So This Is A Very Basic Question.... But...

Decorating By jenmat Updated 15 Dec 2009 , 1:08pm by Deb_

jenmat Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 2:37am
post #1 of 11

What kind of sifter do you use for your dry ingredients? In my research for transitioning to all-scratch baking, I read that some people just put the ingredients in a baggie and shake. (to me that doesn't sound very accurate) Then I read that there are those that never sift, only stir the dry ingredients with a fork. Must you sift, and if so, what is the best way?

10 replies
kel58 Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 2:49am
post #2 of 11

I usually just stir with a fork. Shaking would work too. I dont see why you would absolutly have to sift as long as you stir well. Hopefully some of these amazing scratch bakers have give you some more insite.

conb Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 2:50am
post #3 of 11

I only sift my flour and use the old fashion sifter with the crank handle. I just add my powder sugar directly to my kitchen aid. HTH

prterrell Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 2:51am
post #4 of 11

You can put the dry ingred in a bowl and whisk to blend and it is just as effective as a sifter. Sifting is best if you are working with something that could have lumps in it, like powdered sugar.

FromScratch Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 2:52am
post #5 of 11

ALWAYS sift... ALWAYS. Not only to get the lumps out, but sometimes there are things in the dry ingredients that you don't want in your cakes. I weigh my ingredients and just shake them through a fine mesh sieve... easy peasy. icon_biggrin.gif

LaBellaFlor Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 2:54am
post #6 of 11

Fine mesh sieve. It's quicker and easier then any actual sifter that I have ever used.

indydebi Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 2:58am
post #7 of 11

I use a wire mesh strainer (here's a pic of one, labeled "frying strainer" ... scroll down a few pics: http://www.chinesefooddiy.com/tips6_usefultools.htm ) It's WAY faster than any traditional sifter.

I've not heard of shaking in a baggie .. when sifting, you sort out any undesireable "things" that may be in the dry ingredient, be it flour or a whole cake mix. Some CC'ers have reported finding staples and other non-edible "things" when sifting. Shaking it in a bag just wouldn't pull that kind of stuff out.

Deb_ Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 3:02am
post #8 of 11

Sifting your flour is one of the MOST important steps in successful scratch baking.

Some recipes will instruct you to use (for example) 2 cups sifted flour while others will state 2 cups flour sifted.

There is a big difference in these two measurements. When you sift and then measure you will end up with less flour then if you measure and then sift.....sometimes as much as 1/4 cup.

Definitely read the instructions carefully and ALWAYS sift. Stirring or shaking is NOT the same as sifting.

I too use a fine mesh sieve to sift....I also sift my granulated sugar for my cakes too. I agree with Jeanne, you won't believe the hard, rock like things that you'll find after sifting.

jenmat Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 3:12am
post #9 of 11

Thanks for the replies. I am glad I asked. No hard stuff for me!

prterrell Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 7:18am
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkelly

Sifting your flour is one of the MOST important steps in successful scratch baking.

Some recipes will instruct you to use (for example) 2 cups sifted flour while others will state 2 cups flour sifted.

There is a big difference in these two measurements. When you sift and then measure you will end up with less flour then if you measure and then sift.....sometimes as much as 1/4 cup.

Definitely read the instructions carefully and ALWAYS sift. Stirring or shaking is NOT the same as sifting.

I too use a fine mesh sieve to sift....I also sift my granulated sugar for my cakes too. I agree with Jeanne, you won't believe the hard, rock like things that you'll find after sifting.




And this is why volumetric measurements just don't measure up to weighing your ingredients. icon_biggrin.gif

That being said, whilst supposedly whisking will work for blending the dry ingred together, nothing compares to sifting when eliminating undesireables from dry goods!

Deb_ Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 1:08pm
post #11 of 11

Totally agree! It's what finally made me convert all of my recipes a while back and since doing so I get a much more consistent cake every time.

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