Smaller Cakes W/larger Ones Stacked On Top

Decorating By Jenni Updated 1 Jan 2010 , 8:42pm by HarleyDee

Jenni Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 9:40pm
post #1 of 25

Here's the deal: my sister saw a picture of a cake she really wants me to make for her wedding that has a series of small (prob. 6 in cakes) arranged in a circle with larger cakes stacked on top. I was planning to do a version of this but cant for the life of me figure how to assemble this cake so that it is STURDY for 1 hr. transportation. I am a fan of the SPS but how on earth could i do this: I figured I would place a round 10" dummy cake in the center of the circle of 6" cakes. Then stack a 12", 10" 8" and 6" on top of that...so I COULD assemble when I get there but I am afraid to wait just in case it doesnt work out like I planned. I also am afraid of the 6" cakes getting "squished" by the weight of the other cakes stacked on top. Gosh I hope this makes sense b/c this is all I can think about. I have time--the wedding is 3 months away--but i need to sort this out in my head!!!
SO-Has anyone ever stacked larger cakes on a circle of smaller cakes before and how did you do it so that the weight is evenly distributed??

24 replies
bashini Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 9:47pm
post #2 of 25

I have seen lot of these cakes. I think its Colette Peter's design. If you can find " Colette's Wedding Cakes " book, that particular cake is in there. Here is the cake, its in the the 7th row, the cake in the middle.

http://www.colettescakes.com/wedding_cc.html#

KHalstead Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 10:01pm
post #3 of 25

all you would do is just dowel each of the small cakes near the edge and then the larger cake sits centered on all of those dowels. I would think you're idea with the cake dummy should work and would be much less stressfull!

I think a 10" dummy would be perfect...maybe even a 9" dummy, make sure your 6" cakes are just slightly shorter than the cake dummy....then your other cakes should just literally float right over top of the 6" cakes with no problems.

Jenni Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 10:18pm
post #4 of 25

Yeppers--its a Collette design for sure...my sister aims for the top and LORD HELP ME!! I resisted doing her wedding cake b/c I only do "fun" cakes--bdays and shower cakes--but no weddings! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for your responses! I need to wrap my head around this now so that I can stay sane! Whew...

Jenni Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 10:21pm
post #5 of 25

oh-and one more thing...Should the dummy cake be strong enough to support the weight of 12", 10", 8" and 6" cakes on top? do I just use the SPS system with the dummy cake too and should that keep me in the clear for travel??

PattyT Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 10:49pm
post #6 of 25

Just saw similar on Amazing Wedding Cakes on WE Network. Merci Beaucoup Cakes did it. They called them "satellite" cakes. They had to assemble on site because the board needed to hold all the satellite cakes was too big to fit through their doorway. I think they had the main part assembled for travel, but the board and the little cakes were separate. I saw them put hollow dowels on the edges.

Here's a link to the cake picture: http://www.wetv.com/photo-galleries/amazing-wedding-cakes-merci-beaucoup-cakes/arboretum.html

Here's the episode guide: http://www.wetv.com/amazing-wedding-cakes/episodes/fantasy-arboretum-retro-fabric

It's airing again January 1, if that helps you at all.

cas17 Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 10:51pm
post #7 of 25

i wonder if you could hot glue the dummy to the cake base and the underside of the 12" board? then you could just SPS the 10, 8 and 6" cakes but leave the 12" put. the bottom 6" ers could be slid into place at the venue.

Jenni Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 10:53pm
post #8 of 25

Yep again! That's exactly the design. I'm totally watching that...Thank you!! I need all the help and advice I can get!

mirda6275 Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 11:51pm
post #9 of 25

careful using sps with this design. i made a 2-tier grill cake, 10" top tier, 8" lottom tier and tried to use the sps plates/pillars, but the pillars wound up on the outside of the 8"

don't know if that made any sense, good luck with this wedding cake!

indydebi Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 12:05am
post #10 of 25

For you young 'uns on here .... icon_rolleyes.gif

That design isn't really new. I believe it's in this book ( http://cgi.ebay.com/Celebrate-Wedding-Cakes-by-Wilton_W0QQitemZ400094643070QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Nonfiction_Book?hash=item5d277fc37e ) a number of times, and this book came out in 1986. It's been around a LONG time.

I made one similar. I set the main cake on top of a styrofoam. The styro was 4" tall and the satellite cakes just fit under them. Adding the support rod on the edges, as mentioned above is a very good idea and will help with the support, but I didn't use them. The styro that the main cake sat on worked fine.

What was old is new again to a new generation! thumbs_up.gif

janeoxo Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 12:20am
post #11 of 25

Just another thought, how much cake do you actually need, do the small cakes need to be real? Could they not be dummies?

cownsj Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 12:52am
post #12 of 25

Would this be of help to you? It's Wilton's Lady Windemere-Look 4 Arm Base
http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E314507-475A-BAC0-54AC7571827C3EC5&killnav=1

madgeowens Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 1:14am
post #13 of 25

Thats a gorgeous cake. Good Luck with it, I am sure it will be great!

cheatize Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 3:10am
post #14 of 25

Wilton's Tiered Cakes book, the cake is called Lace Flair, picture on page 4, instructions on page 64. You can pm me for me specifics, if you like.

Texas_Rose Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 3:16am
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by PattyT

They had to assemble on site because the board needed to hold all the satellite cakes was too big to fit through their doorway.




That's actually a very good thing to mention. Anything you build is going to have to make it out your front door.

