Two Questions On Brush Embroidery ...

Decorating By emiyeric Updated 23 Dec 2009 , 1:53am by Jeep_girl816

emiyeric Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 8:56pm
post #1 of 12

So just to clarify:
1.- My icing should be piped before I brush it, I can't apply with a brush to begin with, correct?
and
2.- What consistency should I be looking for my RI to be? (If the answer to #1 is "yes", though, I may have already answered #2 icon_smile.gif ).

Thanks!

11 replies
metria Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 9:08pm
post #2 of 12

If you want to do it the Wilton way, here are the instructions:

http://www.wilton.com/technique/Brush-embroidery

TexasSugar Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 9:24pm
post #3 of 12

I have only seen it done by piping first then brushing it. You want it to be a consistancy that you can comfortably pipe with out killing your hand.

With Royal icing you will have to pipe in sections and brush it, other wise it will dry super fast and it will not have the pretty brush effect you are wanting.

ninatat Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 9:54pm
post #4 of 12

i've never used royal icing i love doing embroidery, there is a good example on u-tube, if you say use a flower cutter you need to use a thick line of bc maybe #3 because you are going to be pulling your frosting towards the middle, and be sure your brush is wet with alcohol or flavoring, i found some good brushes for this at the dollar store they are way to stiff for my painting, so i cut into brush making frayed or jagged edges, it works great, oh and make sure you bc has crusted

sweetflowers Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 10:11pm
post #5 of 12

Add a small amount of piping gel to your RI so it won't dry as fast and you will be able to brush it. The RI would be a medium consistency, I make a normal firm consistency and then add 1 tsp gel per cup of royal and the consistency should be good. You don't want it so stiff you can't brush it, but not so runny it doesn't keep it shape or the brush strokes melt.

11cupcakes Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 10:32pm
post #6 of 12

Your icing should be good enough to pipe. And you pipe the line and then pull it with the brush.

emiyeric Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 11:47pm
post #7 of 12

Awesome, great guys, thanks! Now, if I don't have piping gel, can I just do a touch of corn syrup?

metria Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 11:49pm
post #8 of 12

probably, but here's a piping gel recipe from doobsd, posted by JanH:

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6998/piping-gel-that-works

emiyeric Posted 22 Dec 2009 , 5:00am
post #9 of 12

Perfect! This actually went really well ... only took me a flower or two to get the hang of it, thanks for the help! I'll post a picture tomorrow when I have natural lighting icon_smile.gif.

emiyeric Posted 22 Dec 2009 , 4:30pm
post #10 of 12

Here's how the flowers turned out. It took me a couple to get going, but once I'd decided on the best brush and the best consistency and tried it a couple of times, it went fairly well. Thanks again, so much, for all your help, guys! icon_smile.gif

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1543374

MarlaQuack Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 12:42am
post #11 of 12

Lovely!

Jeep_girl816 Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 1:53am
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetflowers

Add a small amount of piping gel to your RI so it won't dry as fast and you will be able to brush it. The RI would be a medium consistency, I make a normal firm consistency and then add 1 tsp gel per cup of royal and the consistency should be good. You don't want it so stiff you can't brush it, but not so runny it doesn't keep it shape or the brush strokes melt.


Thanks! Great tip! Falls into the "hey why didn't I think of that before" category. Will definitely being trying next time I make up some royal icon_biggrin.gif

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