Help...how Do I Make A Candle Cake?

Decorating By traceyjade Updated 3 Dec 2009 , 5:00am by juleebug

traceyjade Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 3:35pm
post #1 of 22

I saw some very beautiful cakes that look like pillar candles, how do I do this? I want to try this today...please help icon_biggrin.gif

21 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 6:17pm
post #2 of 22

What size? What diameter? How many do you want to feed? Which part of it do you need help with? Start to finish? The support part? The wick? Really, not being snarky, but what exactly? I usually just study a cake picture and go for it.

dg10148 Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 6:30pm
post #3 of 22

I would like to know too.

traceyjade Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 6:59pm
post #4 of 22

I am making a white chocolate raspberry cake in a jellyroll pan. I have white chocolate cream cheese frosting. I just want to know how to make it realistic so you can't tell its a cake. Do you wrap with a chocolate collar or use fondant. I was thinking of putting in a tea light as well for that wow factor. Any ideas or extra help would be appreciated.
TIA
Tracey

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 7:35pm
post #5 of 22

The way I do things like this, is bake in your normal round pans. You're wanting about a 6 to 8" tall cake right? So figure out how many layers you need to bake. You will want to have a hidden support board and dowels about halfway through this thing, because it will be too much cake and too much height for it to work without support.

A fondant wrap would be great, and you can make a melty wax effect for the edges to hide your seam. That part should be pretty easy to figure out by studying a real candle. A tea light would be cool too....but you know how hot those get. Lit for a few minutes wouldn't be worrisome.

therese379 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:31pm
post #6 of 22

wax for the sides.. what is it.. candy melt????

KHalstead Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:48pm
post #7 of 22

yep, candy melts that match the color of the fondant

Win Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:50pm
post #8 of 22

These cakes are never much larger than 6" in diameter and 6.5" high so I would respectfully disagree that you need support dowels, etc. Two 6"x3" layers, filled is just fine without support. Simply make a small hollow in the center of the top of the cake, cover in fondant as usual making sure to allow a little leeway for smoothing the fondant into the hollowed out area --much the same as any carved cake. Decorate as desired --fall leaves, holly berries, etc. circling the base is always cute. Royal Icing is often used as the drip of the wax, but chocolate would be fine as well and will actually look shiny like the wax. Use caution if you plan to use a real tea light as you must use a barrier between it and the cake. The better choice would be the battery operated variety. HTH

Win Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:59pm
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by traceyjade

I am making a white chocolate raspberry cake in a jellyroll pan. I have white chocolate cream cheese frosting. I just want to know how to make it realistic so you can't tell its a cake. Do you wrap with a chocolate collar or use fondant. I was thinking of putting in a tea light as well for that wow factor. Any ideas or extra help would be appreciated.
TIA
Tracey




Tracey, I missed that you are using a jelly roll pan. Are you using that to cut out your layers? If you are cutting out your layers with a circle cutter, then yes, as jamie stated, you will need some doweling because those layers are thin and will want to slip if you do not put some support in there.

leah_s Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:06pm
post #10 of 22

I got the impression the OP wanted to stand a jelly roll type cake on end. If so, don't.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:10pm
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I got the impression the OP wanted to stand a jelly roll type cake on end. If so, don't.




icon_redface.gif I was thinking that too, but figured no way would someone think that could be done.

HG0265 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:17pm
post #12 of 22

Hi Jamie

I'm sorry if this is going to sound thick but am interested in knowing what you mean by and how you do this:-

"You will want to have a hidden support board and dowels about halfway through this thing, because it will be too much cake and too much height for it to work without support"

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:21pm
post #13 of 22

The average cake (one tier) is about 4 to 4 1/2 inches tall. If you go too far over this, you're adding too much weight, and the cake could squish down on itself. Also, the filling can slip and slide. Think of the Leaning Tower of Pisa for a visual reference. So, I personally would treat this candle cake like two separate cakes, stack with board and dowels/straws/whatever you use, then ice and cover and decorate as normal. No one can tell this is the case of course, because once you've assembled like I described, and iced and smoothed, it will just look like one big single cake. Only you know halfway through that thing is a separation. I hope that made sense. Just peace of mind and security.

HG0265 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:26pm
post #14 of 22

Thank you Jamie

I did a Dr Who Tardis cake, which was about 7"/8" tall. Although I put a dowel in the middle of it, it didn't support it at all and was wonky. Now I understand why.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:28pm
post #15 of 22

Oh wow!! Holy moley, lucky that didn't tip over! Whew!

Win Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:52pm
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I got the impression the OP wanted to stand a jelly roll type cake on end. If so, don't.



icon_redface.gif I was thinking that too, but figured no way would someone think that could be done.




I thought the same and decided (or read between the lines) she surely must mean she was cutting circles from the sheet of cake...

sabally Posted 2 Dec 2009 , 6:05pm
post #17 of 22

I saw a candle cake in the gallery this week. According to the description is 3 layers of 6 inch round, covered in mmf, with sugar glaze on it to look like melted wax. I'm going to try that, but I was thinking of 4 layers of 6 inch, with a board in between each two-layer. That way I will have " 2 cakes", which probably will be enough.

gleep Posted 2 Dec 2009 , 9:20pm
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I got the impression the OP wanted to stand a jelly roll type cake on end. If so, don't.



icon_redface.gif I was thinking that too, but figured no way would someone think that could be done.



I thought the same and decided (or read between the lines) she surely must mean she was cutting circles from the sheet of cake...




Why is that such a shocking idea? I've done it for years with no problems. Just don't cut it longer that six inches. Taller than six inches and it gets wobbly.

__Jamie__ Posted 2 Dec 2009 , 9:55pm
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by gleep

Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I got the impression the OP wanted to stand a jelly roll type cake on end. If so, don't.



icon_redface.gif I was thinking that too, but figured no way would someone think that could be done.



I thought the same and decided (or read between the lines) she surely must mean she was cutting circles from the sheet of cake...



Why is that such a shocking idea? I've done it for years with no problems. Just don't cut it longer that six inches. Taller than six inches and it gets wobbly.




Really? You roll up a jelly cake and stand it on it's end?

sweets2eats Posted 3 Dec 2009 , 4:17am
post #20 of 22

I have actually posted a photo on here a few years ago, that are brown and white pillar candles setting on a plate with chocolate rocks. This cake was jelly roll cakes standing on end. It was a very simple process.

They will not be able to be very tall at all, but they did stand on their own with no dowel rods to support.

Bake the jelly roll cake, frost with a thicker butter cream icing, refrigerate until the icing is firm. while cake is in the refrigerator, melt candy melts and be sure to keep them warm.

Remove cakes from refrig. and cut to desired height/length. Once that is done, start coating candles with the melted chocolate. I placed on waxed paper standing on end while coating. ( do sides first). Finally pour melted candy melts on the top and insert the wick/candle.

Garnish with chocolate rocks,,,, and enjoy! If you have any questions please feel free to message me!

capitts Posted 3 Dec 2009 , 4:34am
post #21 of 22

I don't have any advice to offer, I just wanted to say that is a really neat idea!

juleebug Posted 3 Dec 2009 , 5:00am
post #22 of 22

I wanted to do a small version of this with 3 candle cakes of various sizes to be a centerpiece at a community Christmas dinner for the disadvantaged.

I have heard you can bake cakes in empty food cans. Does anyone have any tips on how to do this, such as what types of cans I should use, how to prep the cans, baking times, etc.? I'm thinking of using a vegetable can, a large pureed pumpkin can and maybe a small soup can...

It has to be edible. After the dinner, I will be giving it to the couple who are organize this every year.

TIA for any advice you can give...

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