What Is It Like To Be A Wilton Instructor?

Decorating By cookiemom51 Updated 20 Feb 2013 , 11:14pm by Kimcakes915

cookiemom51 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:19am
post #1 of 21

I was in our local Michael's today and they are looking for Wilton instructors. I have always been curious about what this would be like. What do you know about the pay, the hours, the hassle, the rewards? How much freedom do you have to introduce your own ideas?

20 replies
Tellis12 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:26am
post #2 of 21

I'm curious to know the same thing. I'm starting to teach my first class in January.

TexasSugar Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:45am
post #3 of 21

There are several past posts on this subjects so when you get time I'd look back over them.

I've been an WMI at Michaels for 5 and a half years so I'll give you my opinion.

First off, I'll start with your last question... "How much freedom do you have to introduce your own ideas?" The simple answer to this is none. Wilton wants you to teach what is in their book, as it is. Now there are some instructors that do add in something here or there or give tips and hints in addition to what is taught, but you don't get to make up your own 'lesson plan'. Wilton very much wants you to teach the Wilton way, that is after all what they are paying you to do as well as what the students are paying for.

The pay is, in my opinion good for a part time job, but I don't count on it to pay the bills. It all depends on how many students you have and how many courses you teach a month. Right now it is $34 for the small class, which is 4-6 students. 7-9 students pays $44 a night. It goes up per student from there up to 15 students. Michaels does have a reduce pay for under 4 students but they encourage you to have atleast for and you have to have manager permission to teach under 4.

You do have to bring a cake and icing to Course 1. Royal icing to Course 2. Fondant in Course 3 and Fondant and Gumpaste in the F/GP class. Most of what you see your instructor use belongs to them and while we do get freebe's now and then, I'd say that 90% of what I use in class is stuff I bought. While Wilton does offer discount rates, you get 40% off anything you order directly from them, and they also have special order forms for fondant and gumpaste at a cheaper rate, it does still add up and you have to take that way from what you make. Along with the 40% off from Wilton, Michaels employess do get a 25% discount. Wilton also gives out incentives and gift certificates for different things as well.

I offer all 4 classes a month but usually only have two make. It depends on your area though, if you are in a large city or small town, who else offers it and so on. It also depends on how supportive the store and manager are to the Wilton classes. I've been lucky to have a good store and a manager that isn't a pain in the butt to deal with. You want to figure atleast 3 hours in store time when you have class. That's 30 mins before for any set up, the 2 hour class, and then 30 mins after for clean up. We also do store demo's every other month or so. These are two hours long and you do get paid for them. Of course the in store time doesn't count what you do outside, such as baking the cake, preping your supplies, and paper work.

I love my job, I love seeing the looks on students faces when they get something, as well as seeing the pictures they bring in to show me. In my opinion though, this is a job you do because you enjoy it, not because the pay is awesome. If you don't love it, then you probably won't be doing it for long.

3GCakes Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:59am
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

There are several past posts on this subjects so when you get time I'd look back over them.

I've been an WMI at Michaels for 5 and a half years so I'll give you my opinion.

First off, I'll start with your last question... "How much freedom do you have to introduce your own ideas?" The simple answer to this is none. Wilton wants you to teach what is in their book, as it is. Now there are some instructors that do add in something here or there or give tips and hints in addition to what is taught, but you don't get to make up your own 'lesson plan'. Wilton very much wants you to teach the Wilton way, that is after all what they are paying you to do as well as what the students are paying for.

The pay is, in my opinion good for a part time job, but I don't count on it to pay the bills. It all depends on how many students you have and how many courses you teach a month. Right now it is $34 for the small class, which is 4-6 students. 7-9 students pays $44 a night. It goes up per student from there up to 15 students. Michaels does have a reduce pay for under 4 students but they encourage you to have atleast for and you have to have manager permission to teach under 4.

