Sps Issues, What Caused This To Happen?

Decorating By cheesecakes-galore Updated 1 Dec 2009 , 3:19pm by Mug-a-Bug

cheesecakes-galore Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 7:19pm
post #1 of 33

I have been using the SPS system for my last few cakes and loved it. However, the last cake I used this on the oddest thing happened, and I cannot figure out why or how. I did everything right measuring the pillars and all, but when I was setting up the cake the following day at the venue, I noticed the plates had a suction cup like effect and was being pulled down into the icing on 2 opposing sides (where the pillars were was nice and flat, it was beyond that where the plates were sinking). I tried to pry it up, but it wasn't working. I went ahead and stacked, and it looked alright, but it was a pain trying to get the cake to sit on the plates and look even. Has this ever happened to anyone before? Does anyone have any ideas as to what caused this?

32 replies
leah_s Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 8:03pm
post #2 of 33

Sometimes the plates look - warped - I guess is the best way to describe them. Happened to me yesterday. However, the weight of the cake, even a 6" cake, will cause the plate to straighten back out. Everything still works.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 8:20pm
post #3 of 33

I'm not an expert on the subject, but it sounds like your pillars were too short so the plate was sinking into the icing. Do you have a picture?

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 8:41pm
post #4 of 33

Did you cut the pillars? Please say no, please say no.

cheesecakes-galore Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:02am
post #5 of 33

Yes I did cut the pillars (or I should say my DH did). I always do and this is the first time this happened. And no the pillars were not too short. That part of the plate where the pillars were was fine and level, it was the outside edges of the plate that was being sucked down. I wish I had a picture, but I didn't think about taking one until later.

leah_s Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:16am
post #6 of 33

::cries::

Why did you cut the pillars?

JustToEatCake Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:40am
post #7 of 33

Ok I am a total newbie..please tell me why you can't cut the pillars!

cheesecakes-galore Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:13am
post #8 of 33

They were about 1/4" too tall. I thought that is what you were supposed to do when they are too tall, just like cutting dowel rods and so forth. Why should I not cut the pillars?

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:45am
post #9 of 33

The best thing to do is make sure your layers are 4 inches tall or a wee bit over. It kind of defeats the purpose of the whole system if you have to hack on them. It's not hard to do, takes about one time and you'll have it down. Have a ruler handy. Before you stack, figure out how tall each layer is. Figure out how much filling and final icing coat on the top you want to achieve your 4 inches total.

cheesecakes-galore Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 7:21pm
post #10 of 33

Thanks, that sounds good. However, I do a lot of 3" cakes with no filling for the budget brides. The last one of those was 4 tiers and I did the same with the sps system with cutting the pillars and it worked great. What should I use istead in a case like that? I have given up on the wooden dowels.

leah_s Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 7:30pm
post #11 of 33

I'm always confused by the statement "no filling." Really? There's nothing at all between the layers? Or it's just all cake? like 3" of solid cake? Because anything that's between the layers is filling, even buttercream.

One of the main points with SPS is that you don't have to cut the pillars. They come premeasured and even - no chance to screw up.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 7:31pm
post #12 of 33

What's wrong with cutting them? icon_confused.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 7:32pm
post #13 of 33

Sin, we've been discussing that very point upstream.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 7:56pm
post #14 of 33

Oh thanks, I'll have to check that out.... to busy to CC today icon_smile.gif

dandelion56602 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 7:58pm
post #15 of 33

One thing I've done (b/c I've come up about 1/8" short) is once I stack the tier I go back w/ a piping bag fill in the gap. I use a warmed up spatula to smooth out the icing. I saw it done on a cake show this summer & it has become my savior. Works really well for a borderless cake too

suzie1962 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 8:17pm
post #16 of 33

Upstream there was a discussion that you shouldn't cut the pillars, but there is no mention of WHY you shouldn't cut the pillars. I understand that they come premeasured, but if, for whatever reason your cake isn't 4" tall, is there some reason you shouldn't cut the pillars? This is why I have never used the SPS. My cakes don't always seem to come out the same height.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:15pm
post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

The best thing to do is make sure your layers are 4 inches tall or a wee bit over. It kind of defeats the purpose of the whole system if you have to hack on them. It's not hard to do, takes about one time and you'll have it down. Have a ruler handy. Before you stack, figure out how tall each layer is. Figure out how much filling and final icing coat on the top you want to achieve your 4 inches total.


