Need Help - Buttercream Consistency For Roses?

Decorating By cloetzu Updated 4 Dec 2009 , 5:33pm by cloetzu

cloetzu Posted 4 Dec 2009 , 1:23pm
post #1 of 6

Hello,

I've watched several youtube videos on making roses and also read the wilton method that is on here at CC but mine just don't look the same or similar. Firstly they have ruffle edges and they don't stand 'tall' they are pretty low. I tried adding cornsyrup and that helped with the ruffles but then the flowers got limper so flatter... I tried adding more sugar but that just got me more ruffles again. I start with a tall mond in the center of the nail but as I add the petals it almost slowly falls but if I make the buttercream stiffer then I can't pipe the petals without making them more ruffly...

What I am looking for is a video that shows the consistency of the butter cream as the person is making the rose. What I mean is once you add teh base of the rose to the nail and then wave the nail around a bit how much or little does the cream move. if you tilt the nail how much or little does the buttercream droop or slide.... how do you find that balance of cornsyrup and sugar? I hadn't used cornsyrup in the past but tried it after reading the suggestion here.... Is there such a video out there anywhere????

What I need to figure out is how to make roses like the one pictured in the wilton method here on CC. the petals are clearly defined, stand up tall and have no ruffles. plus they almost seem 'thicker' then mine at the tips??? I used tip 104 and also tried a larger one but didn't get the the wilton look. What's the secret??? What am i missing or doing wrong??

5 replies
dstbni Posted 4 Dec 2009 , 1:43pm
post #2 of 6

One thing you might want to try is widening the narrow end of your tip a little bit. I know that helped me with the ruffly edges. It also helped me to use a bit more pressure and go faster. The icing consistency should be pretty stiff in order to stand up, so hopefully those tips will help you get the rose you want. HTH

TexasSugar Posted 4 Dec 2009 , 3:30pm
post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstbni

... I know that helped me with the ruffly edges. It also helped me to use a bit more pressure and go faster. ...




Other than consistancy the above is the best advice when it comes to ruffled edges. Often times we are scared to really squeeze the back, or are still working on the hand strenght to do it. If you are not squeezing hard enough and turning your nail slowly you are pulling and stretching that icing. Along with the ruffles at the time, do you notice cracks at the bottom of the petals too?

The best way I have found to show my students the best consistancy for roses is to feel the icing. Take a small amount of your stiff icing and roll it in a ball. If your icing does not stick to your fingers when you press against the ball it is too dry, not too stiff. Adding things like water (and in my opinion corn syrup) does not fix the dryness it only make is a softer icing. If it is too dry, doesn't stick to you, then you want to add crisco or piping gel. Both will make it more creamy without thining it down where it won't hold shape. I add about a tablespoon of Crisco or a teaspoon of piping gel to a cup of icing. You don't have to measure them as it isn't an exact science.

What you are looking for when you do the finger test is icing that is tacky. It will slightly stick to your finger but won't stick so much that you have icing stuck to your figure. If the icing feels tacky where it will stick to you, then it will stick to its self when you are piping. If it majorly stucks to you then it is too soft and usually won't hold shape for you.

Justforfun751 Posted 4 Dec 2009 , 3:51pm
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by dstbni

... I know that helped me with the ruffly edges. It also helped me to use a bit more pressure and go faster. ...



Other than consistancy the above is the best advice when it comes to ruffled edges. Often times we are scared to really squeeze the back, or are still working on the hand strenght to do it. If you are not squeezing hard enough and turning your nail slowly you are pulling and stretching that icing. Along with the ruffles at the time, do you notice cracks at the bottom of the petals too?

The best way I have found to show my students the best consistancy for roses is to feel the icing. Take a small amount of your stiff icing and roll it in a ball. If your icing does not stick to your fingers when you press against the ball it is too dry, not too stiff. Adding things like water (and in my opinion corn syrup) does not fix the dryness it only make is a softer icing. If it is too dry, doesn't stick to you, then you want to add crisco or piping gel. Both will make it more creamy without thining it down where it won't hold shape. I add about a tablespoon of Crisco or a teaspoon of piping gel to a cup of icing. You don't have to measure them as it isn't an exact science.

What you are looking for when you do the finger test is icing that is tacky. It will slightly stick to your finger but won't stick so much that you have icing stuck to your figure. If the icing feels tacky where it will stick to you, then it will stick to its self when you are piping. If it majorly stucks to you then it is too soft and usually won't hold shape for you.


Texas Sugar, thank you for the "feeling" consistancy idea! What an easy way to explain it!

TexasSugar Posted 4 Dec 2009 , 4:31pm
post #5 of 6

I've been teaching Wilton classes for over 5 years now. I've learned that I can stir icing and tell them what consistancy it is, and if it is too stiff, err I mean too dry. But I needed a way to show my students how to do that when they are home and I'm not there to check it for them.

I hope it helps you.

cloetzu Posted 4 Dec 2009 , 5:33pm
post #6 of 6

Thanks TexasSugar! I will try your test and your adjustement method. I had decided to sign up for the wilton class #1 just so that I could learn or figure out the consistency issue but all classes in my area full until February! Once the sign up list goes up they fill within an hour or two... and they only way you know when the sign up list is going up is to go into Micheals and look on their board which they sometimes don't update until the day before.... not a good system in my mind.

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