Cake Has To Travel 260 Miles-What Would You Do?

Decorating By mrsclox Updated 26 Nov 2009 , 3:11am by tigerhawk83

mrsclox Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 4:06pm
post #1 of 7

My Aunt ordered a cake for her wedding dinner this weekend. Just a 12" round, nothing big, but it has to travel 260 miles and I'm not taking it. I originally thought it would probably travel better covered in fondant, but really don't have time to make fondant (she did pick on of the busiest weeks of the year). I would much rather do buttercream. I will dam the layers as best I can, but know there will likely be some settling anyway. Any recommendations?

6 replies
jammjenks Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 5:15pm
post #2 of 7

Holy Moly, girl! After looking at your gallery, it's no wonder she wants you to make the cake from 260 miles away!

Make it a day or two before and let it sit, crumbcoated, to allow for any settling that may occur. Once completed, refrigerate it because cold cakes travel better. Maybe you can put it in a cooler to keep it cold as long as possible.

What will your board be covered in?

mrsclox Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 5:21pm
post #3 of 7

Thanks for the compliment!

The cake will just be on a prefab foil covered board. I plan to put a dowel through it so it doesn't slide around. I'm worried about the buttercream cracking or shifting, but I really don't want to do fondant. I just don't have time.

kakeladi Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 1:21am
post #4 of 7

I know it's late but b'cream should hold up well as long as it's not hot.
Make the b'cream a bit creamier by adding an extra 1/4 cup Crisco.
Instead of dowels I'd use 3 straws.

ninatat Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 12:02am
post #5 of 7

have them pick it up. sorry me bad, i just couldn't help it, and wow on the gallery

Gingoodies Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 2:02am
post #6 of 7

If this is just a 12" round cake (Not a tiered cake) there is absolutely NO REASON to put dowels in there! If the cake wants to slide, it will. Dowels will not make it more stable. Actually, it will do just the opposite.
Make your cake, crumb coat and let it settle. Do your final buttercream and decorations and then refridgerate the cake till it is good and firm. If you have access to a cooler that will hold a cake this size, use it. Unless it is extremely warm where you are, the cake should hold up ok.

tigerhawk83 Posted 26 Nov 2009 , 3:11am
post #7 of 7

I have photos in my gallery of a round cake and 2 sheets that went 250 miles in the car in early October with no problem and they were done in buttercream. I baked and froze a few days in advance, torted and iced on Tuesday, decorated on Wednesday, traveled on Friday and served on Saturday and they were fine.

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