How Do You Tell A Friend You Don't Want To Do It?

Decorating By cakelady11215 Updated 18 Dec 2009 , 4:15pm by TexasSugar

cakelady11215 Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 4:08am
post #1 of 18

let me say she's not a close friend, but we volunteer together so i see her once a week.

she wants to order a cake or cupcakes for xmas, but only needs to feed 6 people. with all the effort that goes into the cakes (more so for me b/c i'm slow and i nit-pick), i feel like it wouldn't be worth it for me.

i feel bad charging like $6-$7 a slice b/c she wants something basic, but i know how much effort i put in...and i really wouldn't want to take less than $40.

what do you think? how do i put it nicely, have her understand, and not feel uncomfortable seeing her every week??!!

any suggestions are greatly appreciated!!

thanks icon_smile.gif

17 replies
aundrea Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 4:15am
post #2 of 18

wow thats a tough one. you could say that you have already met your quota for orders during the holidays?

or maybe tell her how much the cake or cupcakes will cost and that might discourage her from ordering.

you dont want to have any odd vibes with her if you see her every week.
btw- looked at your pics.....you do very nice work. i can see why she would want to order from you!

cakelady11215 Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 4:33am
post #3 of 18

telling her i have too many orders already would be a great idea...if we hadn't talked about the flavors, the transport, etc. i gave her estimated pricing for cupcakes and said cakes depend on the design, etc. THEN i found out it's only for 6...

i feel bad discouraging her b/c i really always give people i know a really good price (and have been realizing lately TOO good of a price...) so that actually might make me feel funny if she declines...ugh! i guess that's my only option at this point...unless i want to make $3/hr...lol

thanks very much for the compliments icon_smile.gif

cutthecake Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 4:43am
post #4 of 18

"I'm sorry, but my minimum order is for $XXXX. It's not worth it for me to light the oven for less."

cakelady11215 Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 4:52am
post #5 of 18

cutthecake - that's what i was trying to avoid saying! lol...but i do need to do what is logical so...i guess i will name a price and give her the option.

Bluehue Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 4:54am
post #6 of 18

Exactely what Cutthecake said.

You have to have a min order -

LOL - Someone phoned me and asked for 4 cupcakes as she was having a friend over for afternoon tea.
Thats very nice i mentioned - but my min order is one dozen.
What do you want me to do with the rest - she asked.

I have no idea - but what would you like me to do with the rest of them?

Fair enough i could make them and freeze them - but i refuse to get into that pattten - its is just not worth my time...and i am not filling up my freezer space with bits and pieces.

You would not sound mean or nasty if you explain that your min order is one dozen - its standard practise.



Ohhh, the lady ended up ordering one dozen - it was either that or nothing.

Bluehue.

venuscakes Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 11:28am
post #7 of 18

I agree with all the comments about a minimum order. It is usual to have this and not unreasonable at all.

You need to make decisions about how you want to run your business whether it is huge or suits you to make a few cakes a month.

You have to set the boundaries for what you are prepared to do and then stick with it. Thats not to say that you will be totally inflexible but you have to have some ground rules.

If you do orders that you didn't really want to or feel you were pressured into you will not give it your best.

Hope it wll works out
Amanda

pattycakesnj Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 11:45am
post #8 of 18

I too instituted a minimum price for orders. I got tired of all these small orders. Now no one has even balked when I tell them. That is your best out with her.

TexasSugar Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 3:02pm
post #9 of 18

Bluehue's cupcake post is along the lines of my feelings. If it means you going to waste money on left over product why shouldn't you sent a min to keep that from happening and to make it worth your time.

Just be honest with her. "The smallest cake I bake is XYZ which serves LMN and it will cost ABC."

Then the ball is in her court. She can decide if she wants that cake for that price or not.

If you are totally not interested in doing the cake, even if she wants to pay your price, then just tell her that. "I'm sorry but I just don't have time for a cake order right now."

KitchenKat Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 3:25pm
post #10 of 18

I just posted on facebook, for all my friends to see, that the only goodies I will be baking from now till mid january 2010 is exclusively for family. I've had a couple of friends send out feelers for cake for the end of the year. (Paid orders, of course). I don't accept business orders from Dec 16-Jan 15 but I guess that since they're close friends they're hoping I can accommodate them anyway. Well I can't. I need a break too.

If my posting doesn't head off any requests or orders, I will simply say, "sorry, can't do it."

Edited for clarity

Kitagrl Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 3:37pm
post #11 of 18

The only way I'd do it is if I had an extra round of cake in the freezer, or was already making cupcakes for something else.

Otherwise I'd just say "The smallest cake I make serves 12-15" (or whatever) and then charge your minimum price.

