Icicle Molds

Decorating By dchockeyguy Updated 24 Dec 2009 , 8:34pm by KatieKake

dchockeyguy Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 3:15pm
post #1 of 9

I need to make some icicles out of Isomalt. I've been searching for an object to use to make a mold which would work. I'd have thought with all the Christmas decorations around, I'd have been able to find one, but I can't. Do you have any suggestions?

Trevor

8 replies
cakeandpartygirl Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 4:06pm
post #2 of 9

I am not sure if there is a mold but this recipe may give you an idea of how to twist the sugar http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Hard-Candy-Peppermint-Twists/Detail.aspx

MYOM-Dominic Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 5:47pm
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchockeyguy

I need to make some icicles out of . I've been searching for an object to use to make a mold which would work. I'd have thought with all the Christmas decorations around, I'd have been able to find one, but I can't. Do you have any suggestions?

Trevor




Hi Trevor,

You are not going to believe how easy your project can be. Make some stiff royal icing with real egg white - not that powdered stuff. Pipe icicles on parchment paper and allow to dry completely. Apply Seal-Dit to seal the royal icing and then apply any of my mold making products. That is it!

Easy Peasy Japoneasy!

Dominic icon_smile.gif

dchockeyguy Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 6:21pm
post #4 of 9

Thanks, Dominic! I dont' think I'd ever have thought to do it THAT way. AWESOME. Now I have another project to try this weekend.

KHalstead Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 6:28pm
post #5 of 9

you know I saw on a chocolate shows one time (few years ago) where they made molds with cornstarch. Would that work with isomalt? You would take an object (in your case if you could find a plastic icicle ornament or someting) and press it into a bed of cornstarch, remove the item and then use the indentation to pour your isomalt in....let it set up and then remove them (you have to remake the molds every time you pour)....I saw on "How it's made" and that's how they make gummy bears and gummy worms too

MYOM-Dominic Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 7:04pm
post #6 of 9

I have never poured Isomalt into an impression made in cornstarch. My first thought would be that the cornstarch would embed itself into the molten Isomalt and the cooled piece would have a powdered looking surface. But you never know how these materials will work together until you actually try it. The method you described is actually very similar to how aluminum and other molten metals are casted. Instead of cornstarch, wet sand is used and the metal parts come out without the sand granules sticking to the surface of the metal. I think this happens because the sand is wet.

Dominic icon_smile.gif

MYOM-Dominic Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 7:07pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchockeyguy

Thanks, Dominic! I dont' think I'd ever have thought to do it THAT way. AWESOME. Now I have another project to try this weekend.




Trevor,

If you try this method, take some pictures. I and everyone else would love to see your handiwork and others can learn from it.

Dominic icon_smile.gif

dchockeyguy Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 7:23pm
post #8 of 9

Sure, thing, Dominic. hopefully it will look better than the LAST thing I showed you I did. Ugh. what a mess THAT was. But it gave you a good laugh!

KatieKake Posted 24 Dec 2009 , 8:34pm
post #9 of 9

They make Jelly Belly's in corn starch molds, they have a huge tray of corn starch, and the jelly is poured into the impressions, then they go on from there with several more steps to get the finished Jelly Belly. In case no one knows, they call the imperfect Jelly Bellys, Belly Flops. I just love that, it makes me smile when ever I think of it.

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