Question About Original German Black Forest Cake

Decorating By cakelovincrazy Updated 26 Nov 2009 , 1:49am by cakelovincrazy

cakelovincrazy Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 6:47pm
post #1 of 8

I'm making this cake for my husband who is from Germany, so I wanted to make an authentic black forest cake for him. I came across this website:
http://www.europeancuisines.com/German-Schwarzwalder-Kirschtorte-Recipe-Black-Forest-Cake-Cherry-Kirsch

After I baked the cake I realized it didn't call for any baking powder or baking soda and that it also said just 1 cup of flour. the batter was to be divided in 3 8in pans, so I figured each cake would be really thin, but now I'm wondering if maybe I should have used self rising flour. the recipe didn't specify, just said "1 cup of flour".
Here is a picture of the cakes after cooling. I'm just not sure if that is how cakes are over there. Do you think they are supposed to be this thin or should I do them over using self rising flour?

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7 replies
myslady Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 9:34pm
post #2 of 8

I am not sure either, but looking at the picture that was with the recipe, those cake layers looked to be the same size as yours.

When I make a black forest cake, I just use a regular chocolate cake recipe, and continue with the instructions beyond making the cake.

alliebear Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 9:45pm
post #3 of 8

i think perhaps the cake is probably very fudgy and dense. it might have something to do with the fact that this is a traditional recipe. maybe you can cut a little piece and try some for yourself.

CookieD-oh Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 10:00pm
post #4 of 8

I make the black forest cake out of "The Chocolate Bible", and the layers are thin like that.

Magna Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 10:08pm
post #5 of 8

European cake layers are usually this thin. Kirsch will make the layers spongy.

EuroCuisineLady Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 10:29pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakelovincrazy

Do you think they are supposed to be this thin or should I do them over using self rising flour?




You got them exactly right! This cake is old enough (historically speaking) that it doesn't involve any leavening or raising agent like baking powder or soda: the only thing that raises the individual layers is the air you beat into the batter... which is why the recipe puts such emphasis on how well the eggs should be beaten ("until fluffy") and how carefully you should add the flour, doing your best to keep any air from being knocked out of the mixture.

When you run into this cake in Germany, the layers are sometimes even thinner. I've seen them as thin as a quarter inch. (Mine mostly seem to come out at the half-inch level.)

Doug Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 11:26pm
post #7 of 8

and checking a German recipe site (in Deutsch) -- the top rated recipes said to SEPARATE the eggs -- beat the whites until stiff and beat the yolks, sugar and butter until light and fully as well. then stir flour into butter mixture and finally fold the stiff whites into the butter batter.

as EuroCuisineLady already pointed out -- the leavening is the air.

and if you've ever had the real deal (waves hand high) -- it's all about thin layers soaked with krischwasser of cake separate by equally thick or thicker layers of filling with cherries smooshed in.

then smothered in stablized whipped cream and chocolate curls and ....

alright -- time for a "field trip"

cakelovincrazy Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 1:49am
post #8 of 8

Thank you guys, so glad to know that is the correct size. I went ahead and made the cake, here is the final results.
DH said it was great for a first try, but thought the cake was a bit too dry as did I. I think I will try next time using my own tried and true chocolate cake and cut the layers very thin. I also wish now that I hadn't added the whipped topping to the bottom rim of the cake, doesn't look as nice. I just didn't want to waste the rest of it so.... I also realized that I peeled the chocolate too thick. Oh well, great learning experience.
Here are some pictures. Thanks for all the input, I think next time will be much better.
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Here are the layers, you can tell it's a little dry.
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