You do have to bring a cake and icing to Course 1. Royal icing to Course 2. Fondant in Course 3 and Fondant and Gumpaste in the F/GP class. Most of what you see your instructor use belongs to them and while we do get freebe's now and then, I'd say that 90% of what I use in class is stuff I bought. While Wilton does offer discount rates, you get 40% off anything you order directly from them, and they also have special order forms for fondant and gumpaste at a cheaper rate, it does still add up and you have to take that way from what you make. Along with the 40% off from Wilton, Michaels employess do get a 25% discount. Wilton also gives out incentives and gift certificates for different things as well.

I offer all 4 classes a month but usually only have two make. It depends on your area though, if you are in a large city or small town, who else offers it and so on. It also depends on how supportive the store and manager are to the Wilton classes. I've been lucky to have a good store and a manager that isn't a pain in the butt to deal with. You want to figure atleast 3 hours in store time when you have class. That's 30 mins before for any set up, the 2 hour class, and then 30 mins after for clean up. We also do store demo's every other month or so. These are two hours long and you do get paid for them. Of course the in store time doesn't count what you do outside, such as baking the cake, preping your supplies, and paper work.

I love my job, I love seeing the looks on students faces when they get something, as well as seeing the pictures they bring in to show me. In my opinion though, this is a job you do because you enjoy it, not because the pay is awesome. If you don't love it, then you probably won't be doing it for long.




I totally agree. It's been almost a year since I have been an instuctor. Many people ask me about becoming one, and the first thing I say is..."how much Wilton stuff do you own"...cuz you're going to have to buy a lot. It isn't something for someone who hates Wilton. I happen to love Wilton. I think they are a great company. Their classes depend on people who want to INVEST in the company and the company's REPUTATION and the company's WELFARE.

If you are ready to invest in WILTON, it is for you. If you already own, or are ready to invest in their products, it is for you. If someone only wants to teach their own agenda, or their own technique or use their own ALTERNATIVE products, then it is not for them.

Cakepro Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:47am
post #5 of 21

I've been a Wilton instructor for 12 years and I do it for the sheer enjoyment, not for the pay. I teach 4x a week.

sweetcakes Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:49am
post #6 of 21

ive also been an instructor for 13 years. Before i began teaching i was a quiet shy woman who never dreamed id be able to stand up in front of people and talk. That was my biggest fear, not the decorating but being in front. It has really changed my life. Now im confident and more of a leader then i ever imagined i would be. I really have to thank Wilton for this. The fact that i get paid to teach is a bonus. Everything that was said above is true.
Now I teach at Hobby Lobby so their program is a little differant but in the end it amounts to the same. I like to say all my friends are cake people, actually past cake students and if i think about that its true too. I have no family here and i dont get to meet my kids friends parents so about the only adult conversation i get is with my past/students and here on CC. I also offer 4-5 classes a week, and its my only job, i dont know if i could do it and have a regular paid job too, you'd have to be pretty organized.
If you do become one i highly recommend you join the wmi only message board, to which you will have to pm me for more info on that. Good luck.

Cakepro Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 5:02am
post #7 of 21

You must be Selina! Good to put a name to a CC username. icon_smile.gif

khoudek Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 5:20am
post #8 of 21

I really enjoy it. I get to be with people with the same addiction and am able to talk "cake" to someone without them getting that glazed over look. I do agree that you aren't going to get rich doing it, but it is a way to make a bit of money doing something you love. It is what you make of it. And my store and manager are awesome....very helpful and accomadating to me.

zubia Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 6:26am
post #9 of 21

I've been instructor for almost a year now. I love it . Its 2 hours in the evening that I can talk cake all I want .Money wise not very lucrative but you get enough money to buy your cake toys.

cookiemom51 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:54pm
post #10 of 21

Thanks for all of your input. I think I will give it a try!

