"pulled Icing"

Decorating By leah_s Updated 28 Nov 2009 , 1:32am by all4cake

leah_s Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:34am
post #1 of 23

Ever heard of it? I was talking in passing to a woman who said she did wedding cakes "back in the day" and she felt fortunate to have been taught to make and use Pulled Icing. Says it melts in your mouth. She described it as sugar and water (I think on the water) boiled to the thread stage then beat into beaten egg whites. That's it. No butter. It's definitely not IMBC.

New one on me.

22 replies
cownsj Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:44am
post #2 of 23

That's the 2nd new one I've heard about tonight. I'd be more interested in learning more about it.
The other new thread and topping mentioned was rolled buttercream. Guess I'm not learning something new today, but TWO new things. Always good to learn more.

-K8memphis Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:44am
post #3 of 23

A new one on me too--but it sounds really good. Y'know that soft peppermint candy that is more soft & nicely chewy than the crunchy crispy kind -maybe a lighter version of that?

cownsj Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:51am
post #4 of 23

That's the 2nd new one I've heard about tonight. I'd be more interested in learning more about it.
The other new thread and topping mentioned was rolled buttercream. Guess I'm not learning something new today, but TWO new things. Always good to learn more.

JGMB Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:52am
post #5 of 23

Is it something like this? I've made this one many times, as well as a version without the lemon zest. It's delicious!!

6 egg whites
¼ tsp. cream of tartar
1/8 tsp. salt
1 ½ cups sugar
¾ cup water
Zest of 1 lemon

Beat the 6 egg whites, cream of tartar and salt with an electric mixer on medium-high speed in a large bowl to form stiff peaks; set aside. Combine the sugar, water and lemon zest in a medium saucepan. Heat to a boil over medium heat; cook until temperature reaches 240 degrees on a candy thermometer, or until the mixture reaches the soft ball stage. Remove from heat. Carefully add the syrup in a thin stream to the egg whites, beating on medium speed. Beat until firm, 5-6 minutes.

-K8memphis Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:57am
post #6 of 23

So like a 7-minute icing?
How is the 'pulled' part incorporated I wonder?

Leah! You shoulda asked more questions!!!

leah_s Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:19am
post #7 of 23

Yeah, that sounds like 7 minute frosting. It is good. She said that you had to work with it really fast. She was moving past my table at a wedding show and didn't really stop for more than a few seconds of reminiscing.

leah_s Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:20am
post #8 of 23

cownsj, rolled buttercream isn't new, but I personally think it's DISgusting.

PumpkinTart Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:35am
post #9 of 23

I googled pulled icing and this is what I found.

Ingredients:
1 cup solid vegetable shortening
1 cup clear corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon colorless butter flavoring
1 teaspoon colorless vanilla flavoring
1/2 teaspoon popcorn salt (fine grain salt)
7-8 cups (approx. 2lbs.) powdered sugar

Directions:
This recipe should be made with a heavy-duty
mixer. The paddle, not the wire whip,
should be used.

Place the shortening and corn syrup in a
mixing bowl and beat until creamy. Add
flavorings and salt and beat until blended.
Mix in powdered sugar, pouring it in the
bowl over about a 30 second period, and
blend thoroughly, approx. 30 seconds to one
minute after the last bit of sugar is
added. Turn incing onto your work surface
and knead until smooth and well blended.
Store icing in sealed plastic bag then place
bag in airtight container. Icing can be
refigerated for several weeks or frozen for
several months. Let icing come to room
temperature before using.

To test for readiness: Pull the icing
apart. If it stretches when pulled apart
the icing is too soft*. When you are sure
that icing is not too soft, gently stroke a
portion of the icing with the palm of your
hand. If all cracks and marks disappear and
the surface appears shiny, it is ready to
use. If the cracks do not disappear, the
icing is too firm**.

*If the icing is too soft and sticky and
stretches when pulled apart, knead in
additional powdered sugar 1/2 cup at a time.

**If the icing is too firm and cracks and
marks will not disappear, knead in a few
drops of water until the proper consistency
is achieved.

