No One Will Eat Fondant-Not Even Mff So ? About White

Decorating By JustToEatCake Updated 4 Jan 2010 , 10:07pm by colombean

JustToEatCake Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 6:41am
post #1 of 47

Anyone made/tasted fondant made with white chocolate because I tried again and no one (again not even myself) will eat fondant and we are so not a picky eating group of people, even the guys at my SO work (mechanics and parts guys) wouldn't eat the fondant.

It's just too sweet and chewy. Looks nice, tastes icky on a cake. I asked everyone to at least try a bite with their cake and it was a no go. They all said (and I tend to agree) that cake is supposed to have a creamy soft frosting, but the look is soooo nice. I think fondant is dry feeling in the mouth and doesn't compliment the cake.

Anyway I am wondering why I am knocking myself out making MMF when I might as well just use MFF, or I need to get lots better with buttercream (starting my first class) but I love the look of fondant so I am wondering about the white chocolate fondant (mix of melted white chocolate and regular fondant) BTW I am a hobby baker just for friends and family and whoever else I can give it to.

46 replies
kimblyd Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 7:55am
post #2 of 47

I have always wanted to learn how to decorate with fondant. I think it makes such a beautifully finished cake. But I haven't really tried because most of the people I make cakes for (I am a hobbyist, too) say they don't like fondant either.

I use candy clay for accent pieces and figures because it is cheaper and easier to make than fondant. Kids love it but most adults push it aside. I don't think it is because of the taste so much as it the texture.

I just bought the Ace of Cakes book and in it Duff says that fondant should be peeled off and not eaten. I once recommended this to my niece when I was trying to talk her into a fondant covered cake. She told me that some of the icing would come off on the fondant and that would not be acceptable!

I figure why go to the extra expense and effort if it is not appreciated. However, if you really want to use fondant and your cakes are gifts, I say use it and tell 'em Duff said to peel it off!

KateLS Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 9:09am
post #3 of 47

My husband thought fondant was nasty until I made MFF. Then he LOVED my cakes! We didn't like mmf as much. But it's preference. My sister in law doesn't like it, but most of the rest of my extended family like it. It also depends on the flavor/sweetness of the frosting and how thin you roll your fondant. It also depends on how big a piece of cake you have. Even if I have too big of a piece, I leave some of the fondant on my plate, and I LOVE the stuff! =) But hey, that means I should eat smaller pieces. =) But yes, it's preference. I suggest rolling it thinner and not say anything about it to those you feed it to. They'll first eat it out of respect to you for making it, and a lot more will probably like it. =)

If using fondant, I still say MFF all the way! =)

I haven't tried the white chocolate with MFF, but I made the regular chocolate, and it was yummy. I assume the white chocolate would be yummy. But I think for most, it's the texture. It's like if you're expecting soda to drink out of your cup, but you accidentally grab the water cup, the water tastes gross, because it's not what is expected. I think a lot more people would like it if their expectations changed on the textured expected.

I hope you do find something that works for you! =)
Good luck! =)

anamado Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 11:00am
post #4 of 47

Well, I'm a family/friends birthday cakes maker too icon_biggrin.gif

I always use MMF and almost everybody eats it. I make a very thin MMF covering layer, and if underneath you use ganache, I assure you none will complain.

For instance, in my last cake,
http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1548090
I used ganache covered with MMF (thin) and I haven't seen a single mmf leftover in the plates. The fondant gets too glued to the chocolate, and the chocolate to the cake icon_biggrin.gif (I heard no complains either icon_biggrin.gif )

Bel_Anne Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 11:54am
post #5 of 47

I would make cake after cake and the fondant would always be left on everyone's plate. UNTIL I used chocolate ganache underneath. I'm not sure what you put under your fondant... but ganache just does wonders for it. Now there's never a crumb left (and I'm not exaggerating!) It also makes for such a smooth surface that you can make your fondant very thin. There's loads of info on here about if you do a search... icon_smile.gif

Bel_Anne Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 11:57am
post #6 of 47

Oh hold on, I just checked your pics (should have done that first)... you already use ganache, haha. Well I have no idea then! icon_smile.gif Maybe make your ganache thicker and fondant thinner? Good luck with the buttercream if all else fails...

Kims_cakes Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 12:35pm
post #7 of 47

Hmm, I never really liked any type of fondant, I still don't. I personally don't like marshmallows either. But to my surprise most people eat ALL of the MMF I make. The last two cakes I made were with BC underneath. Maybe it is a texture thing. And I think that most people think that it tastes bad and can't get that thought out of their head, even when it tastes yummy.

zdebssweetsj Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 1:35pm
post #8 of 47

Have you checked out Sugarshacks DVD on butter cream. You can have butter cream so smooth it will look as beautiful as fondant I love doing fondant over ganache (thats another Sugarshack DVD) , I think it improves the flavor of the fondant. There rally is a taste and texture difference in the brands, so experiment till you find one that you like

_Jamie_ Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 1:35pm
post #9 of 47

Most people do not want to chew their icing. So even if your fondant has a blue ribbon award for it's taste....more likely than not, it's going to be on the plate. I make the MFF and I know dang good and well it's the best, but it's on most people's plates. Whatever. And I rolll it super thin too.

