Disco Dust

Decorating By krm52200 Updated 23 Feb 2010 , 8:19pm by Tee-Y

krm52200 Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 6:53pm
post #1 of 12

I'm sure this is a very silly question but - how does one apply disco dust? Do you just brush it on dry like lustre or pearl? Or do you need to add liquid?

Thanks in advance for answering my silly question of the day icon_smile.gif

11 replies
tastyart Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 11:25pm
post #2 of 12

You can do either. I've painted it on mixed with vodka.

krm52200 Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 11:42pm
post #3 of 12

Thanks for the reply. Does it retain its super sparkly appearance when you mix it with the vodka?

_Jamie_ Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 11:43pm
post #4 of 12

Wet the area you want it to stick to if it is dry. Dab it on with a poofy dry brush.

PinkLisa Posted 7 Jan 2010 , 12:03am
post #5 of 12

You can also apply piping gel to the area and then pour the disco dust on it.

tastyart Posted 7 Jan 2010 , 2:19am
post #6 of 12

It will still be sparkly after mixing with vodka.

bonniebakes Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 10:49pm
post #7 of 12

what's the difference in how it looks when added on (like glitter) or mixed with vodka first, then painted on?

I'm guessing that the sparkly is more subtle when it's mixed with vodka and looks more like glitter when added without vodka - is that right?

thanks!!

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 11:30pm
post #8 of 12

Disco dust is very fine plastic glitter. It's texture/shine, etc. is unchanged when you mix it with anything clear--water or vodka.

It's relatively hard to control in liquid because it doesn't really "mix". It floats and often clumps.

For a nice even application, the easiest method is to paint the object with a thin coat of piping gel and to sprinkle the disco dust over it, with it over a piece of parchment paper or plastic lid. If you cut a notch out of the plastic lid, you can use it as a way to funnel the excess dust back into the container.

HTH
Rae

bonniebakes Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 12:29am
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

D

For a nice even application, the easiest method is to paint the object with a thin coat of piping gel and to sprinkle the disco dust over it, with it over a piece of parchment paper or plastic lid. If you cut a notch out of the plastic lid, you can use it as a way to funnel the excess dust back into the container.

HTH
Rae




So I should apply it like I used to do craft projects with kids... thanks for the help!!

BlakesCakes Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 2:39am
post #10 of 12

That's how I do it--and how I was taught to do it in a class I took on making gelatin flowers & bows.

HTH
Rae

bonniebakes Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 1:10pm
post #11 of 12

thanks, Rae!

Tee-Y Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 8:19pm
post #12 of 12

It depends on what you want to apply the dust to. For a fondant cake I sprinkle onto the fondant while rolling out just before I get to the thickness I want then I roll further securing the glitter to the fondant then I lift and cover the cake. For gelatine or gumpaste flowers I brush a thin coat of gumglue or sometimes eggwhite on the edges and touch the edges to the disco dust already laid out in a flat plate. I use gumglue most often for my sugar pieces and in some instances like stenciling I use royal icing so I think it just depends on what you want to attach the disco dust to.HTH.

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