Scratch Wasc Recipe In Metric Measurements??

Baking By Elise87 Updated 12 Dec 2009 , 1:00am by Elise87

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 7:36am
post #1 of 22

I really need some help, don't know what i did wrong. I tried to convert a scratch WASC recipe on here from imperial to metric measurements with the difference in cup measurements and all but when i made it, it didn't turn out right and didn't cook properly so i think i did something wrong with coverting it, i don't know why i find it so hard icon_confused.gif i think i jsut complicated it trying to figure out the different in measurements for all of the ingredients and who knows what.

So i was jsut wondering is there anyone who has converted a Scratch WASC recipe into metric already that could send it to me or convert it for me, i would be so appreciative.

Or do you think it will work if i jsut left the measurements as they are but just used my metric cups etc even though they hold a tad more it will still turn out fine?

Thanks if anyone can help

21 replies
JanH Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 7:45am
post #2 of 22

One difference that will make a HUGE impact on the recipe is the size of cake mixes in the U.S. and other countries.

Our cake mixes are (on average) 517 grams. If the cake mix is off, the rest of the recipe is doomed. icon_sad.gif

HTH

sugarandslice Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 7:45am
post #3 of 22

Hi Elise, I've converted it to metric and it bakes up fine. I'll get it to you as soon as I can tonight, just gotta get the kids to bed then I'll be on it!!
Emma

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 7:48am
post #4 of 22

Awww man i am so DUMB! (and tired hehe)

I meant SCRATCH WASC icon_rolleyes.gif Had to edit it above to say scratch

It's hard for me to get white cake mix where i am so i have to make it scratch which i prefer anyway

Sorry to confuse icon_redface.gif thanks for the offers and help above though......do u happen to have the scratch version converted sugarandslice?

JanH Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 7:50am
post #5 of 22

Looks like Emma has you covered. thumbs_up.gif

All's well that ends well! icon_biggrin.gif

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 7:58am
post #6 of 22

Sorry Jan, do u know the link to that big popular thread a little while ago about that good scratch WASC recipe?

sugarandslice Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 8:09am
post #7 of 22

Here you go, Elise:
Vanilla (or almond) Sour Cream Cake
Ingredients
5 cups cake flour
3 1/3 cups sugar
2 Tbsp + 1 tsp baking powder
2 tsp salt
2 1/2 c milk (less?)
300g butter
453g sour cream
1 Tbsp vanilla or almond extract
10 egg whites or 5 whole eggs
Instructions
Preheat oven to 180C . Fully line pans. 2x22cm pans

Sift dry ingredients together into mixer bowl.

Add everything but eggs and mix just until combined. Beat on high for 2 minutes, turn down mixer and add egg whites, return to high and beat for another 2 minutes.

Pour into pans and bake for approx 50 min

This recipe makes 10 cups of batter, but can be halved or doubled (if your mixer can handle it).

I now always beat it for as long as the recipe says and let in cool in the tin and I don't get the shrinkage I used to.

Good luck

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 8:12am
post #8 of 22

ah u found it! thanks Emma

Question: So you just use our normal metric cups and tsp/tblsp for the flour and baking powder etc?

sugarandslice Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 8:20am
post #9 of 22

And here's the thread with the discussion:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-654467-finally.html+scratch+wasc+recipe

Sorry Elise, I sent you my 'old' version of my conversion! I found a site which converts cup measures of hundreds of ingredients into grams. So here you go:
500g flour
672g sugar
standard tbsp and tsp measure
I use about 150ml milk

hope that's not confusing. Let me know if it doesn't make sense and I'll type it out properly for you.
Emma

sugarandslice Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 8:22am
post #10 of 22

Oh, and always fully line the tin with non-stick baking paper. I found that just using pan release isn't enough.

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 8:30am
post #11 of 22

that's awesome, thank-u so much!

I'll try it again with that recipe and see if it turns out better icon_smile.gif N yeh i always line my cake pans with baking paper, even non stick ones...i still don't trust them lol

Actually can i bug you once more? Can u just tell me how you got to 500g of flour just to help me in the future because I got confused with the different weights of flours in one American cup, different sites said different things...and is that weigh before sifting the flour or after? Now i hope i havn't confused u! lol

anamado Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 9:21am
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarandslice

Here you go, Elise:
Vanilla (or almond) Sour Cream Cake
Ingredients
5 cups cake flour
3 1/3 cups sugar
2 Tbsp + 1 tsp baking powder
2 tsp salt (...)




Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarandslice

(...) Sorry Elise, I sent you my 'old' version of my conversion! I found a site which converts cup measures of hundreds of ingredients into grams. So here you go:
500g flour
672g sugar
standard tbsp and tsp measure
I use about 150ml milk (...)