Loucinda Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 2:46pm
post #10 of 47

The poinsettia cake I made in December (for 300) had fondant on it, and I was absolutely amazed that 95% of the fondant was eaten. (it was MMF) I had several folks comment that they didn't realize how good fondant was. (I attended the wedding that this cake was served at)

m1m Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:05pm
post #11 of 47

I make mmf with chocolate also, but some people just don't like the texture.

I think I will try to roll it thinner next time.

milkmaid42 Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:25pm
post #12 of 47

I agree with the above posts. It really does boil down to the texture issue. I have made so many different flavors of MMF, MFF and "regular" fondant and it seems like it is seldom eaten. Family is always willing to try one more variation and they all agree it would be good as a candy where one would expect to have to chew. The most successful is chocolate fondant over chocolate ganache, and I attribute that to the fact it is almost impossible to peel apart!
It makes a perfect canvas to work on, however, so I do continue to use it. It seems most of my clients like the look, so I just figure good fillings make up for the loss of the coating.

JenniferMI Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:30pm
post #13 of 47

I agree on the texture issue BUT if you put a very thin layer on, which you can with my white choc. fondant, they will eat it.

Thin is the key in my book.

Jen icon_smile.gif

_Jamie_ Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:49pm
post #14 of 47

This is 1/16th of an inch thin. I can't imagine getting much thinner than this. icon_biggrin.gif Had this teeeeeny little piece of bday cake left from my friend's party the other night, had to take a pic!
LL

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:56pm
post #15 of 47

I've used Satin Ice on a few cakes and I find it melts in my mouth and isn't that chewy at all.

indydebi Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:59pm
post #16 of 47

My son said he likes the taste, but he doesnt' like the texture. I agree that thin is key. I also think cakes covered in a thin layer tend to look better. One of the main reasons I stayed away from fondant for so long is I saw so many pics of thick fondant'd cakes and I thought they looked like play doh cakes. And I didn't want to put my name on a cake that was going to look like that.

Once I realized how much better they look in thin fondant, then I was a convert! thumbs_up.gif

_Jamie_ Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 4:03pm
post #17 of 47

Yeah, thick fondant is gross no matter what it is. You know, I notice older folks are really the ones who pick around it. Or my dad. I think pretty much everyone else just eats it. When it's as thin as I roll it, it's not even noticeably there really.

Danielle1218 Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 4:28pm
post #18 of 47

I have a couple questions...

I know what MMF is....I make it all the time.

What is MFF?

Also....questions about ganache? Are you frosting a cake with buttercream, then covering with a layer of ganache and THEN putting on a layer of fondant? I have never tried that, but I am open to new things.

Also, are you people pouring ganache on the cake or spreading it on? Whenever I have made ganache for cookies or truffles it is very thin (like right after making it). Are you letting it harden just a bit? I would think pouring warm ganache on a cake would be really messy.

indydebi Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 4:29pm
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielle1218

I would think pouring warm ganache on a cake would be really messy.


This is the only way I use ganache.

milkmaid42 Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 4:31pm
post #20 of 47

Jamie...I feel so dumb! icon_redface.gif I only just now realized what you are saying by "hippo gnu deer"! (Of course the fact that it is Jan 1st helped.) A very hippo gnu deer to all of you, too!
And yes, I do know that really thin fondant is the way to go, people just seem to be sensitized to the word, if nothing else.

_Jamie_ Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 4:41pm
post #21 of 47

Lol milkmaid...yep! It's part of "Wee Fish Ewe A Mare Egrets Moose Panda Hippo Gnu Deer"

JustToEatCake Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 4:49pm
post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferMI

I agree on the texture issue BUT if you put a very thin layer on, which you can with my white choc. fondant, they will eat it.

Thin is the key in my book.

Jen icon_smile.gif



I'm getting the buttercream DVD soon and I am more than willing to try (want to in fact) try chocolate fondant. I've only used ganache so far because my bc skills aren't great and ganache is so yummy and makes it easier for a novice. Can you tell which recipe do you use? It's the mixture of regular (do you use mmf or mff?) and the chocolate? I'd love to have something that at least I felt like I wasn't doing all this work and expense to just throw away, I mean I could use sculpey if that were the case I mean it is non toxic..lol and if I didn't bake it I could reuse it (J/K).

Win Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 4:58pm
post #23 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danielle1218

I have a couple questions...

I know what MMF is....I make it all the time.

What is MFF?

Also....questions about ganache? Are you frosting a cake with buttercream, then covering with a layer of ganache and THEN putting on a layer of fondant? I have never tried that, but I am open to new things.

