Quilting Pattern

Decorating By Ashley0415 Updated 31 Jan 2010 , 11:38pm by JenniferMI

Ashley0415 Posted 28 Dec 2009 , 9:37pm
post #1 of 32

So.. Im making my grandmothers birthday cake.. and I want to put the quilted pattern on the fondant.. I have a three diamond pattern, but the one other time I practiced this, I dont think I did it right.. I pierced through the fondant with the press.. am I just supposed to press, but not cut through? I also want it to look puffy, and I read adding extra buttercream under the fondant will do that.. any tips would be great.. you guys always have the answer! and I have to make the cake tonight..

Thanks so much!

Ashley

31 replies
_Jamie_ Posted 28 Dec 2009 , 10:07pm
post #2 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashley0415

So.. Im making my grandmothers birthday cake.. and I want to put the quilted pattern on the fondant.. I have a three diamond pattern, but the one other time I practiced this, I dont think I did it right.. I pierced through the fondant with the press.. am I just supposed to press, but not cut through? I also want it to look puffy, and I read adding extra buttercream under the fondant will do that.. any tips would be great.. you guys always have the answer! and I have to make the cake tonight..

Thanks so much!

Ashley




I have the 3 diamond cutter from Jennifer Dontz...one of the best tools I own. Personally, I press in until it almost cuts. Then, you go over each line with a stiching wheel like this: http://kiwicakes.co.nz/kiwi/images/PME%20cutting%20wheel.jpg I don't put anymore BC than normal when I make a quilted cake. Also, instead of the wheel, I use a long point gumpaste tool sometimes. Same thing, but none of the stich marks.

JenniferMI Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 3:01pm
post #3 of 32

Hi Ashley!

My method is this: Normal layer of BC under a thin layer of my semi-homemade white chocolate fondant. You press the tool (3 diamond quilter) into the fondant (for a round cake, rock it once to the left and once to the right). You don't cut thru the fondant. Then go over the pattern with a stitch wheel. I like the larger toothed one myself. SO SO easy to do! The stitch wheel is what really puffs the whole design out.

See below:
Jen icon_smile.gif
LL

_Jamie_ Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 3:45pm
post #4 of 32

Lol--there's the master's demo right there! Yes--rock it back and forth, I do that too, didn't think to explain it that way though.

JenniferMI Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 4:08pm
post #5 of 32

icon_smile.gif

On square cakes, no need to rock it because you are pressing on a flat surface.

HTH!

Jen icon_smile.gif

Sagebrush Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 4:41pm
post #6 of 32

Question... when you're doing an all over pattern like this, do you end up with a seam in the back where things don't match up?

Is there a way (maybe not with this pattern press, but at least with patterns that you have to do more freehand) to evenly space the pattern all the way around so you don't have a place that HAS to be the back?

- Leisel

JenniferMI Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 4:43pm
post #7 of 32

Leisel -

This is what I do.... I start out in the back of the cake. As I get near the back I eye it up to see how many more impressions will fit on this cake. Then, I space them a bit further apart or squeeze them a bit closer together so I come out pretty darn good in the back.

Jen icon_smile.gif

_Jamie_ Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 4:44pm
post #8 of 32

I started on the front of the cake one time. Realized what I did....never again. Ouch!

JenniferMI Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 4:46pm
post #9 of 32

Nope, not a good idea Jamie...... we live and learn huh....

Happy New Year everyone!

Jen icon_smile.gif

MaryAllison Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 5:00pm
post #10 of 32

Thank you all for sharing your technique!

Sagebrush Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 5:13pm
post #11 of 32

Thanks, Jennifer...

I'm a bit (HA!)of a perfectionist.

That doesn't just mean wanting to do a great job... it tends to mean setting the bar for good enough way beyond what it needs to be for other people to think you did a great job, generally into the absolutely impossible to actually accomplish range.

So if left to my own devices, nothing is ever good enough and I'm always seriously frustrated with my efforts. It helps to know what REALLY constitutes good enough.

- Leisel

JenniferMI Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 5:22pm
post #12 of 32

Leisel -

We are always our own worst critic...but...they can be good because it only makes us strive to be better icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif

Sagebrush Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 5:46pm
post #13 of 32

Yep... improving your work = good.

But... shutting down and giving up because you cannot bend the laws of space and time to make the impossible happen = not so good.

From my own experience I would say true perfectionism is really a mental disorder... very like OCD. Most people just use the word to mean driven to excel, but that's not really the full extent of it.

