P/s On Black Fondant Question...

Decorating By jfroman Updated 5 Jan 2010 , 5:34pm by tinygoose

jfroman Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 5:20am
post #1 of 19

I have a cake order with a black loopy bow and black fondant accents-I was wondering how you go about getting the powdered sugar or cornstarch from rolling out the fondant off. Do I wait until after the peices for the bow are dry and then brush it with a little water...? It seems like there has to be a better way...any suggestions would be great!! Thanks!

18 replies
tootie0809 Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 5:28am
post #2 of 19

No do not put water on them! I always spray my cakes and decorations with some cooking spray (like Pam or Crisco in the spray can) and then gently rub off the excess sugar or corn starch with a paper towel. It shines everything up and makes them look nice and clean. Wait until the bow loops are good and dry before doing this and rub very, very gently.

Cake_Mooma Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 5:41am
post #3 of 19

I use cooking spray but I use the original flavor, not the butter flavored one. I think that the butter flavored spray is a bit greasy. Be sure to let it dry and it is a very, i mean very light spray. Hope it helps.

Vic

Cake_Mooma Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 5:42am
post #4 of 19

oh it also works great on red. Actually dark colors/shades not just for black.

BlakesCakes Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 10:32pm
post #5 of 19

The simplest way to deal with PS or CS residue on fondant is to NOT USE PS or CS when rolling it out. Save a step, avoid a mess.

Roll out the fondant or gum paste on a light smear of crisco instead of CS or PS. You can do this on a countertop, plastic cutting/place mat, piece of vinyl, or silicone mat.

I cut with a non stick pizza wheel by OXO or my PME small cutting wheel so that I don't cut thru the mat (I use medium weight vinyl from WalMart fabric dept.), but if you use a knife or other sharp tool to cut the strips, I'd advise cutting it on a plastic cutting board or mat.

HTH
Rae

sweetflowers Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 11:01pm
post #6 of 19

I gently steam my entire cake.

Cake_Mooma Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 8:12am
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

The simplest way to deal with PS or CS residue on fondant is to NOT USE PS or CS when rolling it out. Save a step, avoid a mess.

Roll out the fondant or gum paste on a light smear of crisco instead of CS or PS. You can do this on a countertop, plastic cutting/place mat, piece of vinyl, or silicone mat.

I cut with a non stick pizza wheel by OXO or my PME small cutting wheel so that I don't cut thru the mat (I use medium weight vinyl from WalMart fabric dept.), but if you use a knife or other sharp tool to cut the strips, I'd advise cutting it on a plastic cutting board or mat.

HTH
Rae





I have tried this before and all I had was a hot mess. icon_cry.gif I ended up with greasy fondant and all stuck to the table....I don't konw what I did wrong but I know that I did something really wrong. icon_twisted.gif So I stick with the ps and use spary when I am done rolling it out. I think that I have to give the crisco thing another try.

Vic

loopilu Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 1:16pm
post #8 of 19

I use trex, which i think is uk version of us crisco when ever I use black icing. I think the trick is not to use too much, it tends to go further than you first think! Here are two cakes I made in black with trex...

U might have to bear with me, I dont know if I am attatchin these right?! lol

loopilu Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 1:19pm
post #9 of 19

il try again

loopilu Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 1:20pm
post #10 of 19

ooohh,! I cant add files! lol Have a look in my pics if you would like to see icon_redface.gif

cakesrock Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 6:09pm
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

The simplest way to deal with PS or CS residue on fondant is to NOT USE PS or CS when rolling it out. Save a step, avoid a mess.

Roll out the fondant or gum paste on a light smear of crisco instead of CS or PS. You can do this on a countertop, plastic cutting/place mat, piece of vinyl, or silicone mat.

I cut with a non stick pizza wheel by OXO or my PME small cutting wheel so that I don't cut thru the mat (I use medium weight vinyl from WalMart fabric dept.), but if you use a knife or other sharp tool to cut the strips, I'd advise cutting it on a plastic cutting board or mat.

HTH
Rae



Totally agree with Blakescakes! I have tried CS and PS and it was a disaster! I only use Crisco and a cutting board (for colors that can stain). I'll use the counter for white fondant. Make sure you use some crisco on your rolling pin too! Use a pasta maker to roll your stips evenly for the ribbon/bow (if you have one) then cut to desired length icon_biggrin.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 31 Dec 2009 , 9:42pm
post #12 of 19

I guess the only thing is can say is that with the crisco/trex, less is best.

I swipe my index and middle fingers across the crisco, gathering probably less than 1/4th tsp of shortening, and then smear it across my entire mat--a piece of vinyl 24x24 inches. If I can see crisco when I'm finished smearing, I wipe it away.

I then rub my hands over my rolling pin--I use the Wilton white vinyl pins.

When rolling the fondant, I roll 3 or 4 times in one direction, pick up the fondant and rotate it about a 1/4th turn. If you keep rolling in the same direction and never turning the piece, it will stick badly because the friction will melt both the fondant and the crisco.

Roll, lift, rotate, roll, lift, rotate. Pop air bubbles with a fine pin--although I rarely get very many.

HTH
Rae

jfroman Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 5:01am
post #13 of 19

thanks guys-i did just steam them and that worked really well. next time i will deffinately use the crisco instead. thanks again!

Cakepro Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 6:21am
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes


Roll, lift, rotate, roll, lift, rotate.
HTH
Rae




I used a straight rolling pin for 11 years until I blew out my back and got one of those amazing 18" commercial grade aluminum rolling pins and WOWZERS, I can't believe I used a straight pin for more than a decade.

Here's my routine...pat, pat, pat, pat (that's my little bag of cornstarch), plop (down goes my flattened ball of fondant), roll, roll, roll....use my old Wilton pin to drape the fondant over it...transfer to cake. icon_biggrin.gif

Your mileage may vary. icon_smile.gif

ikklejo Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 4:51pm
post #15 of 19

I did have this problem loads until someone on here told me to steam afterwards only I didnt have one but now use the steam steeing on my iron on the whole cake when done - works brill so thanks for that tip! icon_smile.gif

jfroman Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 5:18pm
post #16 of 19

steam setting on an iron-duh! thats a good idea! lol-when i was thinking what i could use to steam my bow all i thought of was holding my peices over a pot of boiling water...which worked, but the iron would have been a lot quicker icon_smile.gif

allissweets Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 5:32pm
post #17 of 19

When y'all use the steam setting on your iron, does the fondant piece remain shiny? I saw a post on here that said it gives them shine when using steam...also saw this technique on cake boss, so I wanted to give it a try. Tried steaming some little fondant balls, but the shine went away after several minutes. Am I missing a step?

jenmat Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 5:32pm
post #18 of 19

I was watching Jennifer Dontz's video and she airbrushes her cakes with vodka or lemon extract to remove any smudges. Then it evaporates. Highly recommend her video- it was awesome!

tinygoose Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 5:34pm
post #19 of 19

I always airbrush with vodka, works wonderfully. You could use a brush too, the brush should be damp not wet.

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