How To Take Out The Center Dowel Rod? Also Buttercream ??

Decorating By erilay Updated 2 Dec 2009 , 4:32am by snowboarder

erilay Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 10:51pm
post #1 of 43

How do you take out the center dowel rod? Can you wiggle off the top tier and then pull it out. I am trying not to wreck the logo on the top of the cake. If I were to pull it out of the top it would destroy the edible image. Thanks for any help. Also would u normally pull it out thought the top? I am assuming yes.

The butter cream question I had is -
If you are using a butercream that has egg whites or yellows in its base is this ok to use under fondant or will it melt the fondant?
I herd maybe the egg yolk one might be a better choice but am not sure at all. Should I stick to a basic Wilton buttercream?

Thanks in advance. Everyone here is so helpful and generous. I really appreciate everything this site offers.

42 replies
shelly-101 Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 11:09pm
post #2 of 43

sorry i can't help but here is a bump.

leah_s Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 11:29pm
post #3 of 43

If you use SPS then you don't need the center dowel. Problem solved.

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 11:40pm
post #4 of 43

I've never heard of fondant melting due to BC of any kind. It usually melts because of heat. The egg whites/yolks (or powdered meringue) are used to make the BC stiffen as it dries a bit.

confectionsofahousewife Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 11:42pm
post #5 of 43

I usually remove the top tier by pulling it straight up and off the center dowel. Then I pull the dowel out of the bottom tier. Can't answer the egg and fondant question.

kakeladi Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 11:46pm
post #6 of 43

I usually put my center dowel w/a couple of inches sticking out so when it's removed I can hide the hole w/a leaf, flower, or fill in w/b'cream. Since you have a frosting sheet pic on there I guess you will need to try to wiggle the top off.

erilay Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 12:18am
post #7 of 43

Thanks so much. Great advice.
The buttercream thing was concerning me because if it does not crust the fondant will slip around. Also I saw on a cake show that they put a mousse filling in the center of a cake. It was so light that it ate through the fondant almost melting it. You could see the filling through the cake.
I asked a mentor of mine and she said be careful of the egg white buttercream.
I personally don't know but I don't feel like being a test dummy if u know what I mean. LOl
Thanks if anyone else has any butercream help that would be great.

I am going to try and wiggle the top layer off. I hope it works. Have you done that before?

erilay Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 12:20am
post #8 of 43

DO u think it would help to cut my cake board before I put the dowel through? In an x so that it can be pulled out easier. Just a thought.

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 1:14am
post #9 of 43

Several people upstream here told you how they do it, in regards to removing dowel.

No, an x would not be helpful. You want uniform tightness around your dowel.

If something is "eating through the fondant", I don't care what show or what pro it was, they are obviously doing something wrong.

I use a meringue buttercream. I would not try those out just yet, get a little more experience down with what you are doing first.

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 1:17am
post #10 of 43

And if you do it right, you wouldn't be able to "pull it out through the top", because that dowel should be about halfway down into the top cake anyways.

erilay Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 6:49am
post #11 of 43

Thanks

Now I know what a cake snob is.

Don't take me to seriously...

madgeowens Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 7:26am
post #12 of 43

I don't push or pound the dowel any more than to be hidden from the top view....IF it is measured properly it will go all the way down into the bottom tier to the board beneath....it is not necessary to go half way thru the top tier....thats strange ....I pull top tier off dowel rod and then pull it out of the other tiers as well. HTH

Don't stop coming into to cc because some people are rude. icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 2:25pm
post #13 of 43

When I have a 3-tier cake and use a center dowel, the cake is 12" tall (three 4" tall tiers), so my dowel is about 10"-11" long. Sharpen the end of the dowel to a sharp point and when you hammer it thru all three tiers, it will go thru the cardboards like soft butter. Be sure you hammer it down until you feel the pointed end actually penetrate the bottom boards. This helps hold it in place.

The first time I did this, I was petrified I was going to ruin the cake, but it works just like everyone says it does! thumbs_up.gif

Since the end of the dowel is hidden about 2" down into the cake, to remove it, slide the spatula under the top tier and lift it up and off of the dowel. You can easily grab the dowel and pull it out of the cake. You don't have to worry about ruining any design on the cake because you don't have to remove the dowel until it's time to cut the cake anyway.

All of this said, leahs SPS system should be your first choice. I have found out the hard way that a dowel down the center, while it "helps" keep the cake steady, is not a guarentee.

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 3:33pm
post #14 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

I don't push or pound the dowel any more than to be hidden from the top view....IF it is measured properly it will go all the way down into the bottom tier to the board beneath....it is not necessary to go half way thru the top tier....thats strange ....I pull top tier off dowel rod and then pull it out of the other tiers as well. HTH

Don't stop coming into to cc because some people are rude. icon_smile.gif




It's not strange at all, it's exactly how most people do it Madge. In fact, Indy explains it quite well....upstream.