Oh... here's a better explanation via Wikipedia:

Quote:
Quote:

Hamachek describes two types of perfectionism. Normal perfectionists "derive a very real sense of pleasure from the labours of a painstaking effort" while neurotic perfectionists are "unable to feel satisfaction because in their own eyes they never seem to do things [well] enough to warrant that feeling of satisfaction". Burns defines perfectionists as "people who strain compulsively and unremittingly toward impossible goals and who measure their own worth entirely in terms of productivity and accomplishment".[1]




I'm more along the lines of Hamachek's definition of neurotic perfectionist, or Burns definition of perfectionist.

And one of the symptoms or side effects of that type of perfectionism is procrastination or outright avoidance. I can't tell you how many times I've not done things (even things I really wanted to do, or things that would cost me good amounts of money by not doing them) because I couldn't work out exactly the right way to go about it in my head. It's stupid behavior, and yet I usually can't stop it, even when I recognize it.

LOL... and now that's probably WAY more info than anyone was interested in.

- Leisel

_Jamie_ Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 5:52pm
post #14 of 32

Yeah-I'm a perfectionist with my cakes. Wouldn't have it any other way. icon_smile.gif

JenniferMI Posted 29 Dec 2009 , 5:53pm
post #15 of 32

icon_smile.gif

Ashley0415 Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 12:22am
post #16 of 32

Thank you all so much for the tips! I'll be sure to post pics of the cake.

JenniferMI Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 12:44am
post #17 of 32

Can't wait to see it Ashley!

Jen icon_smile.gif

JessDesserts Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 2:48am
post #18 of 32

i' d very much like to try this.

Any ideas where I can purchase this 3 diamond quilter online? And, I know someone said "the larger one", is there a specific size I should looke for?

Last question icon_redface.gif , if im going to try it on a mini cake, does that change the size of the quilter I should use?

Thanks so much to whomever takes a sec to answer me!!

Jess

JenniferMI Posted 30 Dec 2009 , 3:34am
post #19 of 32

PM me Jess, I can help.

Jen icon_smile.gif

sburros Posted 3 Jan 2010 , 5:02am
post #20 of 32

I was wondering where I can buy the 3 diamond cutter? I am making my daughter's birthday cake this weekend and need one for my top tier!

_Jamie_ Posted 3 Jan 2010 , 5:03am
post #21 of 32

Without looking it up myself.....just google Jennifer Dontaz Sugardelites. That's where I got mine. One of my favorite tools. icon_smile.gif

_Jamie_ Posted 3 Jan 2010 , 5:04am
post #22 of 32

Dontz. Not Dontaz...sheesh.

sburros Posted 3 Jan 2010 , 5:19am
post #23 of 32

Oh great.. I just found it online, I will have to see if they can ship it FAST for me! Lol, I always wait too long. I noticed the one on her site is just one diamond, where the others I have seen are 3 in a row. Is this easier to use do you think?

_Jamie_ Posted 3 Jan 2010 , 5:26am
post #24 of 32

No, she has the one I'm talking about, it's a three diamond cutter. It'smade out of copper....PM her and ask her to link you straight to it. She's JenniferMI, a few posters back on this thread....just noticed that, duh! She has a link to her site.

CandyCU Posted 3 Jan 2010 , 8:11am
post #25 of 32

Hi, I've never heard or seen a copper quilter.

I have the Diamond Patchwork Cutter which is plastic so is ever so slightly flexible, I find it makes it easier to position around the cake. Info is at http://www.patchworkcutters.co.uk/catalogue_details.asp?product_id=29&group=0 but I found mine at me local cake decorators supply store and it was fairly cheap.

HTH!

Cathy26 Posted 4 Jan 2010 , 9:16pm
post #26 of 32

Ok, so i just can't hold out any longer Im buying your diamon cutter Jennifer, that pink and pearl cake is seriously making me sick with envy i must use this quilting technique!! ive been trying to stop buying stuff so Im holding you completely responsible for me going off the beaten track. I loved the quilting on your blue and gold rose cake and now i just cant resist it anymore!!

JenniferMI Posted 4 Jan 2010 , 9:24pm
post #27 of 32

LOL! OMG the pressure...... icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif

Cathy26 Posted 4 Jan 2010 , 9:59pm
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferMI

LOL! OMG the pressure...... icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif





just bought it!! so excited - also got a flowery lace mould, been wanting one for ages. really want to do a quilted lacey flower wedding cake with pearl boarders for my shop window when it opens - people wont have seen anything like it over here, just can't wait!

JenniferMI Posted 4 Jan 2010 , 10:13pm
post #29 of 32

Thanks so much Cathy! If I can help you, don't hesitate to ask.

Jen icon_smile.gif

AverageMom Posted 31 Jan 2010 , 6:00pm
post #30 of 32

I want to make a quilted pattern cake....for this weekend. Unfortunately, I do not have the impression tool. Are there any tips for doing this free hand? Am I going to want to stab myself in the eye with an ice pick when I'm done?!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%