 18

Ahhh - thanks then I'm with you icon_smile.gif
Will definately try this tomorrow!

egensinnig Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 7:28pm
post #17 of 18

Here is my first test run with the cake frame. It's literally just a frame and no bottom. It worked ok. I piped on teh crumb coating as recommended and that worked like a charm. Covered with fondant/marsipan mix.
Now I feel a bit more confident to do the 3 tiers.....

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1558469

egensinnig Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 11:22am
post #18 of 18

And here is the finished wedding cake:
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1576609

I did it! I'm so happy it turned out ok icon_smile.gif

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