Bridal Show Literature

Business By tootie0809 Updated 6 Jan 2010 , 1:23pm by tracycakes

tootie0809 Posted 26 Dec 2009 , 4:27pm
post #1 of 26

I'm gearing up for my 1st bridal show next month. I know I need to have my business cards and some type of brochure or flyer to hand out as well, but I don't know what is better. Also, I really don't know what to write on the brochure/flyer. Do I include my pricing information or more general information with lots of pictures of my cakes? Is it a good idea to put your terms like reservations, cancellations, etc. in the literature? Should I include flavors, etc? Sorry for so many questions, but I don't want to spend all the money to have these printed up without getting some good advice from those of you who have done this. Also, does anyone have a brochure or flyer they have used in a bridal show that they care to share with me? Thanks!

25 replies
indydebi Posted 26 Dec 2009 , 5:00pm
post #2 of 26

Keep them generic so you can use them for non-bridal show hand-outs. A picture says a thousand words so more photos, less narrative. Reservations, cancellation info, basic contract info .... that's what you cover in your sampling appt, not in a brochure. Name, address, email and phone number at the bottom of every page of the brochure/flyer.

Any narrative should have a "what's in it for the bride?" focus. Why should she call YOU instead of someone else? What do you offer that others don't?

Pricing is subjective .... if you don't foresee a price increase anytime soon, then putting pricing on there is helpful. I usually encourage some kind of pricing info, but at least put a disclaimer of "pricing subject to change without notice" on there.

Lots of color and pizzaz. When a bride goes home after the show and dumps her bag of goodies on her kitchen table, you want YOUR literature to stand out and get her attention. No black and white cards, no lots-of-narrative literature.

I used a full page flyer that I'm happy to share. Send me an email so I can reply with the attachment.

tootie0809 Posted 26 Dec 2009 , 6:41pm
post #3 of 26

Thanks so much Debi for the info! I really appreciate it. Yes, I would love to see the flyer you use. I will email you now. icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 26 Dec 2009 , 7:01pm
post #4 of 26

I do biz cards ONLY at a bridal show. My purpose is to drive them to my website. They will be completely overloaded with info at the January shows.

PinkLisa Posted 26 Dec 2009 , 10:15pm
post #5 of 26

My sister uses larger than normal business cards to hand out at bridal shows. They are about 4" x 4" squares. They have several pictures on them and her vital information. They are very attractive and a bit different given their size. I'm concerned that a normal sized business card would get lost in the shuffle of all their other paperwork they gather that day.

jillmakescakes Posted 26 Dec 2009 , 10:50pm
post #6 of 26

I typically do the business cards, a brochure and a business card magnet ("because traditional cards get lost in the shuffle") I usually get the peel n stick kind from Office Depot

costumeczar Posted 27 Dec 2009 , 12:07am
post #7 of 26

The January shows are so many and so big, keep the literature small and to the point. What tends to happen is the brides will get overwhelmed and start shoving everything into their bag, then dump it out at the end of the day. The best thing to do is to have memorable display cakes, then follow up by emailing people if the show gives you a mailing list of registered brides.

TALK to as many brides as you can, don't just hand out samples. The more that you're able to engage people in conversation the better they'll remember you at the end of the day. If you can get someone else to come with you to hand out samples so that you can concentrate on talking to people, that would be best.

indydebi Posted 27 Dec 2009 , 12:23am
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

TALK to as many brides as you can, don't just hand out samples.



Excellent advice.

Some show-conversation tips I've shared with others:
-"Are you shopping for your cake today or do you have that taken care of?"....... this lets you weed out the lookers vs. the actual shoppers. Some shows have a card they require the brides to get signed by all vendors for some drawing. The idea is to get the brides to visit all the vendors. But if they've already gotten their cake, they're only showing up to get you to sign the card.

If they already have it taken care of, I follow with a "Oh it's always great to see an organized bride!" then subtley go to the next bride.

- For those who are shopping, the next key is "When is your date?" If the date is close, I tell them, "You really have a good bit of time but it will go faster than you think." If the date is out there, I compliment them with "Oh good, a bride who is starting early! I like to see that!"

I've run into a few brides where their date was in the next 60 days. I put on my gramma face and tell them, "Girl, you better git on it!" They always laugh and agree with "I know! I know!" I definitely hand these ladies my literature/card and tell them "Check my website ....all the pricing is right on there ... then give me a call on Monday and we'll get you in for your sampling right away!"

