kello Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 9:46pm
post #1 of

I don't want to through it out. Is there any hope at all? I needed it to dip p.b. balls in.

thanks

27 replies
tonedna Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 9:56pm
post #2 of

I never had any luck with it, but I will give you a bump.
Edna icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 10:05pm
post #3 of

Add crisco? I'm not sure it'd work, but if you have a little crisco to spare you could try it?

tonedna Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 10:56pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Add crisco? I'm not sure it'd work, but if you have a little crisco to spare you could try it?




That didnt work for me.. icon_sad.gif Plus if you add too much it can make the chocolate very soft and it will not harden the same way.
Edna

kello Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 11:14pm
post #5 of

Thanks ladies. I did try the crisco....just a bit and no luck. Maybe corn syrup? Will it make it worse if I re-heat it? Maybe I will just have to eat it....it's still yummy!

PinkZiab Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 11:26pm
post #6 of

Usually all you can do with seized chocolate is make a ganache (and not the best ganache ever, really).

msulli10 Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 11:34pm
post #7 of

If you make ganache, you can dip the p.b. balls in it, but it might not get really hard - at least you wouldn't be wasting all that chocolate.

kello Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 11:43pm
post #8 of

I will try the ganache then. I'm sure they will be just as yummy. I'll just keep them chilled.

bobwonderbuns Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 11:51pm
post #9 of

Once the chocolate has seized its molecular structure has changed so it will never be good again. You can try to make ganashe or other things with it but you are really better off dumping it and starting fresh. (Go ahead, ask me how I know this...) icon_rolleyes.gif

adonisthegreek1 Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 12:06am

You can add 1 tbsp. of solid shortening or an even smaller amount of paramount crystals. That has worked for me when I accidentally seized my chocolate. A chef once told me that you could add small amount of hot water and stir vigorously. I was totally shocked that he said to add more water. I never tried it, but he swore by it. He said to make sure the water is hot and start adding a tbsp at a time to unseize it. It will not have the shine as tempered chocolate but he suggested using it is great for baking or chocolate sauces.

tonedna Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 12:09am
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Once the chocolate has seized its molecular structure has changed so it will never be good again. You can try to make ganashe or other things with it but you are really better off dumping it and starting fresh. (Go ahead, ask me how I know this...) icon_rolleyes.gif




I know the answer,but..im going to go for it...
HOW DO YOU KNOW THIS???... icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Edna icon_smile.gif

bobwonderbuns Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 12:15am
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Once the chocolate has seized its molecular structure has changed so it will never be good again. You can try to make ganashe or other things with it but you are really better off dumping it and starting fresh. (Go ahead, ask me how I know this...) icon_rolleyes.gif



I know the answer,but..im going to go for it...
HOW DO YOU KNOW THIS???... icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Edna icon_smile.gif




ha ha ha ha ha!! Only you Edna, only you!! icon_lol.gif Well... the answer is... "been there, done that..." icon_redface.gificon_razz.gif

jymorgan Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 12:21am

My sister had this happen when she was melting about 2 pounds of chocolate. We didn't want to waste it so I did some research and found that if you add vegetable oil, a little at a time, you can get the chocolate to come back. She was using it to dip Oreo truffles and it worked!

kello Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 3:17am

jymorgan, I sure hope you're right! I will definitly try it....I'm excited now. I really didn't want to eat all of it. I could never just throw it out....it's chocolate! LOL
Question though, do you have to re-heat it, or just add the oil and start stirring?

bobwonderbuns Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 2:46pm

I used the Wilton melting pot to melt a pound of white chocolate the other day and it not only didn't melt, it turned into a big blob of what can only be described as "it's dead Jim." icon_surprised.gif We tried adding paramount crystals and such but they just sat on top of the blob. icon_confused.gif Needless to say we just pitched it (and from now on we use the "warm" setting to melt the white chocolate.) icon_cool.gif

HowCoolGomo1 Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 3:12pm

I would try adding some cream, just to see if you can get it back. If if doesn't come back add more cream, make ganache or the best hot chocolate on the planet.

If you do get it back, then what you need to do and don't everyone jump on me for this is get paraffin.

Yep that's what I said, wax. You probably won't need a lot. I can't give you measurements.

My childhood; my grandmothers, aunts and mother didn't know how to temper chocolate, so they added paraffin to the chocolate to give crisp, crunch and shiny to the candies.

You can still find it in grocery stores near the canning stuff.

General rule, once seized it's no good. The crystals have formed. You are now in the are of chocolate sauce.

kello Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 9:37pm

LOL, you're too funny bob! I was wondering about getting that Wilton melting pot......good to know!

peg818 Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 9:56pm

If you can't get the chocolate to melt, and it doesn't taste burnt, then chop it up and make cookies with it.

kello Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 9:58pm

ooohh, sounds yummy! Do you mean to add it in like/with choc. chips?

peg818 Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 10:12pm

use it like you chocolate chips

kello Posted 19 Dec 2009 , 10:13pm

I was going to make some tomorrow, I will certainly do that!!! Thanks!

Marianna46 Posted 21 Dec 2009 , 9:12pm

HowCoolGomo, I don't want to be a spoilsport, but what our grandmothers, aunts and mothers didn't know at the time was that paraffin is a carcinogen, so it' s probably not a good idea to use that method, although I can see where it would give great results in that steamy Texas heat (I'm from there, too!).

bettyboop76 Posted 14 Jan 2010 , 6:11pm

I am glad to hear I was not the only one that had issues with the melting pot, I returned mine, I'll stick with my crockpot.

deefour Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 6:44am

Alton on Good Eats showed how to fix seized chocolate tonight(2/9). You have to add more liquid and fat. the formula is probably on the site.

ceshell Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 8:39am

I can't find any info about paraffin being carcinogenic, but this one's an interesting read http://www.ochef.com/674.htm. Of course I have no idea if it's true but it is mind-opening to consider; namely "Do not assume the paraffin for sale (for canning purposes) in your supermarket is food-grade" - good point. I almost picked some up at the mkt but specifically didn't because it did NOT state that it was food grade. Hm.

Meanwhile hope your chocolate worked out! I knew you could try for ganache from seized chocolate but didn't know the other remedies. Good to know; I wouldn't throw it out either!

Mike1394 Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 9:51am

Did it sieze, or did it burn? They are completely different. Siezed can be recovered, burnt no, burnt is burnt. Adonis upthread had the procedure.

Mike

bobwonderbuns Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 1:34pm

It's true, in the old days they used paraffin wax in chocolates. Look at any old fashioned cookbook and you'll see that as a common ingredient. Today however we have paramount crystals which are waxy in texture but are a plant based product (sort of like Crisco). There's also good ole Crisco shortening which does the same thing and if you are daring, veggie oil although you are better off using the Crisco or paramount crystals because of the way they react to the chocolate.

kello Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 1:36pm

It was Seized. It was not burnt.....still tasted really yummy! I couldn't fix it, so I added it my choc. chip cookies and it was so good!

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