Swirl Dessert Cakes

Decorating By lilthorner Updated 24 Nov 2009 , 6:21am by JanH

lilthorner Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 4:03am
post #1 of 7
6 replies
JanH Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 4:23am
post #2 of 7

I would think the technique would be similar to using the (infamous) Wilton icing sculptor - but with just a plain spatula edge:

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?sku=2104-12

I'd start the swirl on the side starting from the bottom and working up. Lifting the spatula to make each swirl separately and trying to keep the spacing somewhat even.

On the top, I would start from the outside and work inwards, ending with the little flip. (Never lifting the spatula.)

From the example, this is a more homey look that doesn't have to be perfect to be pretty. icon_smile.gif

HTH

lilthorner Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 5:39am
post #3 of 7

thanks Jan, I haven't ever seen the wilton thing used.. I have an ateco one for my cake sides but I really want to do this swirl.. and yup, it's for "homey" or dessert style cakes (so I don't say "homemade")

tallgood Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 6:00am
post #4 of 7

Hate to say it, but it looks like it was made on a potter's wheel. Ice your cake, then maybe have someone continuously turning your turntable while you start at the bottom and gradually move your spatula upwards, then around the top edge and on to the middle.

Just guessing!

JanH Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 6:14am
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilthorner

I have an ateco one for my cake sides but I really want to do this swirl..




Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

I would think the technique would be similar to using the (infamous) Wilton icing sculptor - - but with just a plain spatula edge.

I'd start the swirl on the side starting from the bottom and working up. Lifting the spatula to make each swirl separately and trying to keep the spacing somewhat even.

On the top, I would start from the outside and work inwards, ending with the little flip. (Never lifting the spatula.)to make each swirl separately and trying to keep the spacing somewhat even.

On the top, I would start from the outside and work inwards, ending with the little flip. (Never lifting the spatula.)




Don't use your ateco icing tool, use the end of a spatula. Hold parallel to the side of the cake and perpendicular on the cake top all the while spinning the turntable. icon_smile.gif

lilthorner Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 6:16am
post #6 of 7

yup, ill try it for thanksgiving.. if all else fails, my regular swirls and billows will suffice

JanH Posted 24 Nov 2009 , 6:21am
post #7 of 7

Well, icing is pretty forgiving. So yes, if you don't like it, you can always fall back and use your tried and true methods. thumbs_up.gif

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