Gumpaste

Decorating By Faffy Updated 2 Dec 2009 , 8:20am by Cake4ever

Faffy Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 8:54pm
post #1 of 16

Has anyone tried the gumpaste recipe by Chaptips in the recipe section of CC. Just wondering if I should make my own or just buy it?? I have worked with straight fondant and want to try gumpaste because I have heard that it is easier to work with and more flexible.

15 replies
tonedna Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 9:17pm
post #2 of 16

This is my favorite recipe for gumpaste is based on tylose and is easy to make.
Not expensive, lasts for 6 months and it works wonderfully..



Edna icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 9:23pm
post #3 of 16

..............worked with straight fondant and want to try gumpaste because I have heard that it is easier to work with and more flexible............

Each has it own purpose. GP can be rolled much thinner for making real looking flowers. It dries fast so you have to work fast.

Fondant can be strengthened some by adding Tylose to it. Still can't roll as thin as gp but makes a stronger final flower or decoration.

I prefer Nic Lodge's recipe. Basically it is royal icing w/Tylose added. It also is easy to make, and keeps well; can even be fzn for longer keeping if need be.

Faffy Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 12:58am
post #4 of 16

Is tylose the same as Wilton Gum Tex? And can I add Gum Tex to fondant to make it better or do I have to follow the recipe on the can of Gum tex?

Texas_Rose Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:32am
post #5 of 16

Tylose isn't the same as gum tex. You can add gum tex to fondant though...just sprinkle it over and knead it in until it feels like it's stiffened up a bit.

If you ever need to make white flowers or decorations, tylose comes out much whiter than gumtex, at least in my experience. It doesn't have any scent either.

Faffy Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:58am
post #6 of 16

So what is the benefit of Gum Tex when added to Fondant?

tonedna Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:17am
post #7 of 16

Gum Tex hardens the fondant just ike tylose do, but the quality isn't the same as if you would do Tylose gumpaste. Can be use, but the feel is not the same. Tylose
gumpaste still better.
Edna icon_smile.gif

Faffy Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:59am
post #8 of 16

Thank you for the help. Edna, love your you tube teaching sessions!! You are amazing and have so much good information I have learned so much from you THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!

Cakepro Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:06am
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi


Fondant can be strengthened some by adding Tylose to it. Still can't roll as thin as gp but makes a stronger final flower or decoration.




That is absolutely untrue.

ALL of the flowers I make are either fondant/tylose or 50/50, and I can roll either medium just as paper-thin as I can straight GP.

It depends on the PERSON, not on the medium.

tonedna Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 8:19am
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faffy

Thank you for the help. Edna, love your you tube teaching sessions!! You are amazing and have so much good information I have learned so much from you THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!




Thanks, glad it helped!
Edna icon_smile.gif

Faffy Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 1:56am
post #11 of 16

So, one more question, When you add gumpaste to fondant do you make your fondant first then follow the directions on the Wilton label for Gum Tex (says it is to make gumpaste) and mix them together? It seems kind of confusing.

Cakepro Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 3:08am
post #12 of 16

Gum-Tex and gumpaste are two entirely different things.

Forget the Gum-Tex.

Knead equal parts of fondant and gumpaste together. That's all you have to do! icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 3:35am
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faffy

So, one more question, When you add gumpaste to fondant do you make your fondant first then follow the directions on the Wilton label for Gum Tex (says it is to make gumpaste) and mix them together? It seems kind of confusing.




Wilton Company suggests to add some Gum Tex to the fondant to make it
work like gumpaste. But the quality is not as good. It's workable, but I find that for beginners i'ts easier to learn with a good quality gumpaste.
Usually the frustrations grow faster when they work with gumpaste that
either dries to fast or cracks, etc...

So basically all of them can be worked with experience, but to get the experience you nees to learn to work with them.
Edna icon_smile.gif

Faffy Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 4:47am
post #14 of 16

Thank you everyone for the advise, I really appriciate all the suggestions and input. icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 11:25pm
post #15 of 16

When I 1st started using gp I bought a pouch of powder from Country Kitchen to which one adds water (can't remember if anything else). Yes, it worked. It wasn't until yrs later when I had opportunity to take a class from a gal from the UK that I learned how to make gp and most importantly how it was *suppose* to feel. What a *major* difference from what I had been using!!
It is easy to make your own gp if you have Tylose using Nic Lodge's recipe. Now *That's* gp! icon_smile.gif

Cake4ever Posted 2 Dec 2009 , 8:20am
post #16 of 16

I have been in a sugarpaste class here in England for a year now. I keep signing up every semester at the local college. I have used Nick Lodge's recipe for the past year and also supplemented with a good quality sugarpaste/gumpaste made in England. After some frustration with inconsistent batches and fragile dried flowers, I went on a search for a different recipe.

I recently found a recipe for Scott Clark Wooley, seen here. http://www.cakesbydesign.cc/GumPasteRecipe.html

I am absolutely thrilled with this recipe! It came out almost the same as the good quality British sugarpaste I was using in class and the flowers seem to be stronger once dried. The paste was a bit softer, but I imagine because it is fresh and the store bought paste has preservatives. I keep the made up recipe in the refrigerator in sealed baggies in a container. I will see how long this 2 pound batch lasts.

Now I am happy that I can make my own and still have the same consistency to work with as my instructor and the rest of the ladies who buy their gumpaste as well. I am definitely saving quite a bit of money in the process! I have yet to snap a flower, so it could be the paste or other variables. Either way, I am pleased with it and will not go back to Nick's recipe.

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