metria Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 6:16am
post #1 of

I plan on hand-painting some black designs on to white fondant, but then I want the whole thing to look shiny, like it was ceramic. How can I achieve this look? Can I paint it then steam the whole thing or will that make the colors run? Can I spray it with PAM and brush it lightly without messing up the designs? An airbrush isn't in my budget just yet and a can of edible lacquer spray seems really expensive.

TIA!

12 replies
Melnick Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 10:04am
post #2 of

Just looking up my Planet Cake book. It says for glazing icing you can either use jam diluted with boiling water (strain to remove any lumps) or olive oil cooking spray. Apply glaze with a paintbrush as close as possible to the time you are serving the cake. There's also a glear gel for glazing tortes and fruits that you can use which is a professional product from cake shops.

(They paint that on their black fondant to make it all shiny)

juststarted Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 6:47pm
post #3 of

spraying pam on fondant should five you the effect you're looking for.

LoriMc Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 9:04pm
post #4 of

There was a thread on here a couple months ago that discussed mixing karo and a clear liquor to a 50/50 ratio. You might search for that.

Whatever you try, I would test it out on a small piece of black fondant first.

mrsmudrash Posted 9 Jan 2010 , 10:34pm
post #5 of

I've done the 50/50 ratio of corn syrup to vodka and it worked beautifully!! It stays tacky though for a long time, so that's the only draw back - NO TOUCHING! icon_smile.gif

metria Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 5:49pm
post #6 of

followup FYI:

I had painted a design on to white fondant with black food coloring mixed with gin. After it dried for 24 hours, I tried 3 methods for making the fondant shiny: confectioner's glaze, spray canola oil, and shortening.

The confectioner's glaze (CK brand) gave it a satin sheen. Unfortunately the glaze is almond/beige colored. I lost the bright white of the fondant.

The canola oil made it very shiny, but also of course oily looking. I blotted some up with paper towels and that improved, but still wasn't the look I was going for.

I rubbed a thin film of shortening on another part. That worked well, not too shiny and not too greasy looking.

None of these methods messed up the black design at all. It didn't run or fade.

Unfortunately none of these also gave me the ceramic glaze look I wanted. I will continue testing other methods. Thanks for all your input!

careylynn Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 9:21pm
post #7 of

I used my finger and rubbed some shortening on it. It gives it a shiny matte look. I'm sure for more detailed objects you could use a Qtip with shortening on it to get into the creases. HTH

careylynn Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 9:21pm
post #8 of

I used my finger and rubbed some shortening on it. It gives it a shiny matte look. I'm sure for more detailed objects you could use a Qtip with shortening on it to get into the creases. HTH

Melnick Posted 15 Jan 2010 , 10:47pm
post #9 of

Maybe try that Planet Cake method - I think that's the shine that you are after (at least that is how the pic looks)

FlourPots Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 6:48am

Well, I can tell you what NOT to use, based on the totebag handles I just posted.

Wilton glycerin. It worked beautifully for awhile, then it ruined my beads!

artscallion Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 1:31pm

Use this recipe for edible varnish. I used it on some gumpaste shoes and belt on a Santa cake. They ended up looking like the shiniest patent leather you ever saw. And the finish dries completely.

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/7292/edible-varnish


My only advice is that since this has gelatin it has to stay really warm when you use it in order for it to be smooth. If it starts to cool while you're working, it will begin to clump and mess up. I get around this by warming it over hot water in a little metal pot (a butter warmer) Then I keep it in the pot while I'm painting it on. The metal keeps it warm for a long time.

FlourPots Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 5:18pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by artscallion

Use this recipe for edible varnish. I used it on some gumpaste shoes and belt on a Santa cake. They ended up looking like the shiniest patent leather you ever saw. And the finish dries completely.





So good to know...thanks!

metria Posted 16 Jan 2010 , 5:24pm

sounds great, tyvm! i'll let yall know how it turns out

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