TexasSugar Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:02pm
post #11 of 21

Go to Wilton's webiste and fill out their application. icon_smile.gif

GeminiRJ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 6:51pm
post #12 of 21

Something to think about....check into your local community college. I've signed up to teach a couple of cookie decorating classes, and the curriculum is 100% mine. I'll be supplying a lot of "naked" cookies, as there isn't enough time to bake them all in class. I will also be bringing a ton of icing! I'll be paid $90 for a three hour class, with anywhere from 5 to 12 students, and I will be reimbursed for the cost of the ingredients for the cookies, icing, and such. Should be interesting.

11cupcakes Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:41pm
post #13 of 21

how do you apply to teach cake decorating at community college?

GeminiRJ Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 12:25am
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by 11cupcakes

how do you apply to teach cake decorating at community college?




Just call the college and ask to speak to someone in charge of the non-credit classes. Or see if there is information on their website as to who you should contact. I ran into one of the class coordinators for our local college at a dinner last year, and she gave me her email. I had missed signing up for the next session (they plan these a good three to four months in advance), but was able to get signed up for their Spring classes. (It helps to have a unique project that you can pitch to them.)

11cupcakes Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 1:28am
post #15 of 21

Thanks.

sweetcakes Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 5:27am
post #16 of 21

hey there Cakepro, yes thats me. I went to the Dallas AIM recently and met alot of new WMI. We may have met before but i dont know for sure!!

rosiecast Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 9:01pm
post #17 of 21

This is a great thread. I'm supposed to be starting off in January with my first class at Michaels. We'll see how it goes. LOL

tiggy2 Posted 2 Dec 2009 , 12:37am
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiRJ

Something to think about....check into your local community college. I've signed up to teach a couple of cookie decorating classes, and the curriculum is 100% mine. I'll be supplying a lot of "naked" cookies, as there isn't enough time to bake them all in class. I will also be bringing a ton of icing! I'll be paid $90 for a three hour class, with anywhere from 5 to 12 students, and I will be reimbursed for the cost of the ingredients for the cookies, icing, and such. Should be interesting.



Let me know where you will be teaching and when the classes start. Maybe I can get cakesbyjam to go with me.

GeminiRJ Posted 2 Dec 2009 , 1:10pm
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggy2

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiRJ

Something to think about....check into your local community college. I've signed up to teach a couple of cookie decorating classes, and the curriculum is 100% mine. I'll be supplying a lot of "naked" cookies, as there isn't enough time to bake them all in class. I will also be bringing a ton of icing! I'll be paid $90 for a three hour class, with anywhere from 5 to 12 students, and I will be reimbursed for the cost of the ingredients for the cookies, icing, and such. Should be interesting.


Let me know where you will be teaching and when the classes start. Maybe I can get cakesbyjam to go with me.




Will do! It looks like I'll be teaching two classes, each with its own theme. They like the "Wizard of Oz" cookies, so that will be one. The other will be either an animals theme, or a holidays theme. They were going to schedule one at Millard South, the other at Millard North....possibly. Millard South has classes on Mondays, Millard North has classes on Tuesday, and it will be a one session class. If they don't get a minumum of 5 students, the class gets cancelled. So we'll see what happens!

tiggy2 Posted 2 Dec 2009 , 7:02pm
post #20 of 21

Millard north works for me icon_smile.gif

Kimcakes915 Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 11:14pm
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiRJ 

Something to think about....check into your local community college. I've signed up to teach a couple of cookie decorating classes, and the curriculum is 100% mine. I'll be supplying a lot of "naked" cookies, as there isn't enough time to bake them all in class. I will also be bringing a ton of icing! I'll be paid $90 for a three hour class, with anywhere from 5 to 12 students, and I will be reimbursed for the cost of the ingredients for the cookies, icing, and such. Should be interesting.

What previous experience with cookie decorating have you had so that you were able to teach a class? Is there some type of certification or something? This is such a great idea! I'm going to look into the community colleges around me to see if I could do this! Thank you icon_biggrin.gif 

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