Has Anyone Crumb Coated In Ganache Before Fondant?

Decorating By erilay Updated 5 Feb 2010 , 6:44am by Anita8

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:01pm
post #1 of 48

DO you think crumb coating is better in butter cream or ganache? I want it to look as smooth as possible. I got the tip from someone on here and just wondering what the general consensus was.
Thanks,

She said to spread on the ganache like peanut butter

47 replies
DeeDelightful Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:25pm
post #2 of 48

I actually saw it on Sugarshack's buttercream DVD. She said it makes a smoother finish under your fondant and is becoming her preferred way to apply fondant. With Buttercream or ganache, any bumps left during the smoothing process will be visible through the fondant. She did mention that it takes much longer between ganache crumb coat and applying fondant for the ganache to set correctly. If time is an issue, i'd suggest a good crusting buttercream that you can smooth really well. On the video, she made it look extremely easy and turned out flawless with the ganache.

MrsNancyB1 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:37pm
post #3 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeeDelightful

On the video, she made it look extremely easy and turned out flawless with the ganache.




Sugarshack is a star who makes everything look easy on her videos. I want to be just like Sugarshack when I grow up! icon_lol.gif

DeeDelightful Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:49pm
post #4 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsNancyB1

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeeDelightful

On the video, she made it look extremely easy and turned out flawless with the ganache.



Sugarshack is a star who makes everything look easy on her videos. I want to be just like Sugarshack when I grow up! icon_lol.gif




Right! And she reveals a human side, errors can be made, and she allows you to learn from mistakes she's made in the past. I think anything can be done with a little (or a lot of) practice and finding out what works and if you really wanna be bothered with that process or not. If not, move on to the next one.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:53pm
post #5 of 48

Don't know if I should try a new technique now? It sound so perfect and makes a ton of sense. The chocolate holds everything in . NO buldges...that would be awesome.

Thanks,

Has anyone tried it?

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:13pm
post #6 of 48

DOes anyone know if I can use dark chocholate under white fondant??

jenmat Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:13pm
post #7 of 48

I always use ganache. There is a thread on here all about it. Best thing I ever did!

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:16pm
post #8 of 48

thanks so so much...

DeeDelightful Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:18pm
post #9 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by erilay

DOes anyone know if I can use dark chocholate under white fondant??




Sugarshack did use dark chocolate under her white fondant on the video. She was extremely careful to clean up after applying the ganache so it wouldn't get in her fondant. If it's set well enough, it can be done.

jenmat Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:20pm
post #10 of 48

I use either- white chocolate for all vanilla based cakes, dark chocolate for all chocolate cakes (unless specified) makes the fondant taste really yummy too!

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:27pm
post #11 of 48

I only have dark so I am going to try. Scared, but trying.
Thanks

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:29pm
post #12 of 48

I have whitw choc. melts. Is this going to taste good?

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:32pm
post #13 of 48

Ganche = real chocolate. Wilton candy melts? Not so good. Try some good quality chips from the grocery store. Here is a good article about couverture chocolate. http://www.thenibble.com/REVIEWS/main/chocolate/couverture-chocolate.asp

Rylan Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:49pm
post #14 of 48

I agree, I wouldn't use candy melts but I'm sure morsels will work.

As for crumbcoating, I usually don't crumbcoat on regular tiers. I have crumbcoated on a carved cake though because it got really crumbly.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:52pm
post #15 of 48

U don't crumb coat under fondant? Are u talking about for bc?

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:56pm
post #16 of 48

I don't crumbcoat either. It's not necessary if you give it a lot of practice.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:56pm
post #17 of 48

I agre choc. melts yuck... I guess it is dark or the grocery store.
I am running out of time....

THansk for your help.
I need to stop typing and start doing...
Thanks so much.
I am sure I will have a ? or 2 later on thanks a bunch

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:57pm
post #18 of 48

crumb coating for butter cream???
or under fondant?

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:58pm
post #19 of 48

Either one.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:07pm
post #20 of 48

WHat do u put under your fondant?

How does it stick?

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:08pm
post #21 of 48

I had a feeling you thought that meant there wasn't anything under the fondant. Buttercream or ganache is on the cake before the fondant is put on. But no crumbcoat is necessary in any circumstance.

Rylan Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:10pm
post #22 of 48

I don't usually crumbcoat with ganache, I've only done it once on a carved cake because it got really crumbly.

To let the fondant stick, I used to use cornsyrup dilluted in water. But now, I just smear shortening on my ganache just like I am covering a cake dummy.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:14pm
post #23 of 48

I thought that is what u had to meant. I only crumb coat so I guess that would be considered not crumb coating? b/c I am only putting on 1 layer?

DO u do it thin?

aundrea Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:31pm
post #24 of 48

i just did it for the first time this weekend. using gnache under fondant and loved it. it was so easy. and i did crumbcoat my cakes. make the gnache so on smoother.
good luck. i think you are gonna love this new way of applying fondant.

Rylan Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:33pm
post #25 of 48

I usually use one thick coat.

I've done it 1/2 inch thick and also 1/4 inch thick. Of course, the thicker it is, the stronger the shell will be.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:35pm
post #26 of 48

R u talking about the chocolate coat. THe thicker the better?

CAn I use bakers chocolate bar and cut it up?

They had no chips at the store.

Rylan Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:45pm
post #27 of 48

I'm not sure what Baker's chocolate bar is. Are those the huge blocks of chocolate that are usually use commercially?

The only think I personally wouldn't use is almond bark and candy melts.

Nestle's chocolate morsels works well too.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 11:52pm
post #28 of 48

it is a brand - Baker. I comes in a 6 once bar. You use it for baking , but it has sugar in it. U can also use it for frostings I believe.

Rylan Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 12:00am
post #29 of 48

Thanks a lot for the info, now I know.

miamorsweets Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 12:21am
post #30 of 48

I looooove using ganache under fondant, it is foolproof in not having lumps in your fondant. Planet Cake's book is awesome in how to cover the cake in fondant. If you use your cake in ganache up to the edge of your cake circle, then you only need to roll your fondant out to 1/8 in., super thin. That will help you have sharp clean edges.

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