Compliants About Cake Being Too Sweet

Baking By Adevag Updated 13 Dec 2009 , 7:01pm by Mike1394

Adevag Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:26pm
post #1 of 12

yes, this is the complaint have have gotten by the last FOUR people that have tasted my cakes. I don't sell cakes but I am working on recipes. This vanilla cake recipe is the one that I am so happy with so I don't want to believe that it could be something that I need to change with it again.

Personally I love this cake so I am wondering if the problem could be the butter cream? I know it is hard for anyone to give advice when you can't taste the cake. Will the cake change in its texture if I use less sugar?

I am also wondering if I could use something else besides the simple syrup to brush the cakes with that is no sweet but still provides moisture. I can't do SMBC because we don't eat dairy in our family, but I am wondering if I could use less ps in regular butter cream? Will it cause problems?

My husband's friend at work loves sweets so my husband asked me if I could make a cake for him. I made the vanilla cake I like with an egg nog butter cream. Two people at work tasted the cake (it was small) and they both said it was too sweet.

Sorry I am being so long about this.

11 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:32pm
post #2 of 12

Simple syrup, powdered sugar....no wonder! I would at least lose the syrup, if not the PS, but you said you can't do meringue. If your cakes are dry, that's another issue. You shouldn't be covering it up with syrup. If that's what you're doing.

Spuddysmom Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:35pm
post #3 of 12

It's the syrup.

FromScratch Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:57pm
post #4 of 12

I agree... lose the syrup. Your cake should be moist without it. If it's dry then you need to address that issue. I never use syrups on my cakes unless I am adding liquor to a cake.

Have you thought of trying a meringue MC using high ratio shortening in place of the butter? I know that some people do this. With enough vanilla it might be pretty decent, but I've never tried it. Just another thought. icon_smile.gif

Mike1394 Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 4:10pm
post #5 of 12

When testing cake recipes don't frost them. Your cake should be able to stand on it's own. The frosting is there to compliment the cake, not the other way around.

Mike

bobwonderbuns Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 4:15pm
post #6 of 12

I had that same complaint when I first started. I tweeked my recipes to include less sugar and more flavorings and added a touch of popcorn salt to my frostings and now I get nothing but compliments. icon_biggrin.gif

Adevag Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 5:17pm
post #7 of 12

thank you so much for the advice. The cake is very moist on its own and this is a cake I love eating without any frosting but that is before I have added the syrup. I will definitely take out the syrup. I thought everyone brushed their cakes with simple syrup but it's good to know I don't have to. Thanks again.

indydebi Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 6:16pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

I thought everyone brushed their cakes with simple syrup but it's good to know I don't have to. Thanks again.




First, it's just not true that "everyone" does it. Second, it's a common thing for folks to do things "just because" everyone has always done it (or SAYS it's always done).

Why. Always ask why. If you don't know WHY you're doing it, then you aren't really learning. You're just drinking the Kool-Aid.

Sis tells the story of when she was 9 and we were at Aunt's house for dinner. Aunt gave sis the job of tearing up the lettuce for salad. Sis starts throwing outer lettuce leaves away willy nilly. Aunt stops her, "Whoa! Whoa! What are you doing?" Sis is confused and said, "Mom always said to throw away the outer leaves." Aunt had to explain the REASON we tear off outer leaves is to get rid of the leaves that have browned and are not good for eating. Sis never knew that. All she knew was "tear off the outer leaves". Since she didn't know WHY she was tearing them off, then she didn't know when to STOP tearing them off.

You may remember the story of "always cut the end of the ham off before baking" and one daughter asked why. When the only answer she got was "Gramma alwasy said to", she researched and found out that gramma's ham baking pan was always too small for the ham ... so gramma cut off the end to make the ham fit in the pan. Had nothing to do with cooking or the recipe. But no one passed the "WHY" on.

It's also why my responses tend to be a little long. I try not to share just WHAT you should do or what works for me, but also WHY it should be done or WHY it works for me.

YOu can't make good decisions without full and accurate information so you can decide what works best for you. Always ask why. Always. It's part of the learning process. thumbs_up.gif

Toptier Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 6:27pm
post #9 of 12

You might also look at the ratio of icing to cake, ie. if you have a really thick layer of icing or filling that can make it super sweet. What are you filling the cake with?

Adevag Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 6:37pm
post #10 of 12

Indydebi, you are absolutely right. To always ask why is EXACTLY what I always say about life in general and here I go and fall into the "I'm doing it because every one else is" anyway. Thanks for reminding me.
Toptier, the latest cake I made I intentionally put a thin layer of butter cream because of the other two past complaints about the sweetness. I thought I had put too much butter cream and that a thin layer would solve the issue, but to my surprise my husband reported the same comments still.

indydebi Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 6:40pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

Indydebi, you are absolutely right. To always ask why is EXACTLY what I always say about life in general and here I go and fall into the "I'm doing it because every one else is" anyway. Thanks for reminding me.




Oh, I'm the worst one about taking my own advice, too! I always tell folks, "I'm much better at telling people what to do than I am at actually DOING it!" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

The cobbler's kids have no shoes, the lawyer dies without a will, and the banker can't handle his own personal finances right.

At least we're not alone! icon_biggrin.gif

Mike1394 Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 7:01pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

thank you so much for the advice. The cake is very moist on its own and this is a cake I love eating without any frosting but that is before I have added the syrup. I will definitely take out the syrup. I thought everyone brushed their cakes with simple syrup but it's good to know I don't have to. Thanks again.




All my cakes are scratch. The only time I use a simple syrup is when I want a base for a cocktail. icon_biggrin.gif

Mike

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