Jenni Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 3:55am
post #17 of 25

Thank you to everyone! My mind is a bit more at ease now! I am not fully decided if I will try to figure out a way to assemble before transporting or just wait til I get there...
I am so afraid of a toppling cake! Especially with a dummy styro cake for the base...seems too top heavy to travel with. Thanks again to everyone and please keep the ideas coming if you got 'em!

KHalstead Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 12:53pm
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mirda6275

careful using sps with this design. i made a 2-tier grill cake, 10" top tier, 8" lottom tier and tried to use the sps plates/pillars, but the pillars wound up on the outside of the 8"

don't know if that made any sense, good luck with this wedding cake!




what you should have done was just used the 6" sps under your 10" cake. I know it doesn't seem right having only a 6" board under a 10" cake, but it works. The sps plate going into your 8" cake HAS to be smaller than your cake or it will split your cake. As long as you have a sturdy cardboard or foam core under your 10" cake it will sit nicely on a 6" sps plate. HTH for future endeavors

KHalstead Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 1:00pm
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenni

Thank you to everyone! My mind is a bit more at ease now! I am not fully decided if I will try to figure out a way to assemble before transporting or just wait til I get there...
I am so afraid of a toppling cake! Especially with a dummy styro cake for the base...seems too top heavy to travel with. Thanks again to everyone and please keep the ideas coming if you got 'em!




Just wanted to share from experience, I'm still fairly new at cake decorating (been dabbling for a little over 2 yrs. now and am self taught thanks to CC) and I find it a LOT less stressfull to stack on site. Yes, you get people watching you once in a while, but it's nothing compared to looking back in your trunk and seeing a 4 tiered cake wobble back and forth only to realize when you turn back around that the car that was 50 ft. ahead of you has suddenly slammed on their brakes and is now 2 ft. in front of you!!!!

I would definitely assemble this cake on site. Get into that reception hall as early as they will let you and give yourself plenty of time. If you think it will take you an hr. to set up...give yourself 2 hrs. Once the cake is assembled and standing, it should be sturdy to stand all night!

Just for your own sanity....might not be a bad idea to go ahead and shove some sps into that dummy cake, so their will be NO WORRIES about structure and stability and that way you can actually enjoy your sisters wedding as everyone awes at what you've pulled off in the form of cake!!

Keep in mind if you've got a 12" bottom cake on the 10" dummy, you're going to want to get ahold of a 9" sps plate to go into the dummy. You could even put the 12" cake on a piece of wood as well, then you know that puppy is sturdy to hold all that weight. I don't think there are any worries about the styro squishing though. I had some big cake dummies that I thought (I'll never cover something this huge for ANY reason) they were like 18" squares or something (can you imagine rolling out fondant for that?) Well, I glued 4 of them together and covered it in fabric and it sits in the corner of my liv. room as a little seat and I've sat on plenty and TRUST me.......I weigh a LOT more than your cake will EVER dream of weighing and I didn't notice it squishing at all........although like I said, there was 4 layers.

indydebi Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 3:57pm
post #20 of 25

you dont' travel with the main cake on top of the stryo. Assemble it there. Place the stryo in the middle of the table, then just sit the main cake on top of it.

Jenni Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 6:04pm
post #21 of 25

thanks for your input Khalstead, I am a self-taught decorator too and have to learn by trial and error. Only I dont want to make an experiment out of my sisters wedding cake!
indydebi--do you mean that I can assemble the rest of the tiers (besides the styro bottom) and then set them on top of the stryo base and satellite cakes when I get to the reception? The only reason I would assemble ANY of the cake layers is b/c one of the layers will have fondant kind of flowing down to the next layer...those are the 8" and 10" layers. I am afraid if I wait to assemble it at the reception, the fondant will crack when I position it.

indydebi Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 6:33pm
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenni

I am so afraid of a toppling cake! Especially with a dummy styro cake for the base...seems too top heavy to travel with.


Assuming you have a 3-tier cake, then the small satellite cakes 'under' the 3-tier cake.

The way I did my cake like this ....
Assemble the 3-tier cake.
Upon arrival at the venue, set the styrofoam base on the table.
Arrange the satellite cakes around the styro.
If the heights are right, the satellites will be 4" tall, which is exactly the height of the styro.
Set the 3-tier cake on top of the styro. The satellites will be slightly tucked under the 3-tier.
The styro supported my 3 tier just fine and I didn't need any dowels in the satellites at all.

Now if your design has the fondant flowing from the base of the 3-tier onto the satellites, then don't do it this way. You'd need to pre-assemble the whole thing and make sure your base board can get thru car doors and doorways! (and that you have a couple of people to help your carry it!) thumbs_up.gif

KHalstead Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 6:50pm
post #23 of 25

I totally wanna do one of these cakes now!! lol

Jenni Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 7:22pm
post #24 of 25

Ok, gotcha! I think I will do just that indydebi. Thanks a ton! This is such a big venture for me and I want it to be everything my sister imagined! I think I can I think I can I think I can... icon_smile.gif

HarleyDee Posted 1 Jan 2010 , 8:42pm
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

For you young 'uns on here .... icon_rolleyes.gif
That design isn't really new. I believe it's in this book ( http://cgi.ebay.com/Celebrate-Wedding-Cakes-by-Wilton_W0QQitemZ400094643070QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Nonfiction_Book?hash=item5d277fc37e ) a number of times, and this book came out in 1986. It's been around a LONG time.




Sylvia Weinstock does a lot of them too, doesn't she?

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