rhopar33 Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 11:58pm
post #1 of

I am making red velvet cake truffles for an office staff party and I was wondering if it would be better to cover them in melted white chocolate or almond bark?

My past experience w/ melted white choclolate is that it is too sweet. Does anyone have experience w/ almond bark? Is it less sweet?

Thanks!
Rhonda

7 replies
lutie Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 12:07am
post #2 of

There is a definite difference between genuine white chocolate and its imitation. Because of the cocoa butter, white chocolate is not purely white, but more creamy colored.

The imitations are often called white confectionery coating, candy coating, almond bark, etc. The imitations are made from vegetable fat and do not contain any cocoa butter.

ZlatkaT Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 1:38pm
post #3 of

I was wondering too. Is Candy melt (white) consider as white chocolate then? Or it is the same as Almond bark??

lutie Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 2:58pm
post #4 of

Candy Melt is the same as Almond Bark...it is not white chocolate.

rhopar33 Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 3:50pm
post #5 of

Does anyone have any seuggestions for a less sweet candy coating? I was just wondering/hoping that almond bark might be less sweet. the white choc is way too sweet.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Rhonda

leah_s Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 4:00pm
post #6 of

I would use the candy melts or almond bark just for ease of use. Let's face it, its all sweet.

lecrn Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 5:28pm
post #7 of

I would just use the white candy melts or bark as well. I haven't had much luck with dipping in white choc. morsels. No one will be able to tell the difference.

lutie Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 6:23pm
post #8 of

When I looked at the Nestle web site FAQ's, they stated: "you should be aware that white confectioner's coating will be slightly easier to work with as it has been developed to be easy to use. White chocolate can be a little temperamental to work with as it burns and seizes (goes hard and grainy) quite easily.
To make it easier to work with you could add a tablespoon of shortening or vegetable oil per cup of morsels when you are melting them. Make sure that you do not get any water into the chocolate as you are melting and after melting allow it to cool a little before dipping so that the temperature difference between the cold truffle and melted chocolate is not too great."

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