Mmf - Its Not White!

Decorating By kakedreamer1212 Updated 15 Dec 2009 , 1:32am by Loucinda

kakedreamer1212 Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 3:59pm
post #1 of 14

I have a large wedding cake to make this weekend and the bride wants it covered in fondant but doesnt really like the taste (not a suprise). I told her I would make a marshmellow fondant so it would taste better.

I've used MMF before for cakes that are colored but not a white cake. I've never used MFF, which is the one that I'm hoping to use but read that it isnt white either, that you should add white color to it.

The cake I'm doing is white with blk scroll work. 6, 8, 12, and 14 inch round. How many recipes of MFF will it take to cover this cake and 2nd question, will adding white color really get this to the bright white that I need it to be and 3rd, since I've never used MFF, will there be any suprises or is it pretty dependable for a first time user?

The color is what concerns me the most. If I cant get it white, I may go ahead with a commercial fondant (yuck).

Thank you for any advice and sorry so long.

13 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 4:07pm
post #2 of 14

As long as there's nothing bright white next to it, the fondant will look white, especially contrasting with the black scrollwork. I use MMF and the longer it is kneaded, the whiter it gets. I've never tried MFF but personally I wouldn't want to be trying something totally new on a wedding cake, unless I had time to practice first.

This is just MMF, nothing added to make it whiter. The top tier was painted with pearl paint but if you look at the bottom tier next to the black silhouette, you can see that black really makes the MMF look white.
Image

cindy531 Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 4:13pm
post #3 of 14

If I cant get it white, I may go ahead with a commercial fondant (yuck).

Satin Ice taste pretty good!

Loucinda Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 4:16pm
post #4 of 14

I use MMF on all of my cakes and they are always white. Here is the last one I did, you can see it is snow white!
LL

HarleyDee Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 4:43pm
post #5 of 14

Yeh, it's not going to be like, tan or anything. Just not stark white, and like Texas_Rose said, as long as it isn't sitting next to anything bright white, you won't know.

kakedreamer1212 Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 7:25pm
post #6 of 14

The trouble I've had with MMF in the past is that it sticks to my counter top reguardless of how much PS I use on the counter top. Someone suggested I use shortening to roll in out on instead of PS. Will this work better?

LaBellaFlor Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 7:59pm
post #7 of 14

Try cornstarch.

Texas_Rose Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 8:41pm
post #8 of 14

Also, go to the fabric store and buy a thick piece of clear vinyl to roll your fondant on. It's cheap and nothing sticks to vinyl.

You can use Crisco but the surface of the fondant doesn't come out as pretty as it does with cornstarch on vinyl.

Loucinda Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 8:46pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Quote:

You can use Crisco but the surface of the fondant doesn't come out as pretty as it does with cornstarch on vinyl.




I disagree! Every fondant cake in my pics has been rolled out on a vinyl mat with shortning. I never have used p/s or cornstarch to roll the fondant that is going on a cake. Perfectly smooth and NO dusty spots. icon_smile.gif

PennyDock Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 9:57pm
post #10 of 14

I've used cornstarch to roll it out with, but you can end up with dust spots....depends on how much you use :O) if it has a very thin coating of crisco on it as it sits over night I find that the consistency is better!
Good luck!! icon_biggrin.gif

kakedreamer1212 Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 10:17pm
post #11 of 14

Are you guys saying, after rolling the fondant out you flip your fondant over and use the back side up on the cake or did I misunderstand? if so, What is the reason for this?

Texas_Rose Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 10:21pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

Quote:
Quote:

You can use Crisco but the surface of the fondant doesn't come out as pretty as it does with cornstarch on vinyl.



I disagree! Every fondant cake in my pics has been rolled out on a vinyl mat with shortning. I never have used p/s or cornstarch to roll the fondant that is going on a cake. Perfectly smooth and NO dusty spots. icon_smile.gif




Okay, I should have said, When I roll fondant with crisco, I get very small wrinkles in the surface, and I don't get the same matte finish I get with cornstarch icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

I don't get dusty spots either, I put the cornstarch on with a pastry brush and use a very small amount.

I don't flip the fondant over the cake unless I'm having a bad fondant day...the kind of day where it wants to fall apart when I pick it up. Otherwise, the top surface of the fondant is usually prettier than the bottom so I don't like to flip it over.

__Jamie__ Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 10:34pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakedreamer1212

I have a large wedding cake to make this weekend and the bride wants it covered in fondant but doesnt really like the taste (not a suprise). I told her I would make a marshmellow fondant so it would taste better.

I've used MMF before for cakes that are colored but not a white cake. I've never used MFF, which is the one that I'm hoping to use but read that it isnt white either, that you should add white color to it.

The cake I'm doing is white with blk scroll work. 6, 8, 12, and 14 inch round. How many recipes of MFF will it take to cover this cake and 2nd question, will adding white color really get this to the bright white that I need it to be and 3rd, since I've never used MFF, will there be any suprises or is it pretty dependable for a first time user?

The color is what concerns me the most. If I cant get it white, I may go ahead with a commercial fondant (yuck).

Thank you for any advice and sorry so long.




Anything is perfectly white if you omit ingredients that have color. Like the vanilla. Since I refuse to put fake vanilla in anything I make, I omit that alltogether. I toss in an extra tablespoon of cream. There. Perfectly perfect white. icon_smile.gif

Loucinda Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 1:32am
post #14 of 14

I roll the fondant on a lightly greased vinyl mat - turning the fondant over once while rolling. (you can lift the mat if you are unsure if it is rolling nicely to see how exactly it looks under there!) I then lift the entire mat and flip it over on to the cake - then peel the mat off. Perfectly smooth fondant each and every time. icon_wink.gif

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