Contracts And Deposits

Decorating By sweet12 Updated 9 Jan 2010 , 6:58pm by indydebi

sweet12 Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 4:59pm
post #1 of 10

I am thinking when an individual comes to me with their order and we sit down and sign the contracts and list all the details they are asking/wanting, etc, would it be too demanding to ask they make their deposit for my services then and there at the contract signing? That way Im not in linbo wondering if and when they are still considering me or have went elsewhere even tho they have signed a contract with me?? I will also have a clause put in that if they do choose to break their contract then the deposit is non-refundable--would this be too demanding for a client?

9 replies
cupandcake81 Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:05pm
post #2 of 10

I would ask for a deposit its your time your spending on her cake and you want to make sure shes not going to back out on you. Yes I would also put in about the no refund.

sweet12 Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:10pm
post #3 of 10

thanks, i know a lot of ppl who do not and then have others come and want that certain date that was promised to someone else, and they have lost orders that way. And it becomes costly when items are bought and the customer backs out last minute without any word whatsoever. I see you are from NY near Letchworth--i grew up near Attica.

Deb_ Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:13pm
post #4 of 10

Here's what I do, because sometimes the client is still "shopping around" when they come for a tasting.

I tell them that until the deposit is received and the contract is signed then their date is still open on my calender. I understand that they may want to shop around a bit more but I make sure they know this.

I don't fill out a contract until they're ready to pay the deposit, which for me is 50% due at time of signing.

All deposits are non-refundable.

HTH

natlteam10 Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:16pm
post #5 of 10

The way I put it is that I require a deposit with the contract signing. My contract states that the deposit must be paid at signing. I tell clients that without the deposit, the contract is not valid. This is the way I state it: "If you only sign the contract and don't pay the deposit, I cannot hold the date. If someone else walks in the door with the deposit and a contract, then they will have priority over you. However if you sign and pay now, you have priority even if someone else offers to pay more."

That is the ideal situation. However, I will not turn down a contract. A signed contract makes the clients feel bound to you (psychologically). Although the contract is not valid without the deposit, it is unlikely that they will choose someone else after they sign a contract. BUT I make sure I tell the clients that the contract takes effect upon receipt of the deposit, NOT at the signing.

Hope this helps.

justsweet Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:17pm
post #6 of 10

If you go to the "Forums" and look under "cake decorating business" you will find a lot of information.

A lot of the people here ask for a deposit and most or all is non-refundable depending on when they cancel the order. You will have to make that decision.

Also, some ask for the remaining payment a week or two before the date.

_Jamie_ Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:23pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Here's what I do, because sometimes the client is still "shopping around" when they come for a tasting.

I tell them that until the deposit is received and the contract is signed then their date is still open on my calender. I understand that they may want to shop around a bit more but I make sure they know this.

I don't fill out a contract until they're ready to pay the deposit, which for me is 50% due at time of signing.

All deposits are non-refundable.

HTH


Exactly this to the "t". I wouldn't deviate from this procedure one bit.

sweet12 Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:25pm
post #8 of 10

Thanks everyone. I feel that it is in my best interest to use both contracts and deposits--and 50% sounds like a reasonable amount as well as paid in full two weeks prior to the event to guarantee my services. Thanks for your replies to help me make my decision concrete icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 5:46pm
post #9 of 10

I give them a contract to take home with them at the tasting appointment. I tell them that if they decide to hire me to send it back, signed, with the deposit, and I'll sign it and send them a copy with both signatures. I don't have them booked until I have a deposit and a signed contract. And I don't sign anything until they sign it first! icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 6:58pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I give them a contract to take home with them at the tasting appointment. I tell them that if they decide to hire me to send it back, signed, with the deposit, and I'll sign it and send them a copy with both signatures. I don't have them booked until I have a deposit and a signed contract. And I don't sign anything until they sign it first! icon_smile.gif


This is what I always did, too. IN ADDITION, a contract was included in the Gen'l Info Packet that I emailed to them in the beginning, so many times, they arrive at the tasting with a siged contract in their hands, ready to give it to me. That only happened about 3 times, but it was nice.

Note that my contract is a "contract" and not an order form, so it's easy for me to send one prior to even meeting with them. The details of the order are on separate forms.

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