Difference Between Imbc And Smbc?

Decorating By JustToEatCake Updated 21 Feb 2012 , 4:27am by Gracielicious

JustToEatCake Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 1:27am
post #1 of 57

I know there is a difference in the recipes but what is actually the difference in taste, texture and what about how long it lasts on and off a cake compared to "reg" buttercream?
Thanks

56 replies
Jeep_girl816 Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 1:45am
post #2 of 57

I can't tell you too much about SMBC but IMBC is my personal favorite. I can't sing it's praises enough! Smooth, buttery, light as a feather and not too sweet. Takes colors great and flavors too. It is a bit "involved" to make, usually takes me aroung a half hour to make a batch start to finish but it's sooo worth it. Firms up in the fridge (like butter)but doesn't actually "crust". I wouldn't leave it out too long, basically treat it like butter, ok out for a couple hours but best stored in the fridge. Love it though! Good luck!

JustToEatCake Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 2:06am
post #3 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeep_girl816

I can't tell you too much about SMBC but IMBC is my personal favorite. I can't sing it's praises enough! Smooth, buttery, light as a feather and not too sweet. Takes colors great and flavors too. It is a bit "involved" to make, usually takes me aroung a half hour to make a batch start to finish but it's sooo worth it. Firms up in the fridge (like butter)but doesn't actually "crust". I wouldn't leave it out too long, basically treat it like butter, ok out for a couple hours but best stored in the fridge. Love it though! Good luck!



How is it for flowers and designs? I like the "not so sweet part" for certain family members but storing in the fridge, i'm not sure about. How long does it stay fresh in the fridge?

Jeep_girl816 Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 4:33am
post #4 of 57

It's been fine for flowers and writing, it it starts getting soft while I'm piping (hot hands)I just put it back in the fridge for a few. I don't know how long it'll keep, I've left it in a covered Tupperware-ish(zip lock brand) storage containers for a couple weeks and it's been fine, just take out to come to room temp, rewhip and there you go. If I need something really stiff though or for something intricate I just go with royal icing for that part. Hths!!

dsilbern Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 4:48am
post #5 of 57

I had this same question so I made SMBC, IMBC, FBC and ABC to do a side by side comparison. And I took some pics as well.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-650115-.html

prterrell Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 4:54am
post #6 of 57

IMBC and SMBC are pretty much the same other than the preparation method.

They are both shelf stable (do NOT require refrigeration). The cake will be eaten long before the frosting begins to spoil. Actually, the cake itself is more likely to go stale before the icing spoils if you left a cut cake sitting around long enough.

They both work great for piping and for doing flowers. One thing I love about meringue icings is you do not have to adjust the stiffness of them like you do the Wilton/American style BC. You can frost the cake and do any piping all with the same "stiffness".

JustToEatCake Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:00am
post #7 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsilbern

I had this same question so I made SMBC, IMBC, FBC and ABC to do a side by side comparison. And I took some pics as well.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-650115-.html



Thanks! Very informative, I can't believe you went through al that. I'm going to ask what might seem like a stupid question but since it doesn't crust once you frost your cake, get it smooth, do your designs, etc. is it sticky? I mean if someone touches it barely does it mess it up?

dsilbern Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:03am
post #8 of 57

I'm ServeSafe certified in food safety. Considering the eggs - the cake would need to be stored in the fridge. If the cake was being eaten the same day, then room temp might be OK.

If it was going to be eaten the same day but left out for more than 4 hours, I'd use pasteurized egg whites to cut down on the bacterial count to start with.

dsilbern Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:05am
post #9 of 57

Yes - it does show every ding and I'm a clumsy bugger! BUT SMBC and IMBC do taste really really goooood.

prterrell Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:09am
post #10 of 57

The eggs are cooked. Plus the sugar inhibits the growth of bacteria. Servesafe might say to refrigerate because on the off-chance of someone not preparing it correctly someone might maybe get sick and then choose to sue. My IMBC iced cakes are still gonna sit on the counter, they're fine.