__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:16pm
post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

It kind of defeats the purpose of the whole system if you have to hack on them.


__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:16pm
post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

One of the main points with SPS is that you don't have to cut the pillars. They come premeasured and even - no chance to screw up.


suzie1962 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:31pm
post #20 of 33

Yeah, I read all of that. There is no WHY. If you are unfortunate enough to not have your finished tier come out to 4", what is the REASON that you can't or should not cut the pillars?

DeeDelightful Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:35pm
post #21 of 33

I believe once you cut them, you run the risk of Human Error. You have removed the certainty that they are straight/level, because you altered them. I would suggest making an icing dam between your layers and filling with enough buttercream/filling to give a little added height and make sure you have plenty of icing on top of the cake to give it some height. If you have space after the pillars are added, pipe more icing to fill in the gaps. If you are going to cut the SPS pillars, you may as well use dowel rods.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:37pm
post #22 of 33

Yeah....to Dee. I mean, I could copy the links to what was said again, but I think it would look like I was being a smartass. Seriously. I'm sorry....I can't think of any other way to say what's been said. Several times.

suzie1962 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:38pm
post #23 of 33

Thank you! I appreciate your DeeDelightful response!! Once explained, it made sense.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:39pm
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

The best thing to do is make sure your layers are 4 inches tall or a wee bit over. It kind of defeats the purpose of the whole system if you have to hack on them. It's not hard to do, takes about one time and you'll have it down. Have a ruler handy. Before you stack, figure out how tall each layer is. Figure out how much filling and final icing coat on the top you want to achieve your 4 inches total.




If you are going to the trouble of investing in this system, perhaps amending your practices and methods to get the full benefit of said system might be appropriate.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 9:40pm
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dandelion56602

One thing I've done (b/c I've come up about 1/8" short) is once I stack the tier I go back w/ a piping bag fill in the gap. I use a warmed up spatula to smooth out the icing. I saw it done on a cake show this summer & it has become my savior. Works really well for a borderless cake too




This as well!

itsacake Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 10:17pm
post #26 of 33

Although I plan to start (attempting) to make most of my tiers four inches tall so I can order the four inch legs and stack without cutting, for the last few years I have purchased the legs that are 9 inches tall and my husband has cut them to size for me. I've never had a problem.

The only reason I plan to change is that in the switch from hobbyist at home to business somewhere else my husband and his power saw will not be around. I don't want to have to take the time to saw by hand, so making the cakes to the correct height will simplify the process.

I usually bow to leah_s and Jamie and their superior knowledge in all things cake, but I do think Bakery Crafts has designed the legs with the lines on them to facilitate cutting--though the plastic is very hard and it can be a pain.

leah_s Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 4:35am
post #27 of 33

The 9" pillars do indeed have scored lines to cut on - at 1/2 inch increments. Measurements other than exactly a half inch and you're on your own, just like with dowels.

Ruth0209 Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 5:10am
post #28 of 33

I'm still wondering about if the 3" cake really doesn't have any filling in it at all... Really none?

all4cake Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 5:19am
post #29 of 33

This system offers pre-cut pillars/supports in a variety of lengths....

http://cakedeco.com/cgi-bin/webc.cgi/st_main.html?p_catid=266&page=1

check out starting at bottom of page three and continuing on to page four...

all4cake Posted 1 Dec 2009 , 5:26am
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0209

I'm still wondering about if the 3" cake really doesn't have any filling in it at all... Really none?




The oldest bakery in my area (100 years +) has always used one solid layer of cake per tier as does one of the most popular decorators in town...she uses one solid layer of pound cake(complete with hole in centers) per tier.

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