Isomalt Jewels

Decorating By mamanancy Updated 7 Dec 2009 , 5:26pm by marzipandoll

mamanancy Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 6:50am
post #1 of 17

Will isomalt jewels become sticky when placed on freshly frosted cookies? The jolly ranchers sure did!

16 replies
backermeister Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 5:26pm
post #2 of 17

I'm afraid so. While isomalt does resist humidity better than sugar(jolly ranchers) if placed directly in contact with something wet like buttercream or wet royal icing it will start to break down. If using royal you may need to wait til it has dried. hth

mamanancy Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 7:56pm
post #3 of 17

I am using corn syrup icing. And if the "jewels" aren't placed while the frosting is wet, how do they stick?

WykdGud Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 8:16pm
post #4 of 17

You can use melted chocolate.

mamanancy Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 9:06pm
post #5 of 17

but isn't that going to be "moist" also? I am making crown shaped cookies for my granddaughter's first birthday and wanted to put candy jewels on them, now I'm not so sure?

WykdGud Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 9:20pm
post #6 of 17

The chocolate doesn't have water in it - it's cocoa butter that makes it "melty" (which is why it solidifies). Sugars (including Isomalt) are hygroscopic and draw water from things, so there's no chance of them leaching water from the chocolate. Besides, the chocolate dries so quickly (you can paint the back of your jewels as a barier to the buttercream and pop them in the freezer for just a few seconds), you really have nothing to worry about.

mamanancy Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 9:40pm
post #7 of 17

Thank you so much! So I make the "jewels", allow them to dry/harden, paint them with chocolate, freeze them a few seconds and place them on the cookies and they will stick? Are you talking about placing them in a still tacky buttercream?

WykdGud Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 10:27pm
post #8 of 17

The chocolate should be a protective barrier against the (still sticky) buttercream, yes. Just make sure that if you push them into the buttercream, you've painted a little chocolate up the sides of the jewels as well.

backermeister Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 11:39pm
post #9 of 17

Keep in mind that when you take a frozen item(even for a few seconds) and bring it into a warmer area like your kitchen what normally occurs is condensation or water formation. This will cause isomalt or sugar to possibly become discolored and sticky. The probability of this outcome is extremely high but I'll keep my fingers crossed for you.

-K8memphis Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 12:04am
post #10 of 17

I would not feed any of these to an infant--not that you said you would but isomalt is not gastric friendly.

You can also make jewels out of the chocolate then paint those with luster dusty stuff--just a thought. But I would not feed that to an infant either. That's just moi.

WykdGud Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:56am
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmoseley

Keep in mind that when you take a frozen item(even for a few seconds) and bring it into a warmer area like your kitchen what normally occurs is condensation or water formation. This will cause or sugar to possibly become discolored and sticky. The probability of this outcome is extremely high but I'll keep my fingers crossed for you.




Putting them in the freezer for a few seconds (just long enough to firm up the chocolate) is not enough time to create any condensation.

mamanancy Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:21am
post #12 of 17

The cookies are NOT for my granddaughter ... they are for the guest (adults and kids).
I made monster truck cookies for her brother's 3rd birthday. I'm sure he will condescend to eat a pink princess crown for his sister (especially if it has candy on it too!) Thanks so much for all the great ideas. I won't let any of the isomalt touch the frosted areas. I've worked with molded chocolate as well and never thought about that possibility. I do have the edible glitter so I may do white chocolate jewels dusted with that. (It's easier on the teeth too icon_smile.gif

MYOM-Dominic Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:03pm
post #13 of 17

Painting the back of your jewels with chocolate is a good idea. If that doesn't work, you might consider doing the same with confectioner's glaze also known as edible lacquer or food lacquer. It is alcohol based and doesn't have any water in it. It is also clear which will allow you to show the color of your cake below it.

Hope This Helps,
Dominic

marzipandoll Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 4:34pm
post #14 of 17

Don't mean to hijack, I have a question too.
I am also making isomalt jewels for a crown cake. I will cut their shape out of the crown (gumpaste) and put them in like puzzle. But my question is, at what point do you color and what is the best coloring to use with isomalt?

MYOM-Dominic Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 5:04pm
post #15 of 17

Hi Marzipandoll,

Once you have cooked Isomalt to 338 degrees F., I suggest that you let it cool down to about 290 degrees and then add your coloring. Temperatures above 300 can denature the pigments in food coloring making the resulting poured pieces much less bright and vibrant. I do not recommend that you add liquid color because you will be introducing water back into the Isomalt which can make your pieces sticky when cooled. Paste Colors work well and has much less water in their formulation. When adding the color at 290, there is enough carry over heat to drive off the little water that is in the paste color. It will bubble when you add it but just stir it in and then hold the Isomalt inj an oven at about 265 degrees for about 10 minutes. You will have bubble free, liquid glass to pour.

Hope This Helps,
Dominic icon_smile.gif

marzipandoll Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 5:25pm
post #16 of 17

Awesome thank you!!!

marzipandoll Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 5:26pm
post #17 of 17

Awesome thank you!!!

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