JustToEatCake Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:20am
post #11 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsilbern

Yes - it does show every ding and I'm a clumsy bugger! BUT SMBC and IMBC do taste really really goooood.



I'm sure it tastes really goood but this might be the dealbreaker for me trying to transport it might be a disaster...icon_sad.gif

prterrell Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:24am
post #12 of 57

I transport IMBC iced cakes all the time. I've even driven 8 hours from GA to NC in JULY with one. As long as it's boxed properly, no problem!

JustToEatCake Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:39am
post #13 of 57

I will try it, does it stay sticky though, like canned frosting? Or does it firm up a bit like merenge <sp> you put on a cake? I know I know I just need to try it icon_smile.gif..I think next week I'll whip some IMBC up...and eat some with a spoon and frost some cupcakes.

It's allowed on my diet, right?

prterrell Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:41am
post #14 of 57

Well, it doesn't crust at all. It does stay soft (like butter), but not sticky per se (I HATE the consistency/texture of canne frosting!). Doesn't firm up. It's not like meringue like on pie at all. It's called meringue buttercream because it starts with a meringue and then you add the butter, which changes it completely. You really do just need to try it, because it's really difficult to describe! icon_biggrin.gif

JustToEatCake Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 5:55am
post #15 of 57

OK I've been reading the recipes and it seems I need a candy thermometer. I'll get one tomorrow. I only have a meat therm..lol

dsilbern Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 4:47pm
post #16 of 57

I agree with prterrell - boxed up right. Everything transports fine. I used the cupcake insert and transported 24 cuppies fine.

These types of buttercreams set up very solid in the fridge and then soften back up when they come up to room temp. (promise this isn't another food safety plug - just a stressed newbie failsafe suggestion). If you're nervous about dinging the layers (like me) put them in the fridge so they are rock hard for transport. If you do, make sure they have plenty of time to come back to room temp. These frostings lose something when they're too cold and not creamy.

And if you like to play with colors - you can put 2 different ones on the cake and when you smooth them out they variagate. So cool. Check out the pic of my Phoenix cake to see what I mean. It was so fun to do.

Mike1394 Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 6:54pm
post #17 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustToEatCake

I know there is a difference in the recipes but what is actually the difference in taste, texture and what about how long it lasts on and off a cake compared to "reg" buttercream?
Thanks




I prefer IMBC to SMBC. I think I is smoother, and less risky to the egg whites to make. Be safe make sure you refrigerate. The book is not closed on whether, or not the whites get cooked in the process. Make sure you use pasterized egg whites. In IMBC I would tend to believe they do NOT fully cook. The sugar cools to fast to have any sustained cooking effect. I take a temp reading after incorporating the egg whites, and it is no where hot enough to cook the whites.

Mike

Jeep_girl816 Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 12:02am
post #18 of 57

I used meringue powder or powdered egg whites just to be on the safe side.

JustToEatCake Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 2:09am
post #19 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustToEatCake

I know there is a difference in the recipes but what is actually the difference in taste, texture and what about how long it lasts on and off a cake compared to "reg" buttercream?
Thanks



I prefer IMBC to SMBC. I think I is smoother, and less risky to the egg whites to make. Be safe make sure you refrigerate. The book is not closed on whether, or not the whites get cooked in the process. Make sure you use pasterized egg whites. In IMBC I would tend to believe they do NOT fully cook. The sugar cools to fast to have any sustained cooking effect. I take a temp reading after incorporating the egg whites, and it is no where hot enough to cook the whites.

Mike



Mike, I've read everywhere that the pasturized egg whites do NOT whip? Is there a certain brand that does? What about powdered? I am a bit worried about my 80 year old dad.

Jeep_girl816 Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 2:42am
post #20 of 57

I use powdered all the time and they whip up greaticon_smile.gif

adonisthegreek1 Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:06am
post #21 of 57

I'm not sure who told you that pasteurized egg whites don't whip, but that is completely false. I use pasteurized whites for Swiss and Italian meringue all the time and they will whip to almost 8x their volume as long as they are warmed correctly.