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 3:38pm
post #15 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by erilay

Thanks

Now I know what a cake snob is.

Don't take me to seriously...




icon_lol.gif But seriously....yeah, I was pointing out that since that part of your question was already answered I'd address the other parts. If you wanted to hear "yeah! An x would be awesomely awesome"..you weren't going to from me, because that weakens your support system, and I'd rather not read a thread in a few days from now "CAKE FELL! OMG what HAPPENED?!?!?" Yeah....so, that's that.

And, Cake Snob? Reread it. See the little question mark? This is a snub at a thread awhile back in which we were pondering what exactly defines a cake snob. So, my little box there isn't a declarative statement, it's a question. Have a good one!

But, if you want to call me a cake snob....I won't complain. icon_cool.gif

madgeowens Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 5:13pm
post #16 of 43

Yes Indy that sounds right....but I have success with it down about an inch from the top, maybe I measure exact....I think you explained it for her quite nicely icon_smile.gif

Ruth0209 Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 5:42pm
post #17 of 43

I just tell the cake cutter to cut around it and when they're done cutting the 6" tier to grab the dowel, twist and pull straight up until it's out. I don't think it's too hard to cut that 6" tier while it's still on the cake.

erilay Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 7:40pm
post #18 of 43

If are u asking if u r a cake snob then yes. Question answered.

I read about an x in the Cake Bible I believe. I can not remamber why she did it but it was in there.

Thanks everyone for your help. It is so noice to have a helping community.

__Jamie__ Posted 29 Nov 2009 , 7:46pm
post #19 of 43

You are sooooooo welcome, isn't this place great? icon_biggrin.gif

LaBellaFlor Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:20am
post #20 of 43

Wow. It's starting to really suck helping people on here, cause the get bent out of shape, cause they don't hear what they want.

A Cake Snob...?

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:11am
post #21 of 43

me?

indydebi Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 3:58am
post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0209

I just tell the cake cutter to cut around it and when they're done cutting the 6" tier to grab the dowel, twist and pull straight up until it's out. I don't think it's too hard to cut that 6" tier while it's still on the cake.




Have alternate directions available if they plan to save the top tier and dont' WANT to cut it.

Plus I always suggest that they start by cutting the largest tier first (I totally disassemble the cakes before cutting), then moving to the 2nd largest, etc., because *IF* there is any cake leftover, it will be the smaller, easier to store tiers, instead of a big tier, or worse yet ... a partially cut larger tier.

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:33am
post #23 of 43

Thanks. Makes sence. I have never cut one of my own cakes that I had to transport. If they are just in my home I do not use the dowel in the center.

Great info.

madgeowens Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 6:49am
post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

Wow. It's starting to really suck helping people on here, cause the get bent out of shape, cause they don't hear what they want.

A Cake Snob...?




Maybe let others who want to take the time and be patient to help newbies? Hey that could work icon_wink.gif

LaBellaFlor Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 12:51pm
post #25 of 43

I think some people were being very patient taking their time to explain somthing and then got treated rudely. Maybe we should read what's actually being written instead of calling them rude.

indydebi Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:27pm
post #26 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by erilay

Thanks. Makes sence. I have never cut one of my own cakes that I had to transport. If they are just in my home I do not use the dowel in the center.

Great info.



I always strongly recommend that a cake person cut at least 1 or 2 of their wedding cakes a year. THey can see first hand how their assemble affects the disassembly and cutting of the cake (how hard/easy to remove the center dowel; how to remove the tiers; how too many dowels in the cake can turn a cake to swiss cheese and be a big mess when cutting). It adds to your expertise and credibility when you're telling someone how to cut it, if you've actually cut one! thumbs_up.gif

all4cake Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 1:56pm
post #27 of 43

Would it be possible, to keep from damaging the image, to stake the lower tiers and place the top tier either on site or travel with a bit of icing to secure it? That way, the top tier with the image can be removed and set to the side of the rest of the cake and display the logo nicely throughout the function and only get cut if necessary(similar to indydebi's starting with the larger tier saving the smaller tiers for last idea). Then, cut servings with the dowel still intact until that tier is completely served...dowel fully visible, grip, wiggle, and remove.

Mike1394 Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 2:04pm
post #28 of 43

I want to know where the rude part came in?


I also want to know how fondant slips on IMBC because it doesn't crust?

Mike

Hope that wasn't rude. LOLOL

madgeowens Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 4:56pm
post #29 of 43

I don't doubt for a minute you would not know what comment was rude lol

erilay Posted 30 Nov 2009 , 5:02pm
post #30 of 43

my instructor told me that it could get slippery and u might have to fuss with it too much. She said it might be a mess. I am just listening to advice. I hate to be a test dummy.
Thanks for any other advice.

I love to learn new things before I have to learn it for myself the hard way.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%