As costumeczar points out, the key is to engage them in conversation and get them to remember you. THese are just a few ideas on how to get that conversation started.

susiekoos Posted 27 Dec 2009 , 12:31am
post #9 of 26

I hand out buisness cards and refer them to my web site for information.
I also have two 20 page photo albums for them to look through and individual samples of cake to either sample right there or they can take it with them. This also allows me to spend more time talking then serving cake. I love it ! It's intense but fun 3 hours icon_smile.gif

tootie0809 Posted 27 Dec 2009 , 2:48pm
post #10 of 26

I'm so glad I asked this. I'm getting lots of great ideas to come prepared with! This is a 2-day show, and it's the biggest one in my area (although not the only one, there are like 6-8 others going on in January), so as the day approaches nearer, I'm getting more and more nervous and a bit overwhelmed. Thank you all for such great advice!

Jenn2179 Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 3:19am
post #11 of 26

I use oversized postcards that I have printed at Vistaprint. My husband designed them and they don't get lost and stand out more than a business card. The front has a collage of pictures and the back has info. I get many people tell me they saw my postcard and it drew them to my website and then to meet. Since they are bigger they stand out more than a business card. I also have custom pens which are very popular. I get them from discountmugs.com

emrldsky Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 1:50pm
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenn2179

I use oversized postcards that I have printed at Vistaprint. My husband designed them and they don't get lost and stand out more than a business card. The front has a collage of pictures and the back has info. I get many people tell me they saw my postcard and it drew them to my website and then to meet. Since they are bigger they stand out more than a business card. I also have custom pens which are very popular. I get them from discountmugs.com




I was just going to suggest and over-sized postcard. I work for an IT communications area and we've found GREAT success and feedback on the size of those pieces. They're larger than a business card, so they'll stand out, but they're smaller than a full sheet, limiting the urge to add too much information.

Good luck!

cylstrial Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 2:07pm
post #13 of 26

Here's an old thread about brocheres! You have to go back to page 1 and 2 to see the examples. Hope this helps!

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=614677&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

tootie0809 Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 4:29pm
post #14 of 26

Oh thank you for the link to this other thread! Very helpful!

I have another question. What is the best thing to wear to a bridal show? Should I do a chef coat, have a T-shirt made with my name and logo, or just wear something nice and classy? Also, my husband and sister are going to be helping me at the show by handing out samples and answering some questions. What should they wear?

Jenn2179 Posted 2 Jan 2010 , 7:19pm
post #15 of 26

I wear jeans, a pink chef's coat with my name and business name. The people who help me wear white shirts and black pants. Make sure they know prices and if they get more detailed questions tell them bring the bride to you to answer them.

Auntie_RaRa Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 6:25pm
post #16 of 26

A great topic and advice given.

I also find that creating my own signage in my booth is a definite plus! Most places have that white cardstock with black letters on it hanging in each booth. I had my signage created and it includes lots of very big pictures of different styles of cakes. That also worked as a conversation piece as I'm talking about pricing and styles of cakes. I tend to have my booth coordinated with linens for tables, my signage and yes even the dress attire for myself and helpers. The first time I did it, so many compliment the cohesive look.

Good luck!

Auntie_RaRa Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 8:40pm
post #17 of 26

I thought I would post some pictures of the signage I used in the fall bridal show. The booth is a 10x10, so my graphics person calculated the size for each poster.


I wish I had a photographer to take pictures of the day. The booth was super crowded. It was funny because people were standing in line like they were waiting to get a ticket to a movie. They were so patient. Me and my helpers had to encourage people to come around.

edit to add smaller size photos
LL
LL

cakedout Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 8:49pm
post #18 of 26

Dress like the professional you are! thumbs_up.gif

Our booth had a chocolate brown and pink theme, so my partner and I wore our chef's coats and brown dress slacks.

In my earlier years, I wore a classy pant suit: 1 year it was black, another year it was a champagne color.

Just remember to wear comfortable shoes! icon_wink.gif

Jenn2179 Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 9:03pm
post #19 of 26

Your booth looks great and is HUGE. I am having a booth at a bridal show this weekend. I have 4 display cakes to take. 4 sample flavors of cake. My MIL decorates my booth with fabrics and flowers to make it look really nice. I don't like to have any more stuff than that on my 2 tables because my booth gets backed up as it is. There is usually a line waiting to get in.

keflyn Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 9:09pm
post #20 of 26

I do not speak from experience, but probably pictures and basic info, maybe flavors, and your contact info on the last part of the brochure
put the website w/ the contact info as well as unobtrusively center fold bottom.