JustToEatCake Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:08am
post #22 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by adonisthegreek1

I'm not sure who told you that pasteurized egg whites don't whip, but that is completely false. I use pasteurized whites for Swiss and Italian meringue all the time and they will whip to almost 8x their volume as long as they are warmed correctly.



Well I've actually read it all over the web tonite and on the pkg at Walmart (the small carton of egg whites it says it won't whip) what brand do you use?

JustToEatCake Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:11am
post #23 of 57

http://www.post-gazette.com/food/19991209eggwhites2.asp
I think it was no yolks that I looked at.

Mike1394 Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 10:00am
post #24 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustToEatCake

http://www.post-gazette.com/food/19991209eggwhites2.asp
I think it was no yolks that I looked at.




Interesting read, thanks. I just use regular eggs, and separate the yolks. They are still pasterized. I've never had a problem. Now the issue will be if you get some yolk, or any kind of fat in them. Then they won't whip. Room temp eggs will whip faster than cold eggs.

Mike

adonisthegreek1 Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 3:33pm
post #25 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustToEatCake

Quote:
Originally Posted by adonisthegreek1

I'm not sure who told you that pasteurized egg whites don't whip, but that is completely false. I use pasteurized whites for Swiss and Italian meringue all the time and they will whip to almost 8x their volume as long as they are warmed correctly.


Well I've actually read it all over the web tonite and on the pkg at Walmart (the small carton of egg whites it says it won't whip) what brand do you use?




I use GFS (Gordon Food Service). We also use that in our pastry class.

JustToEatCake Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 7:36pm
post #26 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by adonisthegreek1

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustToEatCake

Quote:
Originally Posted by adonisthegreek1

I'm not sure who told you that pasteurized egg whites don't whip, but that is completely false. I use pasteurized whites for Swiss and Italian meringue all the time and they will whip to almost 8x their volume as long as they are warmed correctly.


Well I've actually read it all over the web tonite and on the pkg at Walmart (the small carton of egg whites it says it won't whip) what brand do you use?



I use GFS (Gordon Food Service). We also use that in our pastry class.



We don't have a Gordons (I looked them up and they aren't in my state)...and I'm not sure where to look, I live in North Carolina.

prterrell Posted 13 Dec 2009 , 8:24pm
post #27 of 57

The Just Whites brand of cartoned pasturized egg whites will whip. Make sure you add 1/8 tsp per egg white (or equivalanet measure of the liquid cartoned stuff) BEFORE you start whipping. Also, egg whites (no matter what kind) should ALWAYS be at room temp before you whip them!

JustToEatCake Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 12:19am
post #28 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

The Just Whites brand of cartoned pasturized egg whites will whip. Make sure you add 1/8 tsp per egg white (or equivalanet measure of the liquid cartoned stuff) BEFORE you start whipping. Also, egg whites (no matter what kind) should ALWAYS be at room temp before you whip them!



I'm sorry I don't understand what of 1/8 tsp I should add per egg white?

Elise87 Posted 14 Dec 2009 , 12:45am
post #29 of 57

So i know IMBC doesn't crust but can you do the towel smoothing method on it if you put it in the fridge to firm up a bit and then do it? or doesn't that work?

prterrell Posted 15 Dec 2009 , 1:49am
post #30 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustToEatCake

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

The Just Whites brand of cartoned pasturized egg whites will whip. Make sure you add 1/8 tsp per egg white (or equivalanet measure of the liquid cartoned stuff) BEFORE you start whipping. Also, egg whites (no matter what kind) should ALWAYS be at room temp before you whip them!


I'm sorry I don't understand what of 1/8 tsp I should add per egg white?




Ooops! icon_redface.gif 1/8th tsp cream of tartar per egg white.

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