However once in awhile if its someone I know, I will go out of my way to do something stupid like that if I don't feel like saying "no". icon_redface.gif

Mike1394 Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 4:45pm
post #12 of 18

See this is why men go nuts. Hmmmmmm HOW ABOUT THE TRUTH. If your going to lie to her about it then who the heck cares whether, or not she's offended.

Mike

costumeczar Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 5:56pm
post #13 of 18

I'm not a man, but I agree with Mike. Just tell her that it's not worth it to you in terms of your profit/time/energy to do an order that small. Then maybe institute a minimum size for future orders.

JustToEatCake Posted 17 Dec 2009 , 6:09pm
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

See this is why men go nuts. Hmmmmmm HOW ABOUT THE TRUTH. If your going to lie to her about it then who the heck cares whether, or not she's offended.

Mike



Haha men lie all the time BUT just not about the same things. They are lying because they feel bad about telling someone, no. Men don't usually have that problem (it's why men are usually better at haggling they don't take it personal). You see this poster feels if she tells her "no" that her sorta friend will take it personal..women can be like that, you know we can all (some) be emotional and stuff..lol...Not all of us but some of us. I personally would go the honest route because being a woman she should be able to understand that serving for 4 or 6 just isn't worth it.

"Although I'd like to do this for you baking 6 cupcakes or a serving for 6 just isn't feasible cost/work wise because I don't keep them frozen ready to go like Walmart does, I have to bake a whole recipe, but I'd be more than happy if you want 12"

See I think as a consumer (I'm not a seller) that most people think that probably have so many orders that you must just have some on waiting to go. We think everything is drive through (Walmart Bakery) and just waiting for our money. You know walk up to the counter say I want this with that design the person goes in the back a few mins comes out and viola! We have to be reminded that there are still some businesses that don't keep massive amts just ready to hand out and actually do bake/cook fresh although they are rare!

Just my 2cent

cakelady11215 Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 5:18am
post #15 of 18

thank you all for your feedback! well i sent her an email that went like this:

"...I was also thinking about pricing for such a small cake. I don't think I've done such a small one before and I'm not sure how to price it! As I said, I always give people I know a good price but for something this small it's really difficult to do that. Something basic would be about $3-$4/slice but for 6 people that's only $24 which, I hate to say it, really wouldn't be enough for the amount of work involved. Please know that I am very flattered and appreciative that you thought of me to do this cake for you, and I would really like to make something that you love. That being said, if you would still like me to make a cake for you for 6 people it would be $40. I realize this might be more than you were looking to spend, and please feel no obligation to place the order.

And for cupcakes, it's hard to just make 6...I could do a dozen for $35.

Let me say again that I am very appreciative that you want to order from me and please don't feel any obligation.

I'm attaching some ideas, let me know what you decide."

She didn't respond to my email, but I saw her tonight and asked her if she got it. She said she did and that she was going to decline and that maybe she would keep me in mind for her husband's birthday (or something to that effect). I think she said his bday was in April or May, so I guess we'll see! icon_smile.gif

KitchenKat Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 5:45am
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Quote:

Something basic would be about $3-$4/slice but for 6 people that's only $24 which, I hate to say it, really wouldn't be enough for the amount of work involved. Please know that I am very flattered and appreciative that you thought of me to do this cake for you, and I would really like to make something that you love. That being said, if you would still like me to make a cake for you for 6 people it would be $40.




Putting myself in a customer's shoes, sorry but I don't get this. Too many numbers is confusing to me as a customer. I'd rather just read that the cake will be $40, without the preamble. Or if you had said the minimum number of servings will be 10, which is $40, I would have understood it better.

costumeczar Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 11:33am
post #17 of 18

I don't know, I think the numbers part was okay, but it was a little apologetic for me. It apparently got the message across, though, and since it's a friend the tone seemed to work fine.

TexasSugar Posted 18 Dec 2009 , 4:15pm
post #18 of 18

I'm glad you stood up for youself and your time involved. Next time though, keep it short and simple. You do not have to explain how or why you came to the price. The price is your price, that is it. When you start explaining things out, people will often pick up on that and think you aren't comfortable with your prices and try to talk you down.

You stated in the email your cakes go for $3 to $4 a serving, but if she takes this statement "That being said, if you would still like me to make a cake for you for 6 people it would be $40" and does some simple math she can figure out that you are charging her $6.67 a serving, almost double your other prices.

What cake pan makes only 6 servings? A 6in round makes 12 servings of cake. I would have said, "the smallest cake I can make is a 6in round that serves 12 people and the price for it is $36 (using the x3 or $48 using the x4). If you are still interested in me doing the cake I need the following information no later than..." Then ask what flavor, design or what other information you need from her.

Again you don't need to give her an explaination on how you came to the price. But by using the serving size for the pan, even if she needs less servings, you keep the numbers in line.

You may give your friends and family a "good deal" but I would have balked at paying $40 for only 6 sevings myself, and I even understand what a hassle that small of a cake woudl be.

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