A Sturdy Modeling Chocolate?

Baking By webshaun Updated 11 Dec 2009 , 5:16am by Sugarflowers

webshaun Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:51am
post #1 of 15

Hi all! I am very new to cake decorating. I have been looking up answers to my question but have not found anything that has worked for me.

I am trying to create modeling chocolate that is very sturdy and pliable. So far, I have almost succeeded with this, but when I roll out the chocolate and attempt to roll it in like a tube, it breaks apart. How can I fix this? Do I add more corn syrup? Please help me!

Thanks,

S.

14 replies
webshaun Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 3:03am
post #2 of 15

Alright, scratch that. I have discovered that my current modeling chocolate (prepared with 200g semi-sweet chocolate and 4tbsp corn syrup) dries waaaay too hard.

So my question now: what is the BEST method for creating a modeling chocolate or fondant that can be rolled out very thin but still maintain its integrity and shape when it is wrapped around small cylindrical fillings? I hope this makes sense...

S.

Sugarflowers Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 4:36am
post #3 of 15

I have a recipe that I call Chocolate Leather: http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6383/chocolate-leather

It has only two ingredients sets up well and is very easy to use. A friend uses equal parts leather and fondant to give it a little more body. I haven't tried it, but she's a fantastic decorator, so I fully support the idea.

HTH

Michele

Icing2009 Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 5:24am
post #4 of 15

I use a bag of choc melts or a reg size bag of milk choc chips and melt them then add a 1/3 cup corn syrup. This has to sit over night and I tried doubling the recipe but it didn't turn out, so try this, you have to keep refrigerating it while working with it or it gets soft. It does real well rolling out. Let me know how it goes!

ljdills Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 5:51am
post #5 of 15

Icing2009 does your recipe dry hard? I am looking for a recipe to use to make figures and deer antlers. Would this work?
Sorry OP did not mean to hijack your post.

Icing2009 Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 6:01am
post #6 of 15

o ya it dries really good. I covered rice crispy treat beer bottles in this chocolate and a now making cows out of it for my sons cow hauling truck and trailer cake. So fun, any ideas on making cows cuz you can't tell the front from the back right now, lol. It gets really soft though when you are molding it so you will have to refrigerate you deer while you are making it. But don't keep it in there for to long or it gets too hard.

webshaun Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 4:48pm
post #7 of 15

Thank you. I'll try it out and see how it goes.

webshaun Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 9:20pm
post #8 of 15

Just another question: in order to make leather bark, can I substitute the almond bark with other chocolates, and can I just melt down marshmallows instead of buying the jars?

Sugarflowers Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 11:01pm
post #9 of 15

You can use good chocolate if you want. I just found that the super cheap bark works really well and tastes like Tootsie Rolls.

Marshmallow cream works much better than regular marshmallows. I had problems with graininess with marshmallows. I have never had a problem with marsmallow cream.

HTH

Michele

autigger57 Posted 10 Dec 2009 , 3:42pm
post #10 of 15

I recently found a recipe where you could actually use candy melts instead of chocolates to cut down on coloring the chocolate. Has anyone tried this? Does it work?

Sugarflowers Posted 10 Dec 2009 , 4:32pm
post #11 of 15

Yes, the colored candy melts work great.

Michele

webshaun Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 4:18am
post #12 of 15

Well, my chocolate leather failed miserably. It actually came out completely crumbly. Admittedly I used regular marshmallows because I wasn't able to find the cream. I'll have to try again.

Maybe I should just use fondant and cut in melted chocolate. Any thoughts?

Sugarflowers Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 4:29am
post #13 of 15

Try adding some shortening or glycerin to your crumbly batch. Work on small amounts with small amounts of glycerin (my personal preference). I can't guarantee that thus will work, but it's worth a try.

Michele

madgeowens Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 4:53am
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugarflowers

I have a recipe that I call Chocolate Leather: http://cakecentral.com/recipes/6383/chocolate-leather

It has only two ingredients sets up well and is very easy to use. A friend uses equal parts leather and fondant to give it a little more body. I haven't tried it, but she's a fantastic decorator, so I fully support the idea.

HTH

Michele




she uses equal parts of "leather" and fondant?

Sugarflowers Posted 11 Dec 2009 , 5:16am
post #15 of 15

Yes. Essentially 4 ounces of chocolate leather and 4 ounces of fondant. The flavor/color of the fondant will affect the color of the mixture.

Michele

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