Have you tried the recipe with the 500g? Did it work?
I have found on converting charts, that one cup of flour unsifted is 140g. I've used the wilton's measuring cup and I can confirm it.
But also that 1 cup of cake Flour, sifted is 115 g.
Any way, 500g seems a little short to me...
I am very interested in this recipe too, as there are no cake mixes here in Portugal.
And do you think the recipe on that thread uses sifted or unsifted flour?
Thanks!!! icon_smile.gif

sugarandslice Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 9:22am
post #13 of 22

Try these:
http://www.scalesgalore.com/wtconverter.htm
http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/cookingconversions.asp

I can't remember which of these I used.

And it doesn't matter whether you sift before or after weighing; 500g of flour is 500g of flour whether it's sifted or not. Sifting just adds more air (and air weighs nothing) so it takes up more space. That's why it's important when using cup measures but not for weighing. I always sift it into my bowl as it's sitting on the scale.

HTH

sugarandslice Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 9:26am
post #14 of 22

Anamado, I guess like most baking, you've just got to try it and see how it works for you, then start experimenting. 500g works for me but I might try it with more and see how it goes. I'll let you know. icon_biggrin.gif

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 9:59am
post #15 of 22

See i didn't even know ppl weighed sifted flour before i looked at all the conversion things and it just started getting me confused lol And since 1 cup of sifted flour weighs less so i thought maybe you used that.

If 500g works for you emma then i'll give that a try to start off with, if it looks like it needs more then i'll just add more and try it out icon_smile.gif

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 10:53am
post #16 of 22

Just found 2 websites that say 1 US cup of cake flour = 95grams

So i guess according to that 500g sounds about right cose if you decide to use normal flour instead you still have to use the same amount as if it is cake flour, is that right?

JanH Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 11:39am
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarandslice

500g of flour is 500g of flour whether it's sifted or not.




True, but a cup of sifted flour will weigh less than a cup of flour that's sifted because this is a measurement of volume not weight and as you said aerating flour doesn't add any weight but it will increase the volume slightly ... icon_smile.gif

This is especially true if you subscribe to the scoop and drag method of measuring flour with a quick shake to level, instead of aerating the flour and then gently spooning into your measuring cup and scraping the top level with a flat blade.

That's why recipes that give measurements by weight are always more accurate (than measurements by volume) because a ton is always a ton, but a ton of feathers and a ton of bricks will have different volumes.

HTH

anamado Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 4:13pm
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elise87

See i didn't even know ppl weighed sifted flour before i looked at all the conversion things and it just started getting me confused lol And since 1 cup of sifted flour weighs less so i thought maybe you used that.

If 500g works for you emma then i'll give that a try to start off with, if it looks like it needs more then i'll just add more and try it out icon_smile.gif




But if you use the 500g, use only one cup of milk!!!
Read the thread and you'll know why. I have tried that recipe using unsifted flour (which ends up being 700g) and 2 cups of milk were still too much.

sugarandslice Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 10:03pm
post #19 of 22

Definitely Anamado! I think I put that in one of my earlier posts to Elise, the original recipe calls for WAY too much milk.

Elise87 Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 11:37pm
post #20 of 22

yeh i remember reading that about less milk, i did that when i first tried it a little while ago so it wasn't that specific reason, i must have done something else wrong too lol

auzzi Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 12:48am
post #21 of 22

Recipe:

Quote:
Quote:

WHITE ALMOND SOUR CREAM CAKE
2 boxes white cake mix
¼ c oil
2 2/3 c water
8 egg whites
2 ts vanilla
2 ts almond extract
2 c all purpose flour
2 c sugar
1 ½ ts salt
16 oz sour cream




Breaking it down into it's components:

This part of the recipe is how to put a packet white cake mix cake together.. or in this case 2 mixes -

Quote:
Quote:

2 (18.25 ounce) boxes white cake mix
2 2/3 cups water = 640 ml water
8 large egg whites = 8 egg whites
1/4 cup vegetable oil = 60 ml oil




Using two of their 517g cake mixes approximates three of our 340g cake mixes:

Both Greens Traditional Vanilla Cake and Betty Crocker Vanilla Cake are good choices for the mix component. Just add whatever the manufacturer indicates on the boxes.

The extender part of the recipe translates from US -> AU as:

Quote:
Quote:

2 cups all-purpose flour = 1 2/3 cups plain flour AU
2 cups granulated sugar = 1 3/4 cups sugar AU
1 1/2 teaspoons salt = 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons salt [iuse less]
2 teaspoons real vanilla = 2 teaspoons
2 teaspoons almond extract = 2 teaspoons
16 oz sour cream* = 480 ml light sour cream {AU}




Finally US Sour Cream is 18-20% butter fat, ours is 35%-36%. Use light sour cream ..

If you wish to do it from basic ingredients: just add half the extender component to a one of your favourite Australian recipes .. works well ..

Elise87 Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 1:00am
post #22 of 22

thank-u auzzi

Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Both Greens Traditional Vanilla Cake and Betty Crocker Vanilla Cake are good choices for the mix component. Just add whatever the manufacturer indicates on the boxes.




N yes i had previously made another batch of the WASC with the vanilla cake mix you can get over here and it turned out great except i found the vanilla cake mix too overpowering with vanilla and those sorts of box mixes too sweet for me so that's why i am trying to make the scratch one

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%