Stacking Question

Decorating By uberathlete Updated 10 Dec 2009 , 12:42pm by niccicola

uberathlete Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 1:34am
post #1 of 18

Hello all. I'm going to make a 4 tier cake but I'm a bit afraid of the center dowel that goes through all the tiers. Each tier will have a cake board underneath, and from my understanding that last dowel has to be sharpened and then it goes through. Wouldn't it be hard to get it through all the cake boards since they are quite think themselves? What's the best way to go about this? Any suggestions would be great. Thanks!

17 replies
Tiffany29 Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 1:51am
post #2 of 18

I am not an expert. I just made my first 3 tiered cake this weekend. Successfully!!
Yes the center dowel has to be sharpened. Hammer it in and make sure it goes through the bottom board as well or it will be useless.

Good luck! HTH!

dsilbern Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 1:55am
post #3 of 18

I thought the same thing when I did this the first time. But I followed the advice I found on these forums and it was surprisingly easy. Sharpen the long dowel and use a hammer to tap it through each of the cardboard rounds. It goes right through easily and works great. I had to move the cake after assembly across the room and it stayed right in place. icon_biggrin.gif

indydebi Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 1:57am
post #4 of 18

I read about the dowel-down-the-center on here for months before I was actually FORCED to try it because of the cake design. I was scared to death, but I'm tellin' ya, it works just like everyone says it does. That sharpened dowel goes thru the cardboards like soft butter! I kept my eyes open and EVERYTHING!! icon_surprised.gif

It's only scary the first time. I promise! thumbs_up.gif

tarheelgirl Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:08am
post #5 of 18

Just hold your breath and push it through!! =)

uberathlete Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:17am
post #6 of 18

Oh wow that's certainly comforting to know icon_biggrin.gif ! About how thick was the center dowel?

indydebi Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:18am
post #7 of 18

I just use the standard wilton dowels that you buy in a pack at the cake supply store or at micheal's. They are 12" long (perfect for a 3-tier cake .... just a little trimming and it's good to go!).

uberathlete Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:25am
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I just use the standard wilton dowels that you buy in a pack at the cake supply store or at micheal's. They are 12" long (perfect for a 3-tier cake .... just a little trimming and it's good to go!).




The cake I'm making will be about 24" in height. icon_biggrin.gif

Any ideas on where I could get a dowel about that long?

prterrell Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:27am
post #9 of 18

Craft store.

indydebi Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:29am
post #10 of 18

If we assume 4" tiers, that's a 6-tier cake that you're going to totally assemble, LIFT AND CARRY? icon_eek.gif THat's a pretty heavy cake. Are you sure you can handle that? If you decidde that's too much weight, you can assemble the bottom 3 tiers then finish assembly at the site. I do most of my cakes as "assemble at site". If the design is such that you do have to assemble the whole thing, be sure you have someone to help you and I'd recommend a rolling cart of some kind. (I have a hand-truck that converts to a flat-bed that works GREAT!)

uberathlete Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:33am
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

If we assume 4" tiers, that's a 6-tier cake that you're going to totally assemble, LIFT AND CARRY? icon_eek.gif THat's a pretty heavy cake. Are you sure you can handle that? If you decidde that's too much weight, you can assemble the bottom 3 tiers then finish assembly at the site. I do most of my cakes as "assemble at site". If the design is such that you do have to assemble the whole thing, be sure you have someone to help you and I'd recommend a rolling cart of some kind. (I have a hand-truck that converts to a flat-bed that works GREAT!)




haha yeah I'm gonna need to pump some iron in the gym before I carry that cake. It does worry me a bit. Actually, each tier is 6 inches in height. Just 4 tiers. It's going to be delivered in January and I'm really hoping that it's not slippery. Someone's going to help me carry it though, so I think it's going to be manageable to carry it in one piece. Hmm ... that cake boss episode where they transport 5 tier cakes with just one guy is seriously misleading haha.

indydebi Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:37am
post #12 of 18

Oh I see where you said it was 4 tiers in the OP. Ooops! Missed that! icon_redface.gif Even still, I'm glad that you have someone helping.

I watched Ace of Cakes once and saw one of the women delivering a cake by herself. She propped it on one knee with one hand while she opened the door by herself. This was NOT a small cake!!!! Now maybe she's more practiced than I am, but I'm on my couch shouting, "NO FREAKIN' WAY!!!" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

uberathlete Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:51am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Oh I see where you said it was 4 tiers in the OP. Ooops! Missed that! icon_redface.gif Even still, I'm glad that you have someone helping.

I watched Ace of Cakes once and saw one of the women delivering a cake by herself. She propped it on one knee with one hand while she opened the door by herself. This was NOT a small cake!!!! Now maybe she's more practiced than I am, but I'm on my couch shouting, "NO FREAKIN' WAY!!!" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif




Haha, wow. I smell a new TV show from FoodTV entitled "Bodybuilding with Cakes" icon_biggrin.gif

Well, thank you everyone for the encouragement and advice. I feel much more confident now of doing this!

FleurDeCake Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 2:59am
post #14 of 18

i'm in complete agreement with the surprising ease of the center dowel rod....works like a charm. As for the transport, we moved my daughters 4 tier and extremely heavy wedding cake by putting it on a 3' X 2' pice of plywood. this made it much easier to handle and support while transporting it.

indydebi Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 3:11am
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by uberathlete

Haha, wow. I smell a new TV show from FoodTV entitled "Bodybuilding with Cakes" icon_biggrin.gif



That's why I am always telling my 17 yr old, "no, I DON'T have to join a gym!" Here I am, hauling 50 lb bags of sugar/flour from the van to the kitchen; heftin' 25 lb cases of canned vegetables; lifting a 20qt mixer bowl full of icing; carrying 5 tier cakes across a parking lot and thru a hotel to set it up .... and SHE thinks I need to PAY some gym to get a workout! icon_confused.gif

Hubby says I should contact that "dirty jobs" show and have that guy spend a day with me. Hubby's opinion is that "..... your job isn't "dirty" but I dont' think he'd be able to keep up with you!"

FleurDeCake Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 4:55am
post #16 of 18

Amen to that Indybebi... i bet he couldnt keep up with you either icon_biggrin.gif

CakeMommyTX Posted 9 Dec 2009 , 5:44am
post #17 of 18

I don't think I could keep up with indy icon_cry.gif
But I'd try my darndest and pass out doing it thumbs_up.gif

niccicola Posted 10 Dec 2009 , 12:42pm
post #18 of 18

Good idea on calling Mike Rowe to come help!!! Do it, Indy!!

As for carrying a completely assembled 3+ tier cake...Globalsugarart sells cake boxes. They are awesome!! I have the 20"x20 box and it has saved me in the past. There are handles cut out in the top edges of the box to make carrying easy. It's also easy to lift the bottom and carry with 2 people.

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