To color the ENTIRE batch of Icing: Mix the
color with the shortening and corn syrup
mixture BEFORE adding the powdered sugar.

To color samll portions of Icing: Mix the
color to the center of a ball of icing.
Knead the color in until well blended. If
the color softens the icing, knead in more
powdered sugar.

To cover a cake you use the same method as
if using rolled fondant.

cabecakes Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 4:05am
post #10 of 23

Thank you mseif. I think I'll give that one a try sometime.

-K8memphis Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 1:39pm
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mseif

I googled pulled icing and this is what I found.




Oh google-- great idea --but this sounds like rolled buttercream?

Gosh now I want some of that peppermint candy--I used to make myself sick on that stuff.

A candy covered cake--hmmm...

icer101 Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 1:59pm
post #12 of 23

i do believe this is the same as rolled buttercream.. same ingredients..???

leah_s Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:58pm
post #13 of 23

Yes, that's Rolled Buttercreme. Maybe the term has changed over the years.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:13pm
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Ever heard of it? I was talking in passing to a woman who said she did wedding cakes "back in the day" and she felt fortunate to have been taught to make and use Pulled Icing. Says it melts in your mouth. She described it as sugar and water (I think on the water) boiled to the thread stage then beat into beaten egg whites. That's it. No butter. It's definitely not IMBC.

New one on me.


It is most likely pulled sugar. I've seen it demonstrated years ago in one of those OLD Wilton Encyclopedias of Cake Decorating.

You boil sugar, water and cream of tartar to a certain temp. You pour it onto a greased marble slab, let it cool until it can be handled, and then pull it like you would taffy until is it satiny and stiffened.

In the demo, Norman Wilton [I believe that was the name] pulled in into long flat ribbons and wrapped the sides of the cake. He then used the excess to make decorations.

Once the cake sets for a while, the taffy like sugar transforms into a soft, buttermint type consistency.

It was beautiful.....but I doubt I would ever attempt it!

-K8memphis Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:20pm
post #15 of 23

Pulled sugar has no egg whites.

-K8memphis Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:23pm
post #16 of 23

Geez if I got industrious/motivated fat chance some day I'll try it.

But I'm getting a divinity type feel for it~~How bad/hard would that rock!

edited to say--I mean the cooked stuff with the egg whites--maybe you discovered some precomputerhistoric dinosaur icing bones Leah

icer101 Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:30pm
post #17 of 23

no, it is not pulled sugar.. that art is still done today.. norman wilton.... just introduced here.. they give demos on it at the ices convention each year.. making beautiful flowers.. swags.. etc.. wish i knew how to do it all.. not that i would do it all the time.. just like to know how...

bobwonderbuns Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:37pm
post #18 of 23

This is very interesting. I've never heard of pulled icing, but I have heard of rolled buttercream and pulled sugar, neither of which are even close to each other as to be confused. I'm looking forward to the others comments on this thread. icon_biggrin.gif

cownsj Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 5:02pm
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

cownsj, rolled buttercream isn't new, but I personally think it's DISgusting.




Thanks for the input. I guess I won't have to worry about trying to fit that into my schedule now with Christmas plans in the works

leah_s Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 5:40pm
post #20 of 23

::flips hair::

icon_smile.gif

I've done pulled sugar. Well, in culinary school and once or twice at home. Too much trouble, but interesting to do.

K8, I think you're right. It's some old fashioned cake "thang."

all4cake Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 1:25am
post #21 of 23

sounds similar to swiss meringue which is like making swiss or italian meringue buttercream but without the butter...(can be made by either technique)

The recipe is posted in their ms weddings magazine that features this cake...

http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/recipe/crisp-meringue-panels

all4cake Posted 28 Nov 2009 , 1:29am
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

Geez if I got industrious/motivated fat chance some day I'll try it.

But I'm getting a divinity type feel for it~~How bad/hard would that rock!

edited to say--I mean the cooked stuff with the egg whites--maybe you discovered some precomputerhistoric dinosaur icing bones Leah




Today, was a PERFECT day for divinity!

and you're right! It is divinity(pretty much)!

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