for the brochure, bright colors are good, just keep it to a minimum no seizure inducing combinations,
DO NOT USE THE FONT "PAPYRUS" everyone's sick of it, a new trend emerging is the use of the font "Zapfino" but remember, catchy font for headlines, simpler text for info, if it takes longer than a second or 2 to decifer, people won't read it. They'll take it, but they may not read it...
remember, the more colors you use, the more it's going to cost you, you can get more bang for your buck by playing with the opacity of a certain color, lots of different shades, same color (if you're having these professionally printed, i assume you are)
Try and draw the eye through the brocure. if it helps, on a blank folded paper, draw a simple path that makes sense from the top of the front to the end of the back and use as a guide for placement

Oh, please i beg you don't use the starburst effect, you don't need it

Or get a graphic designer to help you, we have the software

indydebi Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 9:35pm
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by keflyn

remember, the more colors you use, the more it's going to cost you,



back in the day of "regular" printing, this was true but in today's world of digital everything, that is just not true anymore. I have a marketer in my BNI group and he's constantly fighting this archaic thinking with his clients. No, it's not more expensive and yes they CAN go with the better look that they really want.

If whoever you go with tries to feed you this line, find someone else. I'm serious.

keflyn Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 9:42pm
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by keflyn

remember, the more colors you use, the more it's going to cost you,


back in the day of "regular" printing, this was true but in today's world of digital everything, that is just not true anymore. I have a marketer in my BNI group and he's constantly fighting this archaic thinking with his clients. No, it's not more expensive and yes they CAN go with the better look that they really want.

If whoever you go with tries to feed you this line, find someone else. I'm serious.




ooops......I forgot to mention I was speaking about pantone icon_redface.gif colors.......pantones are true neons, true golds, and true silvers, they are the metallics, and certain shades of other colors that cannot be made with cmyk or rgb. oh how i long for free reign of pantones but that simply cannot be....I don't mean to sound like a know it all and I'm sorry if i'm stepping on anyone's toes, if i get irritating just tell me to shut up and i'll go away

indydebi Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 10:11pm
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by keflyn

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by keflyn

remember, the more colors you use, the more it's going to cost you,


back in the day of "regular" printing, this was true but in today's world of digital everything, that is just not true anymore. I have a marketer in my BNI group and he's constantly fighting this archaic thinking with his clients. No, it's not more expensive and yes they CAN go with the better look that they really want.

If whoever you go with tries to feed you this line, find someone else. I'm serious.



ooops......I forgot to mention I was speaking about pantone icon_redface.gif colors.......pantones are true neons, true golds, and true silvers, they are the metallics, and certain shades of other colors that cannot be made with cmyk or rgb. oh how i long for free reign of pantones but that simply cannot be....I don't mean to sound like a know it all and I'm sorry if i'm stepping on anyone's toes, if i get irritating just tell me to shut up and i'll go away




No apology needed! It's always good to learn new stuff ... even if it's not cake stuff! thumbs_up.gif

tracycakes Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 10:14pm
post #24 of 26

My graphic designer ROCKS and I've never met him! I knew that I couldn't get the professional look I wanted with my brochures myself. We took it to a professional and they did an awesome job with things I could never have thought of myself. We let them 'play' and we got great return out of it.

Yes, I can use publisher and word and excel but I don't the creativity and skills to do what they do. Just like anyone can make a wedding cake but would I trust someone to make a 5 tier wedding cake covered in fondant drapes and gumpaste roses when all they've ever baked is a chocolate cake they left in the pan and iced in storebought icing?

keflyn Posted 5 Jan 2010 , 10:32pm
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tracycakes

\\Yes, I can use publisher and word and excel but I don't the creativity and skills to do what they do. Just like anyone can make a wedding cake but would I trust someone to make a 5 tier wedding cake covered in fondant drapes and gumpaste roses when all they've ever baked is a chocolate cake they left in the pan and iced in storebought icing?




.....oh its a lot more than publisher word and excel, to put it in cake-ish terms, that's a tub of generic icing and dollar tree box mix with someone who's never held a piping bag making it...just a little note here the industry standard programs we use cost anywhere from 1400-1700 dollars. sorry if i offend, just saying, a lot of people don't realize quite what we do. and I am so glad you had a good designer

tracycakes Posted 6 Jan 2010 , 1:23pm
post #26 of 26

keflyn, you didn't offend me, you supported my position. thumbs_up.gif

Everyone makes up their own mind about what they want but I've seen some brochures that were, let's say, less than professional and I knew it wasn't what I wanted to portray about me or my business.

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