Also, are you people pouring ganache on the cake or spreading it on? Whenever I have made ganache for cookies or truffles it is very thin (like right after making it). Are you letting it harden just a bit? I would think pouring warm ganache on a cake would be really messy.




Danielle:

MFF is Michele Foster's Delicious Fondant. Recipe can be found her on cc. I love her recipe and add white chocolate to the warm liquids when making it.

As for ganache, most use it alone, not with buttercream. I think the majority probably allow it to cool then whip it into a frosting, but might be wrong. That is how I use it when I apply it. I just find it more user friendly that way, no having to prop it over a rack to allow it to run off. When I use it warm, I tend to just use it as a "topper" so to speak.

HTH!

milkmaid42 Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 5:09pm
post #24 of 47

Jamie...I am so sorry to keep going off subject. I am literally laughing out loud, just typing lol doesn't really convey my hilarity. I truly must have been living in a cave. I have never heard (seen?) the expression before. Anyway, I will turn this thread back to what it was. Thanks!

Kims_cakes Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 5:25pm
post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Jamie_

Lol milkmaid...yep! It's part of "Wee Fish Ewe A Mare Egrets Moose Panda Hippo Gnu Deer"




Everytime I hear "We wish you.." I think of a coffee mug my mother had with the pictures of the animals and this saying. Too cute!

Cakeonista Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 5:27pm
post #26 of 47

The question I have is if I use ganache under my fondant do I have to put a layer of bc first?? That seems like it would be defeating the purpose. Also, what about customers who do not want chocolate but you still want that flawless finish?

Bel_Anne Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 9:16pm
post #27 of 47

There's a couple of HUGE threads on how to do the ganache under fondant method on this site, but bugger me if I can find them!

Anyway... The ganache technique originated in Sydney at Planet Cake. The way they teach it: Recipe is 2 parts dark chocolate 1 part pure cream. so if you're using 1kg of Choc - you'd need 500ml of cream (I tend to use less cream as I use cheaper chocolate). You just put the cream on the stove and bring it just to the boil then simply pour it over your chocolate. Allow it to sit for a while then stir it til it's smooth. You now either leave it at room temp until it thickens to a peanut butter consistency (which takes a long time) or you can pop it in the fridge/freezer for a little while and bring it out and give it a good stir so there's absolutely no lumps. The key for a perfectly smooth cake is getting that consistency right. It WILL take hours to sit. It's not supposed to be warm when you apply it. There's no buttercream underneath.

Then you just apply to the cake the same way you'd cover with buttercream. To get sharp edges - you apply to the sides first. Smooth it out.. then add to the top - smooth that out.

Then you just leave it to set overnight. When it's hard you use a mixture of apricot jam mixed with boiling water (50/50) then brush that over your cake. That works as a glue for when you apply the fondant. Here's a link to the best vid (from Planet Cake) for covering a ganache cake with fondant.




Good luck!

JenniferMI Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 3:12am
post #28 of 47

Justtoeatcake - My semi-homemade white choc. fondant is made with Pettinice and Mercken's super white chocolate (candy melts). It's SUPER easy to make and really, really good. Because of the oils in the choc. you can roll is much thinner than normal fondant and you never get any crack in it.

Jen icon_smile.gif

icingimages Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 2:53pm
post #29 of 47

I was fortunate enough to spend some time with Julie Bashore at the school of Confectionary Arts in Pennsylvannia. She uses Satin Ice and she insists that people make the fondant extremely thin. Now she is blessed with a fondant rolling machine which many dont have! The Satin Ice tastes good. I use the Fondant with images, so I prefer the Fondarific, which also tastes good but it is a little greasier and doesnt dry out as fast. But thin is the way to go

DelectabilityCakes Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 6:51pm
post #30 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by kimblyd


I just bought the Ace of Cakes book and in it Duff says that fondant should be peeled off and not eaten. I once recommended this to my niece when I was trying to talk her into a fondant covered cake. She told me that some of the icing would come off on the fondant and that would not be acceptable!

I figure why go to the extra expense and effort if it is not appreciated. However, if you really want to use fondant and your cakes are gifts, I say use it and tell 'em Duff said to peel it off!




Seriously, people are just too picky. It's really just about what type of fondant, what brand you're using if it's not homemade, the thickness, the flavor, the texture, etc.

I really honestly do not like Duff from Ace of Cakes.. I might be too sensitive but that offends me that a leading person in the Cake Decorating industry is telling mass amounts of the public that fondant should not be eaten. Now it's going to put people into a mindset that it's inedible and that's ridiculous.

I have people eat my fondant all the time and I continuously take the critiquing as a compliment. Not everyone likes fondant and some people like buttercream or ganache better. Fondant is partially for show but not entirely it's still meant to be eaten as a compliment to the cake.

I use MMF all the time but I'm going to try the WCF next to see what that brings..

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