How To Make A Moist Cake_

Decorating By karukaru Updated 10 Jan 2010 , 2:51pm by karukaru

karukaru Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:23am
post #1 of 10

Hi Everyone! I started baking and decorating for fun and now people want to buy cakes from me. I am a newbie so I have many questions regarding baking and decorating and it would be great if you could answer some of them:

1. How do you make a moist cake withouth using pudding? do you add a syropy liquid to the cake after baking it or use oil in the baking?

2. what is tylose for? is it the same as Wilton´s gumtex?

That is it for now. I have many more questions but I will only ask a couple at a time. Thanks for your help! icon_biggrin.gif

9 replies
Deb_ Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:28am
post #2 of 10

Hi and welcome.

I think the main reason why some people's cakes come out dry is over baking. Of course the recipe/method used is important, but proper baking time is even more important.

I use my nose to gauge baking time. When I can smell cake, I know it's close to being finished. The more you bake the easier this will be.

Some people use a simple syrup to moisten up their cake, but I don't particularly care for the result that produces.

Tylose.....one use is, when mixed with fondant it will help your figures dry quicker and harder. It is also used in my gumpaste recipe.

dsilbern Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:34am
post #3 of 10

I add sour cream to keep cakes moist. Works great!

karukaru Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:35am
post #4 of 10

Thank you!
So tylose is like gumtex then? i took the wilton classes and they said that gumtex will make the fondant dry harder and quicker.

My cakes arent usually dry but i like them really moist. Also, I always leave them out on the counter and I think the A/C dries them out as the days go buy. I would love to find out how the bakeries do it because they do their cakes way in advance and they do not get dry. I have seen on TV that they keep their cakes in the refrigerator but I have also heard that the fridge dries them out. Thanks in advance for your help.

madgeowens Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:36am
post #5 of 10

I agree with not over baking and I also use sour cream if I want it extra moist and special and maybe a denser cake I use the wasc recipe...hth

KawaiiCakeCook Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:38am
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Hi and welcome.

I think the main reason why some people's cakes come out dry is over baking. Of course the recipe/method used is important, but proper baking time is even more important.

I use my nose to gauge baking time. When I can smell cake, I know it's close to being finished. The more you bake the easier this will be.

Some people use a simple syrup to moisten up their cake, but I don't particularly care for the result that produces.

Tylose.....one use is, when mixed with fondant it will help your figures dry quicker and harder. It is also used in my gumpaste recipe.





hahahah, me too. I was at a girlfriends house and we made cookies I looked up took a sniff, said "cookies are done" and no later then 5 seconds later timer goes off, we all got a good laugh out of it.

Deb_ Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:40am
post #7 of 10

The nose "knows" icon_lol.gif

dsilbern Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 3:00am
post #8 of 10

If you want to bake ahead and are concerned about drying, you could freeze the cakes. I never used to because I thought theyd be dry like the fridge does. But after reading the threads here I started freezing and I swear the cakes are more moist than if I baked and served the same day.

madgeowens Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 3:01am
post #9 of 10

Now that I think about it, whereever I am in the house, when I smell cake, I run to the kitchen! Must be true.....the nose knows

karukaru Posted 10 Jan 2010 , 2:51pm
post #10 of 10

Thank you everyone!

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