Can Fondant Cake Be Chilled / Refrigerated Before Transport?

Decorating By uberathlete Updated 31 Mar 2014 , 4:13pm by CupcakeCali

uberathlete Posted 16 Dec 2009 , 4:52am
post #1 of 9

Hi all. This was mentioned in another thread that chilling a tiered cake before transport would be better. But what if the cake is a covered with fondant (especially colored fondant)? A poster did said that she saw in Cake Boss fondant cakes being refrigerated before being transported. Your thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks.

8 replies
madgeowens Posted 16 Dec 2009 , 5:04am
post #2 of 9

yes it can be chilled

tguegirl Posted 16 Dec 2009 , 5:13am
post #3 of 9

You'll get a lot of different answers. basically, the problem is that fondant *may* get condensation on it from the fridge, causing your fondant color to bleed.

I think it depends on your fridge temp, humidity, etc. My cakes have always been fine, but I've heard horror stories.

You should take a ball of fondant and put it in the fridge to see what happens. An even better experiment would be to cover some cake or buttercream with fondant and see if it gets condensation. Then you'll know for sure.

uberathlete Posted 16 Dec 2009 , 5:22am
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by tguegirl

You'll get a lot of different answers. basically, the problem is that fondant *may* get condensation on it from the fridge, causing your fondant color to bleed.

I think it depends on your fridge temp, humidity, etc. My cakes have always been fine, but I've heard horror stories.

You should take a ball of fondant and put it in the fridge to see what happens. An even better experiment would be to cover some cake or buttercream with fondant and see if it gets condensation. Then you'll know for sure.




I'm wondering if condensation can be prevented or minimized by pointing a fan to the cake. Maybe having air being blown to the cake's surface will help to minimize condensation while getting it to room temp.

__Jamie__ Posted 16 Dec 2009 , 5:35am
post #5 of 9

Yep...fans and air conditioning. The worst thing in the world is to panic, try to wipe it away, or blot the moisture up. It goes away, just need to be patient.

Lee15 Posted 16 Dec 2009 , 1:15pm
post #6 of 9

Put your cake in a box then place it in a heavy bag - moving bags from the moving companies work great. Then put it in the refrigerator - no condensation. Condensation builds from the amount of moisture in your refrigerator. Thus, if you have foods in your refrigerator that attracts moisture (such as lettuce, breads, etc), you will have more condensation in your refrigerator.

CakeMommyTX Posted 16 Dec 2009 , 4:34pm
post #7 of 9

I chill all my cakes for transport and never a problem.
We do have some serious humidity here so they get condensation but it goes away and does'nt leave a mark as long as the cake is'nt touched while it's wet.
Also I think it is safer to transport a chilled cake, all the icing and what not is hard and more stable, not warm a squishy.

Sil88F Posted 26 Sep 2010 , 9:34am
post #8 of 9

Hi I would love to know if I have a fresh filled cake (eg; strawberrys and cream) covered and decorated in fondant, it will need to be refridgerated....But fondant shouldn't be refridgerated, especially a 3D cake......Any ideas on what I should do.......

CupcakeCali Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 4:13pm
post #9 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lee15 

Put your cake in a box then place it in a heavy bag - moving bags from the moving companies work great. Then put it in the refrigerator - no condensation. Condensation builds from the amount of moisture in your refrigerator. Thus, if you have foods in your refrigerator that attracts moisture (such as lettuce, breads, etc), you will have more condensation in your refrigerator.

I've tried this and I have to confirm that it works great! I tried it on a small cake I made for a family friend before risking it with a big wedding cake and it was perfect!

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