cai0311 Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 2:07pm
post #1 of

What is the best way to cover a dummy cake with royal icing? What is the best consistancy for the icing? I am getting very frustrated trying to get the icing smooth because it dries so fast. I usually just pull the icing off the styrofoam.

37 replies
ddaigle Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 2:13pm
post #2 of

A little confused here.....are you "icing" your cake with royal? I've only used royal for piping accents or cookies. I will interested in the answers for the knowledge of new information. Sorry I couldn't help.

cai0311 Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 2:32pm
post #3 of

Yes, I am icing the dummy cake with roryal icing. I am making several dummy cakes for my first bridal show. I didn't want them all to be covered in fondant. I wanted two cakes to have the look of buttercream icing, but solid so if people touch the cakes they won't mess up the icing. Is there a different icing I should be using?

weirkd Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 2:37pm
post #4 of

They actually make something that looks like buttercream for dummy cakes. Its called Permaice I think. It dries hard also. Usually places that sell the dummys carry it. Im not sure Global Sugar Art does, but you can check.
When I cover my dummys in fondant, I put RI on it first. I make it rather thick because if you use it when its too wet, it will slide off of it. I dont think the RI will give you the effect your looking for though because BC and RI dry differently, or atleast from my experience. I can look at a BC cake and a RI cake and know the difference.

cai0311 Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 3:02pm
post #5 of

Thanks Weirkd!! That is exactly what I am looking for. Can I use any type of coloring on it?

loopilu Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 5:29pm
post #6 of

probly dont need this now, but Il give it just incase.

I recently covererd and decorated a dummy entirely with royal icing. The recipe as follows:

1 tablespoon of meri white (10g)
90ml Water (5 tablespoons approx)
1lb Icing Sugar (500g)
1 tablespoon of Glycerine

Mix the meri white and water together until dissolved. Add icing sugar gradually mixing with a wooden spoon, and the glycerine and carry on mixing untill the icing stands up in soft peaks and ia a bright white colour.

If using an electric mixer beat on slow speed for 5 mins or until the icing stands in soft peaks.

That is the recipe i used for the covering of the cake, was a good consistency and dried nice and hard although go slowly adding the icing sugar sometimes you dont need all of it, you kind of have to judge it a bit. I covered it with a side scraper and straight edge.

For decoration including the butterfly runouts I used a STRONG icing recipe. Have that recipe if you would like it? See my pics, the daisy/butterfly cake is the one I am talking about.

Lou

indydebi Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 7:21pm
post #7 of

I ice all of my dummies in BC. No vanilla, no dream whip. It hardens like concrete. I pick them up from the sides, they've traveled to numerous shows, and I tell everyone, "Sure! Go ahead! You can touch them!"

Never had a need to use RI for anything cake.

BlakesCakes Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 10:02pm
post #8 of

Several points:

Permaice is very expensive. You color it with acrylic craft paints, so another added expense.

The recipe for RI to ice a cake with is different than the one you use for cookies or accents. The one posted above is excellent. The consistency is that of a thick soup. You put on thin layers, sand out rough spots, and repeat, allowing complete drying between each layer. It's a pain the butt and I'll never do it again.

Indydeb is right--for a true buttercream look, the basic Wilton class recipe without adding any flavorings, milk, creamer, etc. works wonders. Left for a few days, it does dry like concrete. It should be kept away from heat or direct sunlight.

Rae

CakesByLJ Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:27pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by cai0311

What is the best way to cover a dummy cake with royal icing? What is the best consistancy for the icing? I am getting very frustrated trying to get the icing smooth because it dries so fast. I usually just pull the icing off the styrofoam.




Covering dummies with RI used to be done to create displays that would last for many years... it still is a good option if you don't want to use fondant. I preferred to use a RI made with real egg whites/powdered sugar. The consistancy is creamier, less likely to break down and it is much cheaper to make. Ice that styro just like any other cake, spatula method.. Use a spray bottle of water to keep it damp (light mist). When done, let it air dry completely. When dry, you can use a sheet of fine sand paper to give it a smooth finish. hth

indydebi Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 3:39pm

My BC covered dummies have been sitting around for years. It holds up.

loopilu Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 6:13pm

indydebi, can you reccomend a good buttercream recipe? For filling and decorating? There are so many different ones its hard to know what one to use. I have only just started trying out the stuff and don't know whats good and whats not. icon_confused.gif

Lou

indydebi Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 6:23pm

well, I'm a little biased, here, but this one has gotten some good reviews! icon_rolleyes.gif
http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6992/indydebis-crisco-based-buttercream-icing

redheadfairy2003 Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 4:49am

I just asked about this yesterday... I wish I had seen this then...

JuneHawk Posted 30 Jul 2010 , 1:32pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle

A little confused here.....are you "icing" your cake with royal? I've only used royal for piping accents or cookies. I will interested in the answers for the knowledge of new information. Sorry I couldn't help.




I know it's a odd concept here in the US but royal icing is very commonly used in countries like the UK, Australia and South Africa to ice cakes. I'd say it's much more widely used than buttercream.

LadyPol Posted 30 Jan 2012 , 2:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I ice all of my dummies in BC. No vanilla, no dream whip. It hardens like concrete. I pick them up from the sides, they've traveled to numerous shows, and I tell everyone, "Sure! Go ahead! You can touch them!"

Never had a need to use RI for anything cake.




IndyDebi ~ so just the Crisco and the powdered sugar? I have been asked to ice a huge dummy sheet cake for our local theatre and I've never decorated one before. I haven't used RI since my first Wilton class and am much more comfortable with your butter cream icing. This dummy cake has to last a few weeks through several shows (it is brought out at the end of the play) ...

indydebi Posted 30 Jan 2012 , 5:13pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyPol

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I ice all of my dummies in BC. No vanilla, no dream whip. It hardens like concrete. I pick them up from the sides, they've traveled to numerous shows, and I tell everyone, "Sure! Go ahead! You can touch them!"

Never had a need to use RI for anything cake.



IndyDebi ~ so just the Crisco and the powdered sugar? I have been asked to ice a huge dummy sheet cake for our local theatre and I've never decorated one before. I haven't used RI since my first Wilton class and am much more comfortable with your butter cream icing. This dummy cake has to last a few weeks through several shows (it is brought out at the end of the play) ...


You will need to add a liquid ..... milk or water. I omit the dream whip and vanilla because they are flavorings and we're not eating the dummy icing! icon_smile.gif

SweetsbyLadawn Posted 1 Feb 2012 , 3:55am

Thank you all!

proudmary1960 Posted 28 Jul 2013 , 9:15pm

Could someone tell me how to get royal icing to stay soft enough to add dowels and skewers into a dummy cake after frosting it?

maybenot Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 12:38am

Why do you need to dowel/skewer a covered dummy? 

proudmary1960 Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 7:17am

I am entering our fair and it is the theme cake 1/2 sheet and I have made a palm tree out of gum paste and a ride that needs to be put into the top of the styrofoam and other things
 

proudmary1960 Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 7:18am

The palm tree is on a skewer that i need to put into the styrofoam. If the Royal icing gets hard as i have heard then i won't be able to put things that i have made into the dummy cake without it cracking. I have always used Buttercream and not Royal Icing and the fair here will have it for 10 days starting the 14th of next month. In the rules it says no buttercream. Will i be able to frost it and then put the items on into the dummy. Thank you

Annabakescakes Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 7:25am

Yes, it gets hard, but you could always get a cotton ball or swab wet with water, and just wipe it off in a tiny little area where you need to jab your skewer. It melts in an instant when wet, so be careful, and dab the edges dry, before you proceed.

Annabakescakes Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 7:25am

Or poke while it is still wet, obviously.

proudmary1960 Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 8:40pm

Do i do anything to the styrofoam before i ice it? Thank you so much for your help!
 

maybenot Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 8:45pm

I'd decide on the placement of the items before icing the dummy.  I'd poke a hole slightly smaller than my dowel/skewer.  While the icing was still damp, I'd put a toothpick/cocktail stick into the hole and move it around to clear the icing out.  I'd repeat this each time I put on a coat of royal.  As soon as I put on the final coating of royal, I'd insert a dowel/skewer the same size as the supports for the items and I'd leave it there until the royal was dry.  I'd remove it when ready to put on the final decorations.

Annabakescakes Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 8:48pm

AIf you think you would like to use the dummy again, you could tightly wrap it with plastic wrap, to make it easier to clean afterwards.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 9:21pm

I still say, if it's a dummy, that's going to be reused, frost it in Hydrocal (it's a very dense gypsum plaster, used for molds in lost wax casting, and for model railroad scenery that's strong enough to walk on).

 

And whether you're using royal, or Hydrocal, or whatever, if it sets up hard, and you need to put holes in it, there's a wonderful tool for that. It's called a drill.icon_biggrin.gif

Annabakescakes Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 9:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl 

I still say, if it's a dummy, that's going to be reused, frost it in Hydrocal (it's a very dense gypsum plaster, used for molds in lost wax casting, and for model railroad scenery that's strong enough to walk on).

 

And whether you're using royal, or Hydrocal, or whatever, if it sets up hard, and you need to put holes in it, there's a wonderful tool for that. It's called a drill.icon_biggrin.gif

I think I may try your Hyrdrocal one of these days. Is it frosting consistency when mixed to the proper ratios, or more like a slip? 

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 10:27pm

It can be mixed to a range of consistencies, but typically, for model railroad scenery purposes, it's mixed to about a cake batter consistency. Too thick, and it doesn't have enough water to "go off" properly. It's been a few years, but it does thicken significantly as it starts to go off. And you can retard the setting process, if you're planning on piping the stuff, to gain more working time.

 

Plaster of Paris doesn't get nearly as hard, but as I recall, it's slower.

 

And in the traditional model railroad usage, of layering Hydrocal-soaked paper towels over a rough approximation of the desired scenery forms, two layers, properly supported, really are solid enough to walk on.

 

It's been quite a few years since I've used it, myself. I recommend looking for books and/or videos on model railroad scenery.

Annabakescakes Posted 29 Jul 2013 , 11:37pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl 

It can be mixed to a range of consistencies, but typically, for model railroad scenery purposes, it's mixed to about a cake batter consistency. Too thick, and it doesn't have enough water to "go off" properly. It's been a few years, but it does thicken significantly as it starts to go off. And you can retard the setting process, if you're planning on piping the stuff, to gain more working time.

 

Plaster of Paris doesn't get nearly as hard, but as I recall, it's slower.

 

And in the traditional model railroad usage, of layering Hydrocal-soaked paper towels over a rough approximation of the desired scenery forms, two layers, properly supported, really are solid enough to walk on.

 

It's been quite a few years since I've used it, myself. I recommend looking for books and/or videos on model railroad scenery.

I have worked on a railroad :-) my mom and her husband owned a model shop when I was a young teen, for about 2 years. They had a huge one in the window, but the window was covered because it was in "disrepair" to be kind. The hills were mostly fine, so I never had to do that, but I remember painting and painting and painting and painting.... and applying textures everywhere, grass (more like green flocking, paint glue on, then sprinkle the grass), cement, asphalt, trees, snow... I also got to spoon this crud that looked like pin oatmeal mixed with white glue all over, to make gravel for the train yard. I loved being able to open merchandise to fix up the set. I had a $30 limit (in the early 90's) and it couldn't be the last one of that item. I would also have to write the description and UPC on a binder I wish I had a picture. I didn't choose to have it as a hobby, I was just always grounded, so I had to go with them and sit for 5 hours doing nothing, so I did the train set. I was pretty proud of it. It was HUGE 8' square, with a big hole in the middle that had a "plug" of sorts that fit in that had scenery on it,  so I could take it out and squeeze in the middle to work on that part. 

 

I also made decorated train cookies for model train meetings, and airplane cookies for model airplane meetings. 

 

All the geeky model dudes (no offense, lol) would tell me I was the perfect woman, and they wanted to marry me, and then they would find out I was 12 or 13, and they would look like pervs. lol To be fair, I looked at least 17 or 18. 

 

I bet it would be so fun to do a whole scene on a cake, with edible media for a "model train enthusiast" , but would cost a PRETTY PENNY! It would take all week. 

 

Bringing it back around to the OP, Is there another product that is similar, but maybe not as strong that could be used? Is this stuff water proof, or would it disintegrate? Do you have to use special paints?

Sandable or